Odd Things You Like in RPGs that Others Think are Odd?

Silvercat Moonpaw

Quadruped Transhuman
Validated User
There are some pros alongside the cons of living in a city, just like amy place, and I would think some outsider characters would appreciate or acknowledge a little bit of some upsides of living in a (hopefully healthy and nice!) city area. Not all cities are nice, of course, but there are various reasons why some people would be attracted to the city life.
I think scoffing barbarians were created by people who didn't know how good they had it. Too much Survival of the Fittest and Nietzsche, not enough actual thought.
 

swammeyjoe

Registered User
Validated User
This is something that has turned me off new games and is something I disliked about Pendragon 'passions'. I've been playing since I was 17 and I'm 54, I can roleplay anything and hard-wired RPing rules damps my style, I find them more of a hindrance than an aid and it's something I regret was ported into RuneQuest - Glorantha.
I haven't met truly shy player in years, most players I meet are big-mouths like me.
It's not about being shy, but wanting to be able to create a character who mechanically can do anything, be that social or physical. If everyone can build a melee or ranged fighter while having no skill at arms in real life, they should be able to do the same for a social butterfly.

Plus that way you get consistent, rules based results to social/emotional activities. There's no need to trust the GM or hope the whole group sees it the same way. Some days you just want to describe what you're doing in the third person and roll some dice and get consistent, deterministic results.

I think the second paragraph there can be contribution to this thread...though I also love minigames.
 

SunlessNick

Mildly Darkened One
Validated User
And, yeah, I never liked the cliche Barbarian scoffing the city folks and such. You would think there would be outsider characters who would like the luxury stuff, and loads of more easily accessible food and perhaps better quality of living (for some cities) and the soft fabrics, and the money or gold/silver/valuable minerals, and valuable goods to trade, etc.
Historically, a common reason for barbarians conquering cities was that it meant they then got to live there.

On the subject of magic-as-science and magic-as-tech, are there any settings that do this with divine magic rather than arcane? (The God-Learners from RuneQuest maybe, but any others?).
 

Dagor

Registered User
Validated User
I think scoffing barbarians were created by people who didn't know how good they had it. Too much Survival of the Fittest and Nietzsche, not enough actual thought.
Most likely also by people who knew exactly how good they had it and looked down their noses at "barbarians", "savages", and "primitives". These people aren't any dumber than you, city slicker(*), and if you and yours insist on talking down to them it's only natural that they'll return the sentiment soon enough!

(*) Generic 'you' here, just so there aren't any misunderstandings. :)

Plus that way you get consistent, rules based results to social/emotional activities. There's no need to trust the GM or hope the whole group sees it the same way. Some days you just want to describe what you're doing in the third person and roll some dice and get consistent, deterministic results.
Which is a sentiment that anyone who's ever gotten into an argument about "alignment" precisely because the GM and/or the rest of the group didn't see things their way and the actual rules were an annoying combination of confused, nonsensical and/or vague should probably appreciate. :D
 

ChalkLine

Rogue Conformist
Validated User
You know the thread:
"Realistic" things that no-one actually wants to deal with in fantasy games
Most of the things in it that everyone hates
 

Pax Chi

Registered User
Validated User
Cinematic / wire-fu / "chi" style martial arts in . . . well, pretty much everything. Especially fantasy settings where folks still like to tell me they're out of place.
 

DavetheLost

Registered User
Validated User
*thumbs up*
I feel like more simulationist mechanics remind me it is a simulation and make it all the more glaring when it produces weird results, whereas with more gameplay first oriented rules, I can just ignore them and focus on immersing myself with the narrative, as well as think of clever solutions to explain away weird results.
I prefer "genre emulation" focused rules to "realism simulation" focused rules. In an Action Hero game I am fine with characters brushing off gunshot wounds, that is pretty characteristic of the genre even though it is not realistic, I would not want it in a gritty police procedural game. Giant, intelligent, flying, fire-breathing lizards? Fine in D&D. I don't care how they fly, it's a magical world. Try to put a dragon in a Traveller adventure and I am going to pick it apart for a hundred violations of biology, physics, probably chemistry, etc.

And yeah, weird results from simulations mechanics really jump out when they happen in play.

Realism in RPGs to me matters most as realism and verisimilitude according the conventions of the genre and the game world.
 

Chris Goodwin

not a robot
Validated User
Another odd thing I like is the occasional alien presence in a fantasy RPG or setting. Barrier Peaks, Tale of the Comet, grey aliens in a fantasy realm, etc.
 

Lukas Sjöström

Society of Unity scholar
Validated User
I think scoffing barbarians were created by people who didn't know how good they had it. Too much Survival of the Fittest and Nietzsche, not enough actual thought.
On the other hand, one could look at The Art of Not Being Governed for counterexamples: people routinely, actively moved into less easliy controlled terrain in order to escape the reach of "civilisation", which to most of its inhabitants was synonymous with slavery or serfdom. The "barbarians" of history might have coveted the luxuries of the top percent of civilised people, but had often made an active choice of a less regimented but perhaps materially poorer existence than that of the common people. The "proud savages who have only contempt for everything to do with civilisation" narrative might be a false one, but so is the one stating that everyone would obviously want to be an agriculturalist, a member of a strong state, and so on.
 
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