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Picking and Choosing from the D100 Fantasy Buffet.

GM_Michael

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The GM in my current game group needs to take a break for a few weeks for various reasons. This is being planned though the break will happen in a couple months. We are looking to wrap up our current D&D 5e story arc - after which, I have volunteered to run RuneQuest/D100 for our game group (Which is a system I have preferred to D&D). After reading online about the editions of Runequest past 3rd edition, I bought a copy of MYTHRAS and I must say the pundits were right - there are some nice D100 ideas in that system. My problem is that not EVERY idea in Mythras is something I like and I am trying to pull from the huge D100 buffet to grab the choicest plates of food that are best from the buffet....

Things I like in Mythras

COMBAT STYLES.
SKILL SET (Looks slightly smaller to me than RQ3) and STARTING SKILL CALCULATIONS
NO RESISTANCE TABLE

Things I Debate about...

ROLLING A "SPECIAL" (RQ STYLE) VS COMBAT "EFFECTS"
DEALING WITH WHAT USED TO BE "DODGE" IN RQ3 (DO PLAYERS FIGHT AND DEFEND IN THE SAME ROUND WITH SAME ONE HANDED WEAPON?)
ACTION POINTS (Will likely just go with 2/RQ style actions)

What variants of D100 do you prefer? What rules do you like from the D100 Buffet. Why do you like them? What successes have you had in melding D100 Rule sets? Just looking for thoughts on what people like and why...

GM_Michael
 

tanaka84

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I really like Revolution D100, it has the same parental DNA as Mythras with some narrative and pacing mechanics baked in. Unfortunately I get the feeling that it's very "First editiony", as in, a lot of the procedures could be optimized and the game desperately needs an english speaking editor.

If you can look beyond the warts, you get a strong generic system that can deal from low magic to epic fantasy :)

I really like the way how it uses Strike Ranks to decide action order and how many actions you can take, the maneuvers are great, and the way to calculate a critical roll (if the tens die is higher than the ones die, is sheer brilliance)
 
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Stone-Tharp

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I'm a hardcore Mythras fan, so that's obviously what I'm going to recommend.

To answer your question: Yes, players can fight and defend in the same round with the same one-handed weapon in it. Although they might also choose to use their shield instead (and Myhras treats shields as weapons that have one or two special properties). Dodging is handled with the Evade skill and works a bit differently but is also an option

Re: combat effects, I think they're the make or break it part of Mythras. I've had tons of players utterly fall in love with how they make every blow (and many parries too) have narrative impact beyond causing or preventing damage. This includes both players into detailed combat systems and those who typically are not. But if you find them cumbersome, they'll wreck combat altogether.
 

g33k

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Re: combat effects, I think they're the make or break it part of Mythras. I've had tons of players utterly fall in love with how they make every blow (and many parries too) have narrative impact beyond causing or preventing damage. This includes both players into detailed combat systems and those who typically are not. But if you find them cumbersome, they'll wreck combat altogether.
I want to +1 this. It's the most substantive element of how Mythras differs from other d100 games; it tends to work REALLY well, or REALLY bog things down.

IME, players new to the system tend to suffer from decision-paralysis when faced with the huge mass of Combat Effects. I see reports that TDM's "Combat Cards" help here (but may be off the market??? At least I cannot find them on TDM webstore); as does having the GM pre-prep a smaller subset of Combat Effects for each PC. I haven't personally had a chance to try these with a group of newbies to see if it makes things better.

When they work well, these Effects can become key elements to differentiate different PC's, and defining elements of a combat, in place of mere "HP's of damage".

The other thing is to understand how ActionPoints influence things; on a 1:1 basis, you gain a big tactical advantage when you take control of a combat; on a strategic basis, the entire party's pool of APs can be used to overpower the Very Tough combatant in a Boss-Fight.
 

Tristen

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Mythras is easily my BRP favourite as well, though I prefer the lighter Imperative version clocking in at 32 pages. With that as a base, I can pick the parts I need from the main rulebook and the quickly growing number of setting books.

Regarding combat special effects, my group really enjoys them. They turn combat into fun, creative challenges, full of narrative potential. We started with only a handful of special effects and added more as we got comfortable with the system.

We have also added in the rules for Extended Conflicts from M-Space and use them a lot for social conflicts, chases, struggles against natural forces and so on. Depending on the setting, I would also recommend Luther Arkwright, After the Vampire Wars and Mythic Constantinople. They are exceptional resources, both for rules and setting details.

With Chaosium focusing entirely on Runequest and Call Of Cthulhu, Mythras is quickly becoming the new creative BRP hothouse. TDM is publishing new books at impressive speed. And with a new secret fantasy setting license in the works, we certainly have an interesting year ahead of us.
 

