• Don't link to the video of the Christchurch shooting, or repost links to the shooter's manifesto.

NY Times D&D Article: Illustrative Context

E.T.Smith

A Most Sincere Poseur
Validated User
#1
So it turns out that a request by the NYTimes for pictures of actual gamers in the act of gaming D&D was not an attempt to to find out anything about the actual culture, or give a chance for gamers te represent themselves in a diverse and positive light. It was just a way to grab a bit of flash to garnish the WotC press-release announcing 5th edition.

The article, as has been hashed out here extensively, appeared in Tuesday's paper, Jan. 10. The image chosen for the print edition is of a few folks watching a giant d20 with shapely legs strut about, a performance by the D20 Burlesque troupe. I suppose in the end, gamers actually gaming wasn't hot enough to appear in the NYT (no disrespect to the skillful troupe intended).

Here's the interesting thing about that image: it was taken at the Soho Gallery for Digital art during the "Dungeons and Dragons: On and Ever Onward" exhibit. The exhibit involved displays of art by golden age TSR illustrator Erol Otus and several artists working from his tradition. It was also a release party for Adventurer Conquerer King, a new game in the OSR style. Besides ACK, tables were playing original tan-box D&D (run by one of Gygax's original players) and a huge table running BXD&D (I was one of a dozen players at that). Also briefly present was Luke Crane of Burning Wheel anda few other indie folks.

What is notably absent from that gathering was any element of modern D&D or anything to do with Wizards of the Coast, its corporate properties, or profits derived therefrom. It would be hard to come of with a gathering that better illustrtes the irrelavance of WotC's strategies and ambitions on people who just enjoy playing and celebrating the games or making their own.

Three things I take from this experience.
* Somebody at the NYTimes knew well in advance of the coming announcement. I really hate being reminded how much of the news-media is just a process of distributing press releases.
* I am slightly miffed that WotC managed to steal hard-won publicity away from independent producers by co-opting coverage of the gallery event, even if unintentionally.
*WotC's stated goal of "unifying the editions" makes good press but is laughably irrelevant to significant audiences.
 
Last edited:

hexgrid

Registered User
Validated User
#4
What is notably absent from that gathering was any element of modern D&D or anything to do with Wizards of the Coast, its corporate properties, or profits derived therefrom. It would be hard to come of with a gathering that better illustrtes the irrelavance of WotC's strategies and ambitions on people who just enjoy playing and celebrating the games or making their own.
Does Adventurer Conquerer King not use the OGL?
 

Libramarian

New member
Banned
#7
I think 5e is going to show which members of the OSR are doing what they do for the love of D&D, and which members are just using it as an opportunity to pretend their collection of D&D houserules are new games.

I know that's an inflammatory statement, but honestly it's been disheartening to see the shift in values in the OSR over the last few years. You just called Adventurer Conquerer King a "new game in the OSR style". That's an absurdity that the original retroclone authors would never have said. Whatever happened to "this isn't the greatest game in the world, it's just a tribute"?

Have you read the Legends & Lore compilation? I can't see how anyone who had the most fun with pre-3e D&D could not be intrigued after reading it. Unless they were more interested in vanity-publishing fantasy heartbreakers than playing Dungeons & Dragons.

That's what a minor...minor...amount of success will do to some people, I suppose.

I wish you luck in competing with WOTC if 5e makes B/X players like me happy, which I am least cautiously optimistic it will. You're going to need it.
 
#10
* I am slightly miffed that WotC managed to steal hard-won publicity away from independent producers by co-opting coverage of the gallery event, even if unintentionally.
No no no, we managed to steal some of WotC's carefully orchestrated spotlight and give it to local independent producers and artists! This scheme succeeded remarkably well, I think everyone involved is as happy as adventurers eagerly divvying up the contents of a giant's bag.

- The author of the NY Times piece, Ethan Gilsdorf, contacted me to get some quotes for the article. One of his questions was "where can the Times get pictures," but I answered lots of other questions knowing that he wouldn't be able to use most/all of what I said and that his editors might omit whatever was left.

- Ethan made sure that credit went where it was due by running a piece in Wired's GeekDad blog, where he does have pretty much complete control over what appears. I think it's a good idea to fill journalist-types with as much info about RPGs as possible - even if it's not immediately useful it could crop up later - but Ethan is a deep-dyed gamer and all-around good guy, I was preaching to the choir.

- I likewise knew (but maybe should have been clearer in saying at the Mule post) that it was also possible that none of the pictures would make it in. Although I was sad when they pleased their corporate masters by using the WotC publicity photo on the initial website version of the story, I think it was actually a clever bit of subversion that for the print edition of the paper they went with the more interesting and local image.

- Tim Hutchings, curator of the gallery show, can be seen in the front row of that photo and continues to be as pleased about it as you can see he was to be watching the burlesque in the first place.

- The Twenty Sided Store got a profile and a slideshow in the NY/Metro region; I suggested they send a photographer out there to get pictures for the D&D piece, and they did one better and sent a reporter to do a profile as well.

- One of artist Casey Jex Smith's images from the show - a portrait of Mitt Romney as a D&D character sheet - was covered in the Huffington Post, giving him mad press with which he and his gallery Allegra LaViola was very pleased.

- The Soho Gallery for Digital Art, whose owner is a gamer & was really glad to host gamers for these parties, was mentioned in the Times print photo caption, making him happy as well.

- d20 Burlesque wasn't mentioned in the caption - I think because it is an in-joke hard to explain in so few words, whereas "Soho Gallery for Digital Art" is self-explanatory - but I think Anja and Keith are pleased as punch nonetheless. And they got to try out the Action Castle-style piece Jared Sorenson wrote for d20 Burlesque in front of a highly appreciative audience!

- Some of us got to play with Old Geezer, thus earning my undying envy!
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom