Sell me on Keyforge

Gaffa

Fallen Writer
Validated User
#11
If you can't find Keyforge right now, you might have to wait a while. It's a runaway smash hit for FFG, and they have already moved every unit from their first printing, as well as the second printing they had ready and waiting predicting it would be a hit. The game is selling at Magic: the Gathering levels currently, so it's basically out of stock everywhere. I can confirm that Barnes & Noble carries it; whether your local store has any in stock is another question.

There's no doubt that FFG will reprint this first set, but it might be a month or more before it filters out into stores.
 

Chikahiro

Neo•Geo Fanboy
Validated User
#12
Its all computer generated, isn't it? So its less a reprint so much as making more sets (however the heck that happens), no?
 

Gaffa

Fallen Writer
Validated User
#13
Its all computer generated, isn't it? So its less a reprint so much as making more sets (however the heck that happens), no?
It's produced by an algorithm, yes, but that doesn't mean they don't have to wait for their turn on the limited number of presses run from whatever Chinese printer is doing their printing for them.
 

PMAvers

Registered User
Validated User
#14
Surprisingly, I was under the impression that it's actually being printed in Germany, due to the tech required. So while we still have to wait for it to get shipped across a ocean, it might come a little faster.
 

Vargen

Registered User
Validated User
#15
Its all computer generated, isn't it? So its less a reprint so much as making more sets (however the heck that happens), no?
My understanding is they designed the card set like they would for a traditional tcg and had the computer build the decks procedurally from there.
 

Chikahiro

Neo•Geo Fanboy
Validated User
#16
It's produced by an algorithm, yes, but that doesn't mean they don't have to wait for their turn on the limited number of presses run from whatever Chinese printer is doing their printing for them.
Gotcha. I'm thinking more creating the new content, doing whatever additional quality assurance they have to do, all the backend work, etc. So, its nowhere nearly as quick and simple as just a reprint so I'm thinking of adding at least another month to my expected wait time :/
 

dbm

Registered User
Validated User
#17
So, I'm seeing stuff about it, and thought it was sort of gimmicky until I read a review on Ars. So, now I'm actually interested.

I like Magic: The Gathering but hate "the chase." I like deckbuilding games a lot, like DC, Puzzle Strike, Ascension, etc. I don't mind buying sets for my friends to get us started. I like variety.

Uhm... not sure what else to say! If its kid friendly (like, kids under 10) that's a massive huge awesome plus.
We played some initial games over the Christmas period with the starter decks. I come from a similar place to you, except in my case it was Hearthstone that I was enjoying until the deck optimisation made the game in general unfun (to me) unless I was willing to buy-in to some ‘standard’ uber cards.

Keyforged was fun, with nuances in the way it plays that will take some time to get ones head around. The fact that the win condition for the game is earning AEmber to create keys and not destroying you opponent radically changes the game, to my mind. We had situations where battle lines might get formed and one side could bash the other but that didn’t actually move either towards winning...

It’s hard to say how kid-friendly the game would be. Do the kids you have in mind already play games like MTG or Hearthstone? If so, no problem. Otherwise, the cards do need careful reading to play correctly and you need to be quite disciplined in how you run your cards and the tun sequence so that everything works as it should.

Did I enjoy it? Put it this way, I bought some more decks for our ‘stable’ after playing...
 

Gaffa

Fallen Writer
Validated User
#18
Keyforged was fun, with nuances in the way it plays that will take some time to get ones head around. The fact that the win condition for the game is earning AEmber to create keys and not destroying you opponent radically changes the game, to my mind. We had situations where battle lines might get formed and one side could bash the other but that didn’t actually move either towards winning...
Battle lines in Keyforge usually means that one side better start swinging to eat into the board parity, because your opponent being able to reap for 6+ amber a turn is a nasty place to find yourself in, I've found. In fact, Brobnar's main purpose is to be big swingy board control bruisers while your other houses make the aember for you.

As far as teaching it to kids, I bought it for my 12 and 15 year old nephew and niece, and they love it beyond reason.
 

Robert A. Rodger

Aspiring Kermit
Validated User
#19
I really like that one side having a huge battle line doesn't mean the game is over or unwinnable for the other player. There are so many board wipes and weird things that can happen it's so much fun when someone comes in with the wrong mindset, puts out all their creatures and I still win because my deck just does something different. I mean, yeah, usually if there are 5 or 6 creatures out you have to do something, but often there's still something to be done.
 
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