Screw it, I'm going to read my whole collection!

SrGrvsaLot

Digital Scribe
Validated User
The AD&D Dungeon Master's Guide is done

http://www.itcamefromthebookshelf.com/2019/01/advanced-dungeons-dragons-dungeon.html

My assessment was not favorable. I expect it's the sort of thing I would eventually mellow to with repeated exposure, but it mostly wound up annoying me.

Next up is the Monster Manual, just to round out the three cores.

http://www.itcamefromthebookshelf.com/2019/01/advanced-dungeons-and-dragons-monster.html

After this, what should I do? I'm eager to read Changeling 2e, but I'm also kind of curious about the changes to AD&D 2nd edition (plus, with Changeling, I don't know if I should go Dreaming - Lost 1 - Lost 2 or just Lost 1 - Lost 2).
 

Grantanz

Registered User
Validated User
Still at it.

http://www.itcamefromthebookshelf.com/2018/12/mage-awakening-2nd-edition-reaction.html

No particular reason this one took so long. Last couple of weeks have just been super hectic.

Not sure what I'm going to read next. I got a couple of new books over the holiday that are tempting me. And it certainly feels appropriate to read Testament this time of year, but going backwards in editions actually did not pan out the way I thought it would. So reading it before the 3rd edition core book isn't such a good idea.

I guess that means that AD&D 1st edition is my next move. Unless someone has a better idea.
I'm reading this at the moment, so it was interesting to see your thoughts. One thing I found was that the Paths/Orders that called to me in 1e were not the ones that called to me in 2e (though maybe that's just me); this time around I got the vibe of Obrimos as a sorcerer-scientist who could see and control the source code underlying reality, Neo-style. In 1e, they came across as the kind-of-priesty ones, which I did not find as cool.
 

SrGrvsaLot

Digital Scribe
Validated User
I'm reading this at the moment, so it was interesting to see your thoughts. One thing I found was that the Paths/Orders that called to me in 1e were not the ones that called to me in 2e (though maybe that's just me); this time around I got the vibe of Obrimos as a sorcerer-scientist who could see and control the source code underlying reality, Neo-style. In 1e, they came across as the kind-of-priesty ones, which I did not find as cool.
You know, it had been so long since I read Awaken 1e, that I completely missed the shift in canon. That's a pretty strong argument for reading the editions in order.
 

SrGrvsaLot

Digital Scribe
Validated User
Finished the AD&D 1st Monster Manual

http://www.itcamefromthebookshelf.com/2019/01/advanced-dungeons-dragons-monster.html

This is probably the first AD&D book that I unreservedly liked. I've got a good feeling about the 2nd edition MM.

Next up is Changeling: The Lost, first 1st Edition, then 2nd

http://www.itcamefromthebookshelf.com/2019/01/changeling-lost-1st-edition-core.html

If I'm going to do this absolutely right, I should read the supplements before the 2nd edition core, but I didn't do that for Vampire and it worked out just fine, so I'm not worried about it here.
 

SrGrvsaLot

Digital Scribe
Validated User
Finished the Changeling: The Lost core

http://www.itcamefromthebookshelf.com/2019/01/changeling-lost-1st-edition-core_14.html

I get pretty speculative here. I'm sure there will be plenty who disagree with my take.

Haven't decided what's next. Going straight into a new edition of Lost doesn't sound as appealing to me as it did a week ago, but I still really want to get to it soon.

Also, I'm having second thoughts about my format. I'd really like to average a new post every 2-3 days, but that's too short a span for the long books and too long a span for the short ones. Maybe if I tackled the long ones with a chapter-by-chapter breakdown? But would that get too spammy?

I'll sleep on it.
 

FrivYeti

Yeti On The Lam!
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I get pretty speculative here. I'm sure there will be plenty who disagree with my take.
It's interesting that you discuss the Fae as 'abusive parents'. One of the things I remember reading about Changeling 2E is that several of its changes were driven by a feeling among the writers that people who read 1E came away thinking of the Fae as much more human than was intended - they were supposed to be less "people trying to make you something" and more "the combined horrors of a largely incomprehensible universe".

Essentially, that changelings were meant to be trauma survivors more than abuse survivors specifically, which is a somewhat broader field of ways in which the universe can fuck you up.
 

SrGrvsaLot

Digital Scribe
Validated User
It's interesting that you discuss the Fae as 'abusive parents'. One of the things I remember reading about Changeling 2E is that several of its changes were driven by a feeling among the writers that people who read 1E came away thinking of the Fae as much more human than was intended - they were supposed to be less "people trying to make you something" and more "the combined horrors of a largely incomprehensible universe".

Essentially, that changelings were meant to be trauma survivors more than abuse survivors specifically, which is a somewhat broader field of ways in which the universe can fuck you up.
"Abusive parents" is a valid read, and it's likely that I wasn't clear, but that's not actually the point I was trying to make. My point was that the Durance itself was like a total regression to childhood, and that the Keepers, as the ones who understand the rules to this new place, must take the role of surrogate parents. And whether they are abusive or not is kind of immaterial to the horror of the place, because to be a child is to not understand ones own parents, to be subject to arbitrary rules that operate on a logic you can't see, to be at the mercy of moods you can neither predict nor explain, to rely utterly on these unchallangeably superior beings and to have no frame of reference for whether they're doing you good or ill.

Your mother tells you to eat your vegetables and it is an ordeal. They taste bitter and they're a weird green color, but she says they'll help you grow up strong. A Fae Keeper puts you in a giant candelabra and sets you on fire until your flesh melts like wax, but at the end of it you have the ability to control flames.

The Fae experience is heightened. It's grotesque in its details. But the horror doesn't come (mainly) from the torture. The horror comes from the tyranny of ignorance. The tyranny of helplessness. The tyranny of being a child.
 

ESkemp

Registered User
Validated User
I could go into some length as to why Lost is so very different from Dreaming, but the shorthand is, as you guessed, "different teams." And by that point we had more confidence in the approach of making nWoD games that were farther from their cWoD counterparts.

I can't speak for all authors, but personally childhood wasn't a consciously strong motif for me. Obviously it's a motif in a genre based on children's stories, but I'm not a parent and had a pretty great childhood. C:tL was for me a chance to build a creepy take on folklore with players taking the role of one-half brave and clever protagonists, one-half the monsters. It just wound up being something bigger the more the incredibly talented authors put into it.

And yeah, I didn't do a great job with the subject of mental illness. I do love the idea of overlapping realities and the difficulty discerning between them, but I wasn't awfully sensitive about the topic at the time.
 

SrGrvsaLot

Digital Scribe
Validated User
I could go into some length as to why Lost is so very different from Dreaming, but the shorthand is, as you guessed, "different teams." And by that point we had more confidence in the approach of making nWoD games that were farther from their cWoD counterparts.

I can't speak for all authors, but personally childhood wasn't a consciously strong motif for me. Obviously it's a motif in a genre based on children's stories, but I'm not a parent and had a pretty great childhood. C:tL was for me a chance to build a creepy take on folklore with players taking the role of one-half brave and clever protagonists, one-half the monsters. It just wound up being something bigger the more the incredibly talented authors put into it.

And yeah, I didn't do a great job with the subject of mental illness. I do love the idea of overlapping realities and the difficulty discerning between them, but I wasn't awfully sensitive about the topic at the time.
There's a slight possibility that I read more into it than was actually there. I do that sometimes. Check out my previous blog, where I inexplicably contend that Jet Set Radio is a devastating critique of capitalism.
 
Top Bottom