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Radiance RPG: Electric Bugaloo

theCimmerian

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#1
This is a continuation of the general discussion of Radiance from here: http://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php...ooks-like-a-Dungeons-and-Dragons-3-5-4-hybrid

To pick up where the last thread discussion left off,
More racial abilities at higher tiers -- handled as a 1-level template or such -- is on my mind. Considering 1 for each creature type (aberration, celestial, construct, undead, etc) plus 6 environments and maybe (unsure) some based on nationality. Each template would be keyed to several relevant races, possibly most as with undead. So for example, atlans, dromites, elans, and one or two others could be an "aberrant [racial] champion". It would look something like this:

Champions

Bloodline: Aberrant
Qualification: Levels in battlemind or psion; race is human, atlan, dromite, dwarf, or elan.
Prime Attribute: Wisdom
Benefits: You gain the following abilities.
Aberrant BloodM: Consider yourself an aberrant type creature as well as a person for the purpose of abilities that analyze you and attacks that target you.
Aberrant TelepathyM: You can communicate telepathically out to 100 ft, as easily as you might speak, with aberration type creatures and other persons who qualify for this bloodline.
Detect ThoughtsM: As the psion ability
LevitateM: As the psion ability
Special: If you already possess a benefit ability, then you may use the ability in a special way 3/day, activating it for 0 vitality cost, or doubling its range, duration or effect area.
Hindrance: You are weird. You show obvious aberrant physical traits. Also, apply a -2 penalty on Comeliness and a -2 penalty on Charisma based skill checks except with creatures you can hear using Aberrant Telepathy.

Just an idea!

FYI: The character would gain vitality points, etc when taking this bloodline, just not any class or race abilities or ability boosts or theme awards.
I love this idea. I absolutely love it. In Dungeons and Dragons 3/3.5, I loved the ideas encapsulated in Savage Species, with racial classes, racial levels, etc... but I didn't like the actual rules. I think, given the general way that version of Dungeons and Dragons worked, that's about the best the writers could do. This looks much more interesting, and less clunky.

Of course, if you want to play a vampire-alike, werewolf-alike, or dragon-alike in Radiance you just pick the classes Dhampir, Shifter, and Sorceror, respectively - and they all have enough flexibility that they're more than a generic versions of the respective fantasy creatures.

But there's a lot left to cover - aberrants, as AncientSpirits covered above, undead, fey, giant-kin of all kinds, angelic or demonic, elemental, etc... and Radiance has lots of mutant creatures in it, maybe you could have a PC option for Champion Mutant, too.
 

Tango Samurai

Dance Warrior
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#2
Yeah, I was thinking along the lines of crossbreeds with monsters a'la Trollkin, Ogren (half-ogres), and so on and so forth.
With Radiance, very little is impossible.
 

AncientSpirits

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#3
Riffing off of the thread name, a bugaboo is a low-level aberration that causes fear, and a bugaloo is a low level undead symbiont that plunges you into a zombie like trance where you dance a lot, with a variant, the electric bugaloo, that causes you to throw off electric shocks as you dance. ;-)
 

theCimmerian

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#4
Riffing off of the thread name, a bugaboo is a low-level aberration that causes fear, and a bugaloo is a low level undead symbiont that plunges you into a zombie like trance where you dance a lot, with a variant, the electric bugaloo, that causes you to throw off electric shocks as you dance. ;-)
Cool. I know "Electric Bugaloo" has been overused a lot for sequel titles in discussion forums, but it still makes me laugh to read it.
 

Robyo

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#5
Yeah, I was thinking along the lines of crossbreeds with monsters a'la Trollkin, Ogren (half-ogres), and so on and so forth.
With Radiance, very little is impossible.
This, many times this.

I think half-breed templates would be shiznit cool and I really haven't seen it done before.


Oh, and when I said "drake" earlier, I meant "drack". Derr.
 

AncientSpirits

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#7
Okay, here's a stab at a mutant template, with orcs, gnolls, trolls, etc in mind, though technically there are also harpies, nagas, etc as mutants of a different kind. This is for the brutish mutants rather than beguiling mutants, which is a different template.


