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[Sci-Fi] Colony Ships?

Kredoc

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You may also want to take a look at B5 ships. Earth ships in the original series had rotating sections. They're probably not big enough for colony ships (except maybe the Explorer class), but they might give you some ideas.
 

baakyocalder

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B5 ships are found on the Babylon 5 wiki


Human ships might be in the Earth Alliance book, but it's hard to find many Babylon 5 RPG books as the license Mongoose had long since expired.
 

Tom B

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Here's the Navoo from The Expanse. Designed as a generation ship, it was later...repurposed.

 

Lundgren

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Just use a colony cylinder - either constructed or a hollowed out dwarf planet. For the hollowed out dwarf planet you're basically shoving colony cylinder inside the interior space, than counter rotating them, and sticking engines on the whole thing.
Having counter rotation is only needed if wanting to cancel out the gyroscopic effect, and I'm not so sure there is a need for that. If going with hard SF, the connection between the two would be a headache for a generation ship. After all, you can't take it to a shipyard and replace the bearings.

When looking at the O'Neill cylinder on Wikipedia, they used counter rotation cylinders to turn the station 360 degrees per orbit. So to me, it sounds like they were designing a space station where they wanted the nose to point in the direction of the movement. The purpose seems to have been to have the side to always be oriented toward the sun. I can have misunderstood the purpose, but if not, just point the nose parallel of the rotation axis and go sideways.
 

Doctor Guilty

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So maybe if you could go into how the wormhole tech works from this perspective, it'd inform suggestions.
Sure. The how of FTL travel in Heavy Gear goes like this:
A spatial discontinuity called a Tannhauser gate is blasted with a particle accelerator the size of the Chrysler Building. After about a day of intense bombardment, the gate opens and ships pass trough it to the other side. The transit takes about a minute. The ships emerge either in open space (requiring a second gate to travel any farther) or in the extreme outer edge of a star system, where conventional drives are required. The transit between a gate and the world is only ever described as “a few weeks” (that part of the rules was unusually incomplete), but a total journey might take months. The passengers are put in suspended animation to keep life support needs to a minimum.

So as far as this goes, a generation ship is strictly unnecessary, but something that size would be useful as an advance base.
If you're not already familiar with the Expanse, zoom in on the tip of the front probe.
It’s a statue, isn’t it? I’ve only seen five minutes of one episode.
 

TheMouse

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Depending on what they mean by the outer edge of a star system, that could be anywhere from maybe 100 to well over 100,000 or more AU from the star in question. Heavy Gear was developed in an era in which the outer edge of a star system would probably have been thought of as past the planets rather than past the Oort cloud. So let's say that's something like 100 AU in a few weeks. Plus all the effort of getting your angular momentum to equal that of your target planet so that you can consider orbital insertion.

Either way, that speed is a tiny fraction of C. So you have to worry about impacts, but not nearly so much as someone flying around at like 0.2C does. So you're probably still going to end up with as boring a cylinder as you can, but with more room to mess around.

Since everyone is on ice, you basically only need to worry about gravity and stuff once you arrive. So your ship will probably be designed to spit out spinning orbital habs at the destination. Then you wake everyone up in 0 G, get them medically stable, and get them onto the habs.

Neat thing about orbiting habitats is that they don't need to be solid. You can have a core with wire spokes that stick out to connect to individual pressurized sections. Then those rooms are connected by a ring of other cables that act as both structural support and transportation between sections. You can build full rings later on, but this is a fast and easy way to transition, because you can store the things with the structural cables wound up, so the things just sit in your ship in a folded up form; in an emergency, you can even activate the life support systems while they're still in your transit ship so that you can use them as a safe fallback.

I guess my answer is: Your ship is going to look kind of like a pencil. The eraser is the front, and it's got extra shielding for when you smack into things while moving fairly quickly through space. Then there'll be a bunch of compartments up and down the sides that can pop open to spit out orbital habs that'll unfurl and start to spin up. Plus lots of smaller compartments that'll spit out ships, satellites, drones, solar power stations, etc.
 

Sirharrok

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Sure. The how of FTL travel in Heavy Gear goes like this:
A spatial discontinuity called a Tannhauser gate is blasted with a particle accelerator the size of the Chrysler Building. After about a day of intense bombardment, the gate opens and ships pass trough it to the other side. The transit takes about a minute. The ships emerge either in open space (requiring a second gate to travel any farther) or in the extreme outer edge of a star system, where conventional drives are required. The transit between a gate and the world is only ever described as “a few weeks” (that part of the rules was unusually incomplete), but a total journey might take months. The passengers are put in suspended animation to keep life support needs to a minimum.

So as far as this goes, a generation ship is strictly unnecessary, but something that size would be useful as an advance base.

It’s a statue, isn’t it? I’ve only seen five minutes of one episode.
Yes, but why would you put one there?

(This is by way of encouraging people to watch the series. It's awesome)
 
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