"Realistic" things that no-one actually wants to deal with in fantasy games

Hituro

Eager Critmouse
Validated User
I never was able to run a game where all the money was real. It sounds like great fun. You must live where it is easier to get odd coins than I do. We get US and Canadian coins, and they often trade at par, regardless of the official exchange rate, but that is about it.
I lucked into a box of coins from a carboot sale to start with, I think that's where the old pennies and half-pennies came from. The three-pennies I bought specially, but they weren't very expensive. We also used modern 1p, 5p, and 10p coins (the later in small amounts), as well as gold (plastic) coins my wife had got from a LARP years before, and the random foreign coins — and yes, we live in Scotland, so it isn't hard.

I felt that having physical money entirely changed the players (and characters) attitude to wealth.
 

Gogmagog

Registered User
Validated User
I mean, I don't care what the player characters degree of religiosity is, because individuals have always had a pretty wide variety of levels of religious belief--even in pre-modern times you have plenty of individuals who just aren't that into religion, and player characters are exceptional individuals anyway. But I always put lots and lots of religion, religious organizations, churches, religious factions, cults, etc. into my RPG settings, because religion is interesting.
Being non-religious, that gets rather dicey in RPG-land since places like Forgotten Realms has The Wall of the Faithless so getting on your knees can boil down to basic 'Please don't grind me into bricks' mentality.
 

DarkStarling

Brilliantly Crazed
Banned
Validated User
I lucked into a box of coins from a carboot sale to start with, I think that's where the old pennies and half-pennies came from. The three-pennies I bought specially, but they weren't very expensive. We also used modern 1p, 5p, and 10p coins (the later in small amounts), as well as gold (plastic) coins my wife had got from a LARP years before, and the random foreign coins — and yes, we live in Scotland, so it isn't hard.

I felt that having physical money entirely changed the players (and characters) attitude to wealth.
I just bet it would. I really like that idea.

Being non-religious, that gets rather dicey in RPG-land since places like Forgotten Realms has The Wall of the Faithless so getting on your knees can boil down to basic 'Please don't grind me into bricks' mentality.
There's a campaign, an unjust cosmos like that where the PCs (possibly with the aid of Celestials and good gods, possibly not) set out to FIX that.

I'm reminded of a thread here where someone running a game had the big bad conspiring to free everyone from Hell and was surprised when the PCs, on discovering this, wanted to join him. Doesn't matter what they did, they still don't deserve it sort of thing.
 

Dagor

Registered User
Validated User
Being non-religious, that gets rather dicey in RPG-land since places like Forgotten Realms has The Wall of the Faithless so getting on your knees can boil down to basic 'Please don't grind me into bricks' mentality.
Ugh, don't remind me of that wall. While I'm willing to concede that it may not have been deliberately intended as a big slap in the face of any nonreligious players at the table, it still at the most charitable interpretation I can think of turns religion in the Realms into primarily just one big divine protection racket, and in any campaign of mine that might take place in that setting that abomination simply won't exist. I mean, it's not as though it was even needed -- the forces of evil and a fair few not-technically-evil-not-that-you'd-notice douchebags doubtlessly have their own schemes to trap unsuspecting souls going regardless of whether it's there or not.
 

Gogmagog

Registered User
Validated User
Ugh, don't remind me of that wall. While I'm willing to concede that it may not have been deliberately intended as a big slap in the face of any nonreligious players at the table, it still at the most charitable interpretation I can think of turns religion in the Realms into primarily just one big divine protection racket, and in any campaign of mine that might take place in that setting that abomination simply won't exist. I mean, it's not as though it was even needed -- the forces of evil and a fair few not-technically-evil-not-that-you'd-notice douchebags doubtlessly have their own schemes to trap unsuspecting souls going regardless of whether it's there or not.

I could see how worshipping a god does place you under their protection, with places like Sigil being a spot where those who opt out are sent and take their chances.


"Look, you qualify for Elysium, which is a pretty nice moderate place with spots you can sleep for centuries, eat great food, run around as you please and even contemplate the mysteries of the universe if you want. Opting out means any asshole daemon can grab you with no consequence if they find you."
 

That Other Guy

Registered User
Validated User
I think religions in fantasy RPGs could benefit a lot from embracing non-Western viewpoints of the world, particularly in kind of breaking down the idea that magic is a unnatural part of the world. Also the idea that who you worship affects where you go in the afterlife is a really weirdly idiosyncratic thing. Like, the gods may be judges, but the morality/ethos in a lot of cultures is an objective thing. The gods affect what happens to you in this world, not necessarily the rest
 

blaster219

Registered User
Validated User
Toilet facilities.

Not in the sense that no one ever takes a potty break on the Enterprise. But in the sense that toilet arrangements in a multi-species interstellar confederation must be horrifically complex to account for each member's unique biological and cultural needs.

Either that or the bathrooms on Federation starships are all basically mini holodecks.
 

Dagor

Registered User
Validated User
I think religions in fantasy RPGs could benefit a lot from embracing non-Western viewpoints of the world, particularly in kind of breaking down the idea that magic is a unnatural part of the world. Also the idea that who you worship affects where you go in the afterlife is a really weirdly idiosyncratic thing. Like, the gods may be judges, but the morality/ethos in a lot of cultures is an objective thing. The gods affect what happens to you in this world, not necessarily the rest
Yeah, the notion that all gods automatically also function as "death gods" with their own personal cordoned-off afterlives isn't something you really find in RL polytheism as far as I'm aware. That's pretty much a D&Dism (and perhaps to some extent informed by the whole folklore-Christian Heaven-or-Hell divide, although that is of course generally not considered polytheist) whereas the historical faiths seem to have remained content to leave the afterlife to the assigned specialists of their pantheon.

Either that or the bathrooms on Federation starships are all basically mini holodecks.
They have the tech. Might as well get some practical use out of it to make up for how often the big luxury suite goes haywire. :p
 

mindstalk

Does the math.
Validated User
Yeah, the notion that all gods automatically also function as "death gods" with their own personal cordoned-off afterlives isn't something you really find in RL polytheism as far as I'm aware. That's pretty much a D&Dism (and perhaps to some extent informed by the whole folklore-Christian Heaven-or-Hell divide, although that is of course generally not considered polytheist) whereas the historical faiths seem to have remained content to leave the afterlife to the assigned specialists of their pantheon.
Though it does make some sense for a pluralistic henotheist/monolatry setup. But yeah, in actual polytheism you 'worship'/sacrifice to all the gods, and if there's a differential afterlife it's based on general behavior (Elysian Fields/generic Hades/Tartarus; Valhalla/Hel).

Competitive monolatry isn't *wrong*, and makes sense if fantasy gods are actually powered by believers, but I don't know of any real culture it maps to.
 
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