Bloodline: Brutish Mutant
Qualification: Levels in alchemist or medicant; race is any except asimar, elan, elf, or half-elf.
Prime Attribute: Constitution
Set Benefits: You gain the following abilities.
---------------------------
Mutant BloodM: Consider yourself a mutant type creature as well as a person for the purpose of abilities that analyze you and attacks that target you.
Size Boost: Boost your height by 1/3rd (3 ft becomes 4 ft, 6 ft becomes 8 ft). This never changes your creature size.
---------------------------
Optional Benefits: You gain 3 of the following benefits, each of which is equivalent to an intermediate ability.
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Mutant Head: You carry a miniature head with you. It is an undeveloped twin. It cannot take actions on its own except to speak. You enjoy a +5 bonus on Will and 1/day can try 1 skill check as a swift action rather than a standard action. However, you suffer a -2 penalty on Stealth due to the head’s excessive commotions and occasional interference in your actions.
Mutant Healing: You automatically heal 1 wound point per round to a maximum of 12 wound points over 24 hours. This works even when you are unconscious but not dead.
Mutant Hide: You gain +1 DR as you acquire a thick (and possibly hirsute) hide and enjoy the benefits of the Endure Elements ability.
Mutant Musculature: You gain the Grapple ability and can deliver 1d2 wound damage as a standard action to a creature you are grappling when you expend 1 vitality and beat its Fortitude.
Mutant Rage: You gain a barbarian’s Rage ability. Moreover, you gain +1d4+1 vitality points for 24 hours when you activate Rage.
Mutant Senses: You enjoy a +5 bonus on Perception checks and once daily you can see invisible creatures within 30 ft for 2 minutes by expending 1 vitality. Moreover, you gain either the Darkvision ability or can learn an adjacent creature’s true type and sex by sniffing it as a standard action if you beat it’s Reflex.
Mutant Snout: You gain the Scent ability and enjoy a +2 bonus on Survival checks.
Mutant Weapons: You gain claws, teeth, hooves, horns and/or other natural weapons that together grant you either 2 attacks that each deliver 1d6 damage + Str or 1 attack that delivers 3d6 damage + Str. Each time you attack, decide which option you prefer.
---------------------------
Hindrance: You are weird. You show obvious mutant physical traits. Also, apply a -2 penalty on Comeliness and a -2 penalty on Charisma based skill checks except with mutant type creatures, including others with the mutant template.

BTW, rather than a +1 level template, this would make an excellent +3 level "Destiny" (prestige class). Prestige classes can be taken earlier than in d20/3.5, and there are fewer levels (only ever 3) though attaining level 3 requires one to be level 9+.
 
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AncientSpirits

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#8
Come to think of it, there ought to be some templates relevant to the pseudo-Edwardian era and electrotech, such as drug addiction and cyber-mutant.
 

AncientSpirits

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#10
The Legacy – Nine Kingdoms Unite from Devastation

This tenuous union of nine nations is recovering from a devastating war. For twelve centuries, each of the proud Legacy kingdoms allied, fought, betrayed, and propped up the others, as advised by politics of the day. They grew rich in culture. And like distracted children, they were unprepared when Infernal Gath brought to bear a horrifying supernatural war-machine of fiery iron and choking gas. Cities were bombed. Land was poisoned. Millions perished. At the last, with neighbors’ aid and a unique heroine, the people survived to say, “In unity, strength”, “With love, comes faith”, and “by Maximilion’s name”.

The member nations include romantic Parnesee, current home to the Legacy’s councils and throne, plus craft-wise Fentaros and Caldore in the west, practical Shermunt and Nerth in the north, rustic Gleeves and Lurl in the midlands; and occult Hexen and Lacrum to the east. The nations mostly fall on the temperate southern side of mountains that split the continent of North Pernicon along its mid-riff. The northern and western lands are wetter and cooler, while the southern and eastern ones are warmer and drier. All are hospitable with clear seasons, ripe for farming and herding, and redolent with steep pastoral hills. On stony heights stand old walled cities. In valleys, peasant hamlets meander along quiet rivers. Seven of the nations sit along the Inner Sea, granting splendid trade routes.

The Nine Kingdoms fall under the Lute constellation. They are the ancient home of a myriad of fey, such as shy dryads, lusty satyrs, and wrathful nymphs. Except for quizzical gnomes, the fey have retreated for now into myth, deep wilds, and secret shrines. Some say their spirits inhabit the wood timbers and stone foundations of buildings. Wherever they are, their inspiration lives on in magnificent art, dance, literature, and theater. Art is enjoyed daily as murals, statues, and curiosities for every building, alleyway, and garden. Regular festivals with costumes, magic, music, and contests mix the sacred and strange. Even math is reworked as geometrically ornate. And the gods are not just caged in temples. The people carry their deities as little icons, phylacteries, jewelry, and statuettes.

Magic is special. Spice is not consumed as a plain dust. Through fey enchantments, flowers, seeds, and other concentrations of plant-life absorb radiance from the soil and are chewed, drunk, or smoked to convey their effect. Their appearance, taste and scent—even their names—vary by neighborhood and kingdom. Rare concoctions can heighten or distort one’s magic. Visitors may easily buy the wrong thing or get more than they bargained for.

The Legacy boasts many of the finest culinary dishes in all of O’arth, from simple rustic breads with roasted fish or hearty cheese to fanciful stuffed swans, luxuriant cakes, and bubbling wines. A slower pace of life fits the joys of dining. The people take to masquerade feasts, midnight suppers, and second breakfasts. These come before more work. After the Great War, the people have embraced these simple pleasantries even more.

