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Rolemaster, favorite game I've never played.

Gridlocked Morloc

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#1
Confession time, I just bought a 1st edition boxed set. It's sits proudly on the shelf next to my 1st edition Spell Law Box & AL/CL Box which sit proudly next to my 2nd edition box which sits next to the RMSS books and so on. But the half dozen time over the years I've tried to run the game I've give up in frustration; the AL charts and crit tables seem so cool but in play everything seems so slow and hard to organize we give up and go back to GURPS.

I know a lot of people still love this game. Can anyone share their techniques on how to make the game run smoothly at the table?
 

BlackSpike

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#3
I really enjoy RMSS.
It streamlines a lot of the rules.

Most of the fiddly-bits are done at character creation, and going up levels. In play, each player needs a copy of their weapon/critical charts, but most of the rest is easy enough.
 

bottg

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#4
I have run (and played) RM for ~30 years. It is very simple to run if you are organised. Get hold of pdf copies too (especially arms law) so that every player has their own combat tables. I printed the crit tables and put them in plastic pockets in a ring binder so that it was easy to have them to hand. Most of the complexity is front-loaded in that character creation takes a little while, but play is very fast.
The organisation of the early box sets was not great, but i would counter Soltakss and say play it, and you will probably love it!
 

Gridlocked Morloc

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#5
Thanks. Most of my group have laptops they bring now. I'm thinking with four laptops and multiple copies of Arms and Spell law I might convince them to give it another try.
 

Tom B

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#6
I played and ran RM2 for years. Then RMSS. After a while, we got a bit frustrated with the extra fiddliness of RMSS and went back to RM2. We were just careful about which Companions and options to allow. These days, I would undoubtedly use Rolemaster Classic. Once you're used to the rules, it goes really smoothly. Players have less to keep track of than the GM, but you'll find there are only a few charts you actually need, and the GM screen helps with that. A player usually only needs one or two weapon charts, so a copy of those with their character sheet and they're good to go. I found it far, far less fiddly than later iterations of D&D or Pathfinder for instance.

Don't try to track all the charts, just the ones you actually need. Makes things a lot easier.
 

bottg

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#7
Thanks. Most of my group have laptops they bring now. I'm thinking with four laptops and multiple copies of Arms and Spell law I might convince them to give it another try.
There is a liitle app available on dtrpg that calculates it all for you. I am on the tablet and cannot check but will shortly
 

PeterAmthor

Truly Rural
Validated User
#8
I played in a long term campaign for RM2 many years ago. When each player has the weapon and crit charts they need it does indeed flow a lot faster and once you get the hang of it things move along quicker than expected. Plus some of the crit chart rolls are absolutely great and hard to pull of in other games the way they do. However it was never a game I wanted to run, love crunch as a player but can't stand it as a GM.
 

Scurrilous

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#9
A big part of making RM run smoothly is using the action declaration phase and rolling initiative after it. This makes parrying work right, if you know whether you have initiative before you declare your parry you can use it reactively which makes it too effective. If you have the information from the action declaration phase, everyone can roll and total their attacks and look up their results at the same time instead of doing it sequentially.
 
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