Self-created monsters.

GorgoneionCollective

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Validated User
#1
So, I want to pose a question to everyone, because I'm having a hard time thinking of it. The short form question is here - and please, RT if you would like:
In brief or for those who do not use twitter, the question is this:

In Janus, most monsters are created by being wronged by another. The curse is levied by someone who has acted terribly against another. My defining example would be Medusa, created by her rape in Athena's temple. Athena transformed her into a monster, but the villain and curse-giver was her rapist, because Athena's action was to protect Medusa from further harm. In Janus, generally the better resolution is for the players to break the curse by causing a reconcilation or public recognition of the wrongdoer's actions, though other options (E.G. "Fuck it, we don't know who's at fault, it's time for spears and axes" or "Ehh, we think the monster is doing good work. Let them go about their business.")

That's not always the case, though. Sometimes, the curse is self-inflicted. Dracula is an example of this: he cursed God out of grief, and became a monster. His condition is, fundamentally, of his own making. Doesn't mean there aren't ways to break the curse other than murder, it just means the kind of investigation will be different.

So my question is this: what other self-created monsters can you think of?

I should also specify: I am thinking primarily of mythological monsters/creatures, not the creations of science. So Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde, The Invisible Man, etc do not count. Golem type creations (including Frankenstein's Monster/Adam) are things that exist, however, because they're either turned violent through the arrogance of their creators (the Monster) or go rogue due to the wrath of their makers (MANY Golem stories).
 

Arethusa

Sophipygian
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#2
I doubt it’s what you’re looking for, but this has reminded me of a remarkable little children’s book I read many years ago called “Zeee”, about a self-created fairy and her tribulations at the hands of humans. The illustrations in the 1966 edition were incredible.
 

eeldip

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Validated User
#4
the lich and, more obscurely the chonchon, are examples of this. both are magi that want to take it to the next level of wizarding, and in doing so, turn into monsters. hubris punishment.
 

GorgoneionCollective

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#5
Oh, Liches are a good call. Can you give me a link or description of the chonchon, eeldip eeldip - or a bibliography? I specifically want more native/south american references for such things, but Wikipedia's links are woefully anemic. One of my big blind spots is native/south american myth, and I know some people who can help me with that, but since I can't pay them (yet), I am loathe to engage them until I know more about the specific myths I need to research.

P.S. can read Spanish, if you have bibliographies in that language.
 

eeldip

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#9
its an Appendix N book, but didn't really seem to influence D&D much as far as I can tell. much different tone... way more borgesian. ;)
 

Psalmanazar

A Friend And Boy
Validated User
#10
on mobile so it's annoying to type too much, but:

fafnir turned himself into a dragon out of greed.

In certain European and Native American traditions, werewolves or skinwalkers willingly transform themselves using magic pelts

Lamia is complicated. She was cursed by Hera, but some sources have the curse just being the death of her kids, and then she turned into a baby-eating snake monster out of grief and fury.
 
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