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player's options: more is more

Willy Elektrix

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I was talking to someone about their homebrew fantasy game, and he proudly proclaimed that it had 50 races and 100 classes. Something about that excess struck a chord with me and got me thinking.

What games are out there with a truly absurd number of player options (classes, races, feats, abilities, etc.). I'd prefer to learn about games with lots of options in the core book or books. Because, obviously, games that have been around for a while often have a glut of options (i.e. Rifts, Pathfinder, AD&D2e).

I'm not sure I want to play these games, but I've created games in this style, and I wonder what else is out there.
 

Nate_MI

Hail Tzeentch!
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There's a term for certain homebrew games called "heartbreakers." Take a look for some, especially developed around the AD&D era, and you will find games with hundreds of races and classes and everything else. Warning: Heartbreakers may also contain large amounts of racism, sexism, etc.
 

Endless Rain

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What games are out there with a truly absurd number of player options (classes, races, feats, abilities, etc.). I'd prefer to learn about games with lots of options in the core book or books. Because, obviously, games that have been around for a while often have a glut of options (i.e. Rifts, Pathfinder, AD&D2e).
I'm interested in the same thing, but I don't care about whether the options are in the core rulebook(s) or not.
 

Skaorn

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Star Wars might not have classes depending on the system but it definitely had a huge number of PC species.
 

baakyocalder

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HackMaster's AD&D 2e version had about 400 skills. While the classes were limited to mostly those in the main AD&D 2e book and the assassin (brought back from 1e) and the races were limited to some homebrew races from the KODT comic and the AD&D races, the class books added many classes. There were over 100 classes if you counted the various magic-user specialist classes because the Spellslinger's Guide had single-specialist (like AD&D illusionist), double-specialist and sole practitioner (like an evocation caster focused on ice spells, the icer). Specialty clerics in the Zealot's Guide also added many classes.

I believe, though I only owned the book briefly, that Battlelords of the 23rd century had many races for its science fiction universe.
 

Victim

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Anima Beyond Fantasy has a lot of classes and a bunch of different power/magic systems in its core stuff. I mean, I don't think the class design is super creative - you have combat guys, skill guys, specialists in most of the power systems (ki, spells, psionics, summoning), and then a lot of hybrids between the different areas.
 

Michele

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Well, GURPS has no classes - which makes choices so numerous some players feel daunted. The core book lists hundred of advantages, disadvantages, minor traits (quirks and perks), and limitations and enhancement to said advantages and disadvantages. The basic stuff for having supernatural, super-heroic, magic-using, and psionic characters is all in the core book. Plenty of species, too, and you can always make up your own using the same point-based mechanics, typical of GURPS. And you can have kitchen-sink campaigns with everything in them.

I'll have to admit I'm biased in favor of GURPS, naturally, but I sincerely believe this ruleset by SJG remains the best for this sort of thing.
 
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