Dillon_Burke

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At the end of my RQ6 campaign, the players were pretty clear that they didn't think choosing combat effects added much to the d100 game. As GM I found they added too much handling time, and while there is a lot I like in the system I would not use either the combat effects system or its action point economy again. The combats were drearily predictable with them. The ability to stun lock opponents meant solo monsters were trivial to defeat - by the end of the campaign only opponents who could kill a PC on their first attack or had a "save or die" effect were in the slightest bit intimidating. As you can see, our experience was the reverse of what other people have posted. I think for me it just tried too hard to model single passes in a duel, and ended up missing how a melee works.

Revolution 100 has some nice ideas (and I backed its crowd funding on the strength of them), but I found the final text impenetrable. I have picked it up to read many times but always end up putting it down again. M-Space has a much better explanation of extended conflicts.
 

Alban

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As others, my favourite BRP game would include rules from many existing games.

-No Resistance Table,
-A limited number of broad skills, with specializations (like Revolution traits, but with variable bonuses),
-Skills based on only 1 characteristic x2,
-Generic conflict resolution from Revolution d100,
-StormBringer-style Major wounds,
-MRQ-style Improvement points,
-SPQR Critical & Special chances (skill/10 and Skill/2 - simpler than Skill/5 and Skill/20),
-Parries that reduce attack damage by a number depending on weapon and success level,
-A mix between RQ3 Sandy Petersen's rules, RQ6 and OpenQuest for magic.
-RQ6 Combat Maneuvers,
For Initiative, either:
-A Revolution-style reverse Initiative system, with each action and reaction reducing Initiative and thus defining a new turn order.
Or:
-A base number of 1 Action and 1 Reaction, with a -20% cumulative modifier after the first.
-Quickly recovered Hit Points and Magic Points, with a system of "handicap"/wounds/mana burns that would reduce maximum HP and/or MP for weeks or months.
 

Stone-Tharp

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I want to +1 this. It's the most substantive element of how Mythras differs from other d100 games; it tends to work REALLY well, or REALLY bog things down.

IME, players new to the system tend to suffer from decision-paralysis when faced with the huge mass of Combat Effects. I see reports that TDM's "Combat Cards" help here (but may be off the market??? At least I cannot find them on TDM webstore); as does having the GM pre-prep a smaller subset of Combat Effects for each PC. I haven't personally had a chance to try these with a group of newbies to see if it makes things better.

When they work well, these Effects can become key elements to differentiate different PC's, and defining elements of a combat, in place of mere "HP's of damage".

The other thing is to understand how ActionPoints influence things; on a 1:1 basis, you gain a big tactical advantage when you take control of a combat; on a strategic basis, the entire party's pool of APs can be used to overpower the Very Tough combatant in a Boss-Fight.
The cards are very useful in my experience. I think you can order them through DriveThruRPG currently? Without the cards, what I've found helpful for new players is, as GM, to suggest a small menu of appropriate combat effects (based on the current weapon being used, crit or not, and fictional circumstances). It cuts down on the analysis paralysis chance, and I've noticed that it's not long before players start saying "no, I want to do X instead"-to I'll say which effect could do that. Soon enough, they're looking them up on their own and picking without me.
 

GM_Michael

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what I've found helpful for new players is, as GM, to suggest a small menu of appropriate combat effects (based on the current weapon being used, crit or not, and fictional circumstances). It cuts down on the analysis paralysis chance, and I've noticed that it's not long before players start saying "no, I want to do X instead"-to I'll say which effect could do that. Soon enough, they're looking them up on their own and picking without me.
I am leaning to doing this as I update my D100 style game. My experience from back in the day was RQ 2/3 (I started playing RQ2, but RQ3 was the edition available for purchase when I started to GM the system. I may have to look into Revolution D100.

To make things easy, I am very tempted to say that a "Hard" roll is 1/2 of a Normal Skill roll (BRP rules) and a VERY HARD roll is 1/5 ( a 1/5 skill roll can be simulated by requiring a normal success roll that ends in either a 5 or a 0).

I loved using AP and damage reduction on shields and armor back in the day, and having shields break or spears get broken against shields. I suspect my current group would find that too much record keeping.
 

Stone-Tharp

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Y'know, looking back your list of pros/cons for Mythras, you might want to check out Mythras Imperative. It's the free, stripped-down intro PDF for the game. Mostly it's just the core rules without a lot of the extra toolbox material (it leaves out the magic systems and cults/brotherhoods rules, for example).

But it also uses a static number of Action Points for all characters. And has a narrower, more limited list of combat effects
 
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