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[Recruitment]13th Age, Dragon Empire created using Engine of the Ages

alisandar

Registered User
Validated User
I'm seeing a situation where the Elf Queen is still in control of the Queen's Wood but there are certain necromatic horrors still wandering around in there. The drow's copse is now a sight of blighted, twisted trees that seek to suck in souls and siphon them to the Lich King. There are treants that wander aimlessly, draped with rotting flesh and jangling bones. Banshees and rusalka haunt the rivers.

This all lead to the creation of the Wardens. One part Old West sheriff and one part Hero For Hire, Wardens are given wide mandates by the Elf Queen to wander her territory and deal with the problems created by the Lich King's incursion, as well as various other arcane horrors and twisted fey "humor."
The Lich King concurs.
 

Tedster

Vigilante of Love
Validated User
I'll give Shadow Hexagram Shadow Hexagram till Monday to chime in, but start considering the next stage over the weekend: Ending the Ages, and then Character Creation.

If you've got an idea for how the 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th Ages came to their ends, usually in calamitous fashion, throw your hat into the ring and we can confirm and embellish as we see fit.
 

Nate_MI

Hail Tzeentch!
Validated User
Obviously the 11th Age ended with an invasion by the gnosis demons, and the elves appearing to save everyone. I'll let other players jump in and give their ideas for the other Ages.
 

Tedster

Vigilante of Love
Validated User
Yes! That's been established. Also, if anyone wants to fill in casualties (cities or major players that died) in their Age-Enders, feel free to do so.
 

EnigmaticOne

Registered User
Validated User
Shadow Hexagram Shadow Hexagram last appeared 10 days ago. Hope nothing is wrong.

Obviously the 11th Age ended with an invasion by the gnosis demons, and the elves appearing to save everyone. I'll let other players jump in and give their ideas for the other Ages.
Outer Race of Gnosis. Nobody who said they were demons. Professor Darion might think that, but it's all speculation. Inspired nonsense, but nonsense all the same. :D

Yes! That's been established. Also, if anyone wants to fill in casualties (cities or major players that died) in their Age-Enders, feel free to do so.
The 10th Age ended when a great pandemic swept the land, killing multitudes, including the Emperor. Was it the Green/Poison Sage's last revenge against the world, given its unusual toxic symptoms? Or did something come up from the underground, borne by stygian creatures that made it to the surface?
 
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Tedster

Vigilante of Love
Validated User
Aye, just pick an Age that hasn't been destroyed and end it. If you've got any thoughts on the endings that have been proposed feel free to chime in.
 

Gralhruk

Crownless
Validated User
"The blight began with a strange crop of fish, apparently of the common Huring variety, yet rather than the typical steely blue coloration these were black as the heart of the Lich King. They dripped, too, an oil that was like unto squid ink yet more viscous, with a life unto its own. It is said that it was the perfect medium with which the scribes would record the demise of the 10th age, for the particulars have been rewritten numerous times such that the wheat is most difficult to separate from the chaff. In any case, the blight is undisputed - what started as a simple discoloration soon became apparent as a wasting disease amongst sea-creatures large and small - stemming, as it were, from that single crop netted and sold with Santa Cora's more traditional catch. During the incubation period, before the real danger became apparent, judicious intervention from the Priestess could likely have halted the progress of the disease, if it can be called as such.

"It should be noted that during this time, the reigning Priestess seems to have withdrawn from her typical behaviors. There are a number of sources which indicate she had taken significant interest in a mysterious stranger, who went about masked and cloaked. When the nature of the malady finally manifested itself in seas polluted with corpse-shoals of putrid sea creatures, many citizens had already ingested some form of the infected creatures. Nobility, in typical elitist fashion, had acquired a seemingly insatiable appetite for all things so blackened, so that their tables became monochromatic still life paintings. They were among the hardest hit when the blight swept through the citizenry proper.

"It is hypothesized by some that the Stranger had turned the Priestess from her followers, and in disapproval the gods sent this plague upon her city. Whatever the histories say, the populace seems to have felt much the same, for the peasants - hardier and less decimated than their ruling class - rose up and toppled the city, burning and smashing until eventually they found the Priestess herself and sacrificed her, the very symbol of the city, to appease the gods who had looked away from them.

"Ironically, the Stranger who had supposedly precipitated this entire mess, was never found or, apparently, even looked for. Where he went or why he appeared at all is completely unknown, and how such a seemingly obvious thing could be so monumentally overlooked is most strange . . ."

--Palace of the Silver Priestess, Womb of Horrors: an Account of the Factors Precipitating the Ending of the 10th Age, 1st edition, Dunsany & Druitt

"He came to me in the darkest part of the night, before the whores go shuffling home and after all the taverns - even ours - have snuffed their lights. Masked, I could see a glitter behind the eye slits and almost feel the merriment radiating off of him. I had only stayed their out of some fear I cannot name, with the glow of the burning city there on the horizon. It did not occur to me to question how he had entered, nor why he was there. Unasked, I brought him the best wine left behind the bar, though I knew father would lash me on the morrow. I could not help but stare at that frozen mask and think where he would go, now that Santa Cora was gone - for it was somehow obvious to me that was the place he had quit. I felt no fear, only a great lassitude, as though at the completion of some great task though I had done nothing out of the ordinary. I felt myself drawn into that mask, into those blank holes wherein his eyes must lay, as though into some dream. A forest of golden trees festooned with vines of silver, gemstone flowers littering the ground. Caverns of onyx and ebony shot through with copper, luminescent growth marking the walls in filigreed patterns. Palaces impossible tall, looking as delicate as the voluptuous princesses that manned them. Seas of wine and opium, tender flesh, avarice, all the vices of man laid out like a banquet and seeming, in that moment, the height of all that was possible. My mouth moved not but he heard my question. In answer I saw a flash from one eyehole and he shrugged behind the smiling mask, and I saw that anything was indeed possible when the slate was empty. I drank, as he then bade me, and what happened after I do not recall. Never did I see him again, but often I wonder . . . "

--Sins of the Innkeeper's Daughter, Tales from the Shadow of Vigil
 
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DannyK

One Shot Man
Validated User
"This is my testament as a halfling of respectable family and honest trade as a pie-maker all my years. They say now that them blackened eels and such is responsible for the great blight, but that ain't possible. Did you really think they put eels in every eel pie sold in Santa Cora's streets? We blackened 'em, sure, first with lamp-black and ink and later with all kinds of things, but most of the blightened fish weren't fit to eat, anyway. No, I tell you what cut down the flower o' the nobility and drove the common people to madness: venery. There was a pox as had never been seen before or since, brought to our lands by the elf-maids, or so they say. The dirty dogs rutted themselves to an early grave, and took many an honest man's wife down with them to hell. When they was all dead, the bakery business wasn't so lively neither, and we had to go back to farming the hills and livin' in holes and all that. Eh, pie-making's a filthy business."
--From the Testament of Rupert Greatsandal, Voices of the 10th Age, Suppressed First Edition
 
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