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"Realistic" things that no-one actually wants to deal with in fantasy games

Deptfordx

Registered User
Validated User
Re: Weapons vs Armour table. Allegedly even EGG himself didn't bother using it in his games.
 

Leonaru

Taxidermic Owlbear
Validated User
Nope. Most therianthropes could be hit by silver, and IIRC Wolfweres could be hit by cold iron, although I don't think that was ever defined. I swear there was one variant were thing that needed gold or magic to hit, but not what. Greatwr seawolf maybe. Or a Ravenloft werewolf with a French name.
It's indeed the greater loup-garou that can only be damaged by gold weapons.
 

Bwian

Retired User
I agree that flying mounts, etc should make for changes in the way things work. At least for those who can afford them. A flying cavalry unit could shake things up on the battlefield
I agree with this general idea, if the universe is one where e.g. Pegasi(?) resemble a real earth species in having a breeding population, ecological niche etc. This was the path taken fairly early in D&D, and also in many subsequent RPGs.

But in the e.g. the Greek myths, many of the 'mythical' creatures were monsters of some kind: either a) an individual or small family group of (possibly eternal) individuals, or b) a class of divine/ infernal 'servant' or 'child' beings, not really participating in the down-to-earth ecosystem. In each case the group has its own origin story, place in the divine family etc.; they often have specific divine/ universal function and exist in specific or inaccessible (sometimes mythical) locations, and don't really seem to breed (or at least not to breed true) or have a true ecological existence. I am thinking of e.g. Gorgons, minotaur, winged horses, stymphalian birds, the dragon that Jason overcomes in group (a); or cyclopes, furies in group (b). These monstrous/ divine creatures aren't really around in everyday life in such numbers that they are likely to change technology/ culture over a large part of the earth's surface. For these kinds of creatures, I don't see much reason for them to change military technology.

Exceptions certainly seem to exist in Greek myth, including possibly centaurs; so I can see how its horses for courses.
 

DarkStarling

Brilliantly Crazed
Validated User
I agree with this general idea, if the universe is one where e.g. Pegasi(?) resemble a real earth species in having a breeding population, ecological niche etc. This was the path taken fairly early in D&D, and also in many subsequent RPGs.

But in the e.g. the Greek myths, many of the 'mythical' creatures were monsters of some kind: either a) an individual or small family group of (possibly eternal) individuals, or b) a class of divine/ infernal 'servant' or 'child' beings, not really participating in the down-to-earth ecosystem. In each case the group has its own origin story, place in the divine family etc.; they often have specific divine/ universal function and exist in specific or inaccessible (sometimes mythical) locations, and don't really seem to breed (or at least not to breed true) or have a true ecological existence. I am thinking of e.g. Gorgons, minotaur, winged horses, stymphalian birds, the dragon that Jason overcomes in group (a); or cyclopes, furies in group (b). These monstrous/ divine creatures aren't really around in everyday life in such numbers that they are likely to change technology/ culture over a large part of the earth's surface. For these kinds of creatures, I don't see much reason for them to change military technology.

Exceptions certainly seem to exist in Greek myth, including possibly centaurs; so I can see how its horses for courses.
I’ve experimented a few times with re-mythologizing the bestiary. It’s actually a pretty interesting exercise.
 

WistfulD

Registered User
Validated User
But in the e.g. the Greek myths, many of the 'mythical' creatures were monsters of some kind: either a) an individual or small family group of (possibly eternal) individuals, or b) a class of divine/ infernal 'servant' or 'child' beings, not really participating in the down-to-earth ecosystem. In each case the group has its own origin story, place in the divine family etc.; they often have specific divine/ universal function and exist in specific or inaccessible (sometimes mythical) locations, and don't really seem to breed (or at least not to breed true) or have a true ecological existence.
One of the things that seems to have seeped into D&D that I don't know if was intended is the idea that everything is everywhere. I mean, yes, pegasi cavalry should absolutely change warfare and especially fortification design and a bunch of generic castle floorplans one might plop down in the middle of your map make no sense in a world with them. However, a lot of castles totally can have those floorplans because they have a cunning defense against pegasi troops -- 1200 miles from those guys with pegasi cavalry.
 

Drogo

Unrepentant Gamer
RPGnet Member
Validated User
1. "... the idea that everything is everywhere."

This is certainly a problem with the weapons & armor tables. It is all-inclusive, so you can set your campaign anywhere. But then you should XXX out the things that don't belong. Medieval plate armor wearing people did not use rapiers, scimitars or katanas. Neither did they use hide, lamellar or divers asian style armors.

2. "... pegasi cavalry should absolutely change warfare and especially fortification design."

A friend of mine once commented that most campaigns he played in folded up about the time that parties became powerfull enough for the mass-invisible, aerial assault.
 

mindstalk

Does the math.
Validated User
Medieval plate armor wearing people did not use rapiers, scimitars or katanas
AIUI plate and rapiers overlapped in time, but you probably wouldn't use a rapier while also wearing plate. Not sure what the difference between a scimitar and a European cavalry saber really is. Yeah, katanas weren't around in Europe. OTOH, most RPGs have a different cultural mix than the real world.
 

Dagor

Registered User
Validated User
AIUI plate and rapiers overlapped in time, but you probably wouldn't use a rapier while also wearing plate. Not sure what the difference between a scimitar and a European cavalry saber really is. Yeah, katanas weren't around in Europe. OTOH, most RPGs have a different cultural mix than the real world.
And if those cultures have been interacting for a while, then it stands to reason that they'd cross-pollinate. After all, both trade and just plain blatantly ripping off ideas you've seen elsewhere and like are things.
 

Reynard

Registered User
Validated User
One realistic thing that people seem to gloss over in gaming is religion. Yes, there are clerics and paladins and whatever, but the religious beliefs of PCs, particularly in culturally pre-modern settings, gets short shrift. Religion is extremely important to history, and was generally very important to individual people until very recently. We live in a mostly secular era and I think we have a hard time modeling how powerful something like the threat of excommunication could be.
 
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