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SCION - Second Edition: Opinions?

eskatonic

Still the Prettiest.
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I got an email saying Scion: Second Edition was available at drivethrurpg.com. I have always been interested in Scion, but the first edition was, to quote Sarah McLachlan, "a beautiful f***ked up mess." Wonderful concept, borked ruleset.

Before I take the plunge, I was hoping some of y'all might have taken that first step before me, and could maybe give your opinions, reviews, and comparisons between 1st and 2nd.
 

Strange Visitor

Grumpy Grognard
Validated User
In many respects its a vast improvement over 1e. Unfortunately, there are a couple of things about it I just can't make myself like to the point of them being dealbreakers, and one isn't easy to fix without bringing back one of 1e's notorious problems.
 

Wraithdrit

New member
In many respects its a vast improvement over 1e. Unfortunately, there are a couple of things about it I just can't make myself like to the point of them being dealbreakers, and one isn't easy to fix without bringing back one of 1e's notorious problems.
Could you be more specific? Might help persuade people to try it cause they don't care or stay away because they do care.
 

IanWatson

Pharos
Validated User
Before I take the plunge, I was hoping some of y'all might have taken that first step before me, and could maybe give your opinions, reviews, and comparisons between 1st and 2nd.
I'll try to refrain from commenting too much on my opinions, since I'm obviously biased.

Scion 2e no longer uses the Exalted 2e variant of the Storyteller system. Instead, it uses the new Storypath system created by Onyx Path. It's still a d10 dice pool system, so you'll find a lot that's familiar about it, but it's a new thing. It was built from the ground up with the intent that it'd be able to handle the different scales of power that come into play in games like Scion and Aberrant. Epic Attributes and Mega Attributes were famously pretty broken in many ways, and those systems (or the elements of the engine that replace those systems) work a lot more like they're supposed to, in a way that better emulates mythic stories and action-adventure narratives.

I'm not too familiar with 1e's setting, but from what I've heard it was a pretty vague thing. 2e's setting is more concrete, with a lot more explicit settings and dials to make it more the game that you want to play. The pantheons represented are done with a better eye to research.

And fiction by Wicked + Divine's Kieron Gillen.
 

gpsych

Registered User
Validated User
I really really want to love it. So far I’ve only read Origin and I’m having a really hard time wrapping my brain around the “all myths are true” even when they contradict each other. The earth literally rests on the back of a giant turtle. The nine realms of Norse myth are also there, etc. Maybe I’ll get it more after I read Hero.

I’m also somewhat concerned with the sheer amount of stuff going on with each roll: success, complications, twists of fate, and stunts all on one roll? Whew. Seems like a huge amount of creative energy needed for each die roll. I haven’t played it yet though, so it could be that it’s less of a problem than I think.
 

NeoSamurai

Registered User
Validated User
I like it. I think the Storypath system is a vast improvement over the previous one. My only dissonance with it is the new interpretation of "The World" and some of the writing decisions in presenting the Pantheons in Hero. The Devi pantheon puts more prose towards invocation/praying rather than for GM playability. For the Pantheon pictures, it's hard to identify which deity is which because of poor description or lack of description of identifying features. despite those things I find negative, I like 2e more than not.
 

The Red Baron

Because I gotta kill fast and bullets are too slow
Validated User
I really really want to love it. So far I’ve only read Origin and I’m having a really hard time wrapping my brain around the “all myths are true” even when they contradict each other. The earth literally rests on the back of a giant turtle. The nine realms of Norse myth are also there, etc. Maybe I’ll get it more after I read Hero.
Think of it this way: the World is just like ours, but if you go looking for the mythical, you'll find it. If you go looking for the mythical stuff that contradicts other stuff, you'll inexplicably find that too. We go into this a little bit in Hero: when a new pantheon ascends, they have the option of weaving a Creation Myth that overwrites part of the World so that they were always there. We also open the door to prehistoric pantheons, but that's beyond the scope of most books.

I’m also somewhat concerned with the sheer amount of stuff going on with each roll: success, complications, twists of fate, and stunts all on one roll? Whew. Seems like a huge amount of creative energy needed for each die roll. I haven’t played it yet though, so it could be that it’s less of a problem than I think.
Your dice pool is always pretty much the same. The Storyguide sets the Difficulty, or the number of successes you need to roll. Meet that number and succeed, and if you get more successes, you can buy some loose narrative control or defined narrative control (Stunts). If you fail because of a specific thing blocking you (Complications) you suffer those penalties; otherwise, you can either fail forward (succeed at a later cost) or just fail (and build up the group resource that allows for explosive dice pools).

That's it. That's all there really is to Storypath.
 

That Old Tree

ಠ__ಠ
Validated User
The setting writing which, uh, exists in volume this edition, is not all just left up to airily implied tatters hung on monster descriptions. Though some people obviously don't like the approach, they've decided on certain truths about the setting and then talked about them and how they impact the setting, instead of leaving it entirely up to the ST to figure out. I has something to say.

The rules are pretty good! They strongest resemblance to 1E is just the usual StoryX "pool of d10s based on Trait + Trait." All the cool powers are concentrated in either Knacks (innate powers arising from the archetypes you fall under), and Purviews and Boons which organize the more overt divine powers in a way similar to 1E (though it's not a weird 1-10 scale that you can nevertheless jump around in). There's none of that giant numbers game that ran away with 1E. Epic Attributes don't exist, but you can still build up big advantages over others if you want to smash them, through bonus-seeking and Scale (differences in power, whether thanks to huge size, great speed, or just being More Divine). However, you're typically looking at a few post-roll bonus successes unless the difference is staggering (in which case, why is this happening exactly?), and while getting beaten up can still suck, taking some knocks is not nearly as punishing as older StoryX games.

Unfortunately the rules writing and layout are a little choppy, so it can be hard to synthesize, but it's not like it's an arcane mess, and it's a good game with a ton to offer.
 

RAM

Registered User
Validated User
My biggest problem with 1E was the lack of organization. I wanted to love the game and tried to run a campaign but the sheer jumbled nature of it all defeated me.
 
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