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Planetary Romance: Luna?

Glamourweaver

Registered User
Validated User
I'm fleshing out the solar system for a pulp setting with planetary romance tropes. I've got a pretty strong grasp on what I want to do with Mercury, Venus, Mars, and the Jovian moons.

But I'm not finding a lot on Earth's moon to draw on. I guess there wasn't a big window of time in between the moon being conceived of as a "place" and it being perceived as barren and empty. It never got to be a mysterious "other world" like Venus and Mars did.

That said, I'm willing to do something different with it, if I come up with something.

For context, I'm leaning into the idea that the inner planets at least form an age range showing the life cycle of planets. Mercury is is still half molten, an infant world (but a tidally locked one so you get a habitable longitudinal ring of twilight in the middle). Venus is a world in its wild adolescence, primal and bursting with savage life. Earth is in its maturity, dominated by organized civilization. Mars in an ancient dying world, where the last of civilization clings to oases and canals in the wasteland. And then the asteroid belt gives you a world that's already dead.
 

jamieth

Registered User
Validated User
Moon's surface being barren and empty sufggests that whatever civilization there is, must live under the surface.
 

Lord Iron Wolf

Always the Hard Way
Validated User
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne; The Moon Maid, The Moon Men, The Red Hawk trilogy by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Space 1889 from Game Designers Workshop/Clockwerks Publishing, are a few possible sources. Maza of the Moon by Otis Alberth Kline comes to mind too.
 

NMC

Registered User
Validated User
I'm intrigued by the connection between the moon and lycanthropy, if your setting includes that element.

If not, then there's always the possibility that the moon was a passing sattelite snagged by the Earth's gravity, and that it could be something highly unusual. Maybe it has clockwork inhabitants, and therefore is timeless?

-Nate
 

Lenin

Tolerant Ent
Validated User
I'm intrigued by the connection between the moon and lycanthropy, if your setting includes that element.
Werewolves on the moon retain their beast form at all times, except when the Earth is full and the Manbane blooms.
 

DarkStarling

Brilliantly Crazed
Validated User
You need a mysterious, hidden civilization on the dark side of the moon.

Maybe some cities powered by lost technology with primitive inhabitants.as unaware of Earth as we are of them. Who put them there, and why?

The 'Who' is the subterranean moon inhabitants. The why though? A mystery.
 

Maxen M

Somewhere off to the side
Validated User
The moon has a dark side, always hiding it's true face, with criminals and smugglers, hiding their piracy from the civilised world, as it sends out its raiding parties to steal of the trade between the ancient wealth of mars and the young vibrancy of venus. And so travellers wrap space around them as they travel through our orbit, in cloaks of darkness to avoid the marauding moon men.
 

LuciusAlexander

PalindromedaryRider
Validated User
One idea:

If you want to have the inner worlds represent phases - Venus is as Earth was once, Mars is as Earth may one day be - then Luna, being in the same orbit as Earth, would be at the same stage - a twin, so to speak.

You can make it an evil twin.

The surface is barren because the inhabitants either fought ruinous wars or over-exploited their biome until it collapsed entirely. The Moon could still be contaminated with biological or chemical warfare agents - that might threaten Terrestrial life as well.

At points around the equatorial region though there is machinery still visible - solar panels obviously, and radio receivers. Close enough examination reveals the solar arrays are still generating electricity and sending it by cable deep into the Moon. Maybe survivors are still under there. And maybe they're listening to everything we broadcast. Which means....they know we know they're there now.

Lucius Alexander

But nobody expects the palindromedary
 

tsadkiel

Blue and mean.
Validated User
But I'm not finding a lot on Earth's moon to draw on. I guess there wasn't a big window of time in between the moon being conceived of as a "place" and it being perceived as barren and empty. It never got to be a mysterious "other world" like Venus and Mars did.
Not that narrow a window - Lucian of Samosata was writing about his adventures among the Moon Men in the second century, and he was followed by such luminaries as Kepler, Cyrano de Bergerac, Baron Muchausen, Washington Irving, and Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. Compared to Burroughs, et al, moon stories tend to be super weird, but they're out there.
 

Sven_Noren

Statistical Outlier
Validated User
If the Earth represents maturity and organisation, then the Earth - Moon relationship suggests married life to me. Individuals close to each other, shaping their lives to one another.

Or perhaps the Moon represents the wild and crazy ideas one gets when the staid life becomes too much.
 
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