Language is ornate and mixed with subtle non-verbal expressions. Though many know Common, and some study Sylvan or Gnomish, each kingdom uses a dialect of Continental, the “tongue and finger” of the Legacy’s founder. Native speakers must pass a DC 12 Literacy check to understand other dialects in full, while non-natives must pass a DC 17 check. Otherwise, embarrassing misunderstandings occur. Scholars wonder if fey inspired this verbal tapestry so that only love might speak to all.

The Legacy’s name hails from history. Twelve centuries past, polymath and traveler Chamartin Maximilian romanced a favor from lovely Nefriti, Mistress of Veils. He wished to reign ninety-nine years, to survive monsters and rivals and infirmity so that he might alleviate the people’s fears and unite them. And so he did with a motley band of courageous and honorable adventurers. Some speculate at Nefriti’s role: As fey have retreated, the dancing dead—neutral vampires and inquisitive ghouls—have found a splendid home in the Nine Kingdoms, though never to excess. Today, people honor Nefriti alongside nonevil deities.

Maximilian’s heirs could not hold one throne for long. Little wars, rumors of big ones, strategic marriages, impossible love affairs, betrayals and revolutions, assassinations and coronations, restorations and inquisitions—amid a chaotic mass of entanglements, or perhaps because of them, people have held to Maximilian’s legacy of artistry, faith, honor, and love.

Over centuries, descendants of Maximilian ensconced themselves as nobles by tapping their bloodline’s love affair with the undead. By the Great War’s dawn, the gulf had grown wide between rich and poor: the idle, odd, and fashionable versus the masses of toiling, hungry, and poor. Even as electrotech and other boons of industry, medicine, and science flourished elsewhere, the Legacy’s impoverished continued their simple, rigid lives on farms and in guilds. With the rise of printing presses, and fearing mass rebellion, nobles confiscated arms and art that might be critical or disruptive. Nobility became a vine strangling the Legacy’s fey muses. In part, the Great War was both a consequence and destroyer of the aristocracy.

War came quickly. For ages, lands to the north, beyond mountains, posed no concern. Even as fiends harnessed Gath, and refugees spoke of horrors, most felt safe. Alas, the mountains did not halt dirigibles, a mortal military could not outfox fiendish strategems, and stone churches were no havens against falling bombs. After Gath annexed Nerth, the Legacy’s aristocratic counselors pleaded peace. “A sad loss of our brother kingdom,” they said, “but how bad could it be?” The fiendish war-machine rolled on. At first, many poor aided the invaders, giving up nobles with glee, just to end their toil. Then true horrors sunk in.

After a mere nine months, 90 percent of the Legacy was under Gath’s iron fist or made desolate. Devil lords erected false courts, dreary factories, and conversion camps. The Commonweal and other neighbors could barely hold their own, much less help. Alchemical bombs burned the forests and fields of the fey and the rebels hiding therein. Of the original 160 million citizens, 65 million ultimately fought, 17 million died, and 21 million were crippled. Everyone knew someone who had felt loss.

In the darkest hour, as the last great city, d’Fey, quivered ready to fall, the faithful huddled in their grandest creation, the Cathedral of Light and Tears, a luminous stained-glass homage to the goddess Iris and the murder of her mortal lover, Tulbrune. Everyone prayed. But the priestesses knew that when a god intervenes directly in mortal affairs, the scales must balance. Good and evil, law and chaos, life and death, each beget the other. Thusly, the faithful took a leap and offered up themselves as sacrifices. Amid the bodies, a young girl, the lightbringer Joaria, stood alone to became a vessel for a cathedral-sized manifestation of Iris to smite and push back the fiendish armies. Under her divine banner, the Legacy’s military vestiges repelled the invaders, slew many fiends, and re-secured their heritage for peace.

A dozen years have passed. The Nine Kingdoms now gather as a unified assembly led by their new head-of-state, the young Ledegar Maximilian, the one true descendent of the Legacy’s founder. So oracles confirm. The nobility is stripped of their excess lands and wealth. A single coin smoothens trade. The people rejoice in peace even as they struggle at times to feed and cloth themselves. And behind the veneer, scheming fiends lurk, old rivalries simmer, the missing and collaborators remain at large, and bitter war wounds fester. Worst of all, the war birthed monsters, from hungry bulettes and hateful cambions to wandering ghosts and living spells.

Visitors are warmly welcome. There is great demand for labor and trade. With many widows and orphans—and those scarred in spirit, body or both—strong hands are needed to continue to rebuild from rubble, plant fields, repave roads, track traitors, smite fiends, hunt monsters, and run small electrotech factories “for Iris” popping up all over. Adventure awaits.
 
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