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Sell me on Malifaux!

gribble

Registered User
Validated User
#11
Hopefully the OP doesn't mind too much, but while we're talking Malifaux, what's people's take on the companion game, The Other Side?
Bear in mind this is mostly conjecture, because although I'm a backer, my box of stuff arrived just before Christmas, and I haven't had time to get it all based/table ready and play any games.

But in general it reads a lot like cleaned up (i.e. streamlined for size) Malifaux.
In terms of size, it is approx 50 models per side, and it also isn't. Wyrd played a pretty clever trick where although you play with units of 9 models, they are broken into 3 fireteams (each 3 models on a single base), and the fireteam is really the same thing as a typical "model" in other larger scale games (40k, WM/H). They each move and shoot independently (while having to remain in "formation" with other fireteams in the unit), and the actual models represent the "hit points" of each fireteam.
So really, instead of 4-5 units of 10 models each and a handful of single models, you're dealing with 4-5 units of 3 "fireteams" and a handful of single model fireteams. So you still only really have to deal with around 15-20 entities each turn... That ends up feeling much faster and more manageable in play, while still having that "big army fights" look and feel. It's a pretty ingenious solution.
The other main difference (apart from scale) is that each unit has a basic side of the stat card and a "glory" (i.e. supercharged) side. The various conditions for gaining glory differ for each faction, along with a number of other faction specific rules all on a single card, making each faction feel very different in play.

I'm very much looking forward to having models ready to go and trying it out on the table.
 

jimthegray

Registered User
Validated User
#12
Bear in mind this is mostly conjecture, because although I'm a backer, my box of stuff arrived just before Christmas, and I haven't had time to get it all based/table ready and play any games.

But in general it reads a lot like cleaned up (i.e. streamlined for size) Malifaux.
In terms of size, it is approx 50 models per side, and it also isn't. Wyrd played a pretty clever trick where although you play with units of 9 models, they are broken into 3 fireteams (each 3 models on a single base), and the fireteam is really the same thing as a typical "model" in other larger scale games (40k, WM/H). They each move and shoot independently (while having to remain in "formation" with other fireteams in the unit), and the actual models represent the "hit points" of each fireteam.
So really, instead of 4-5 units of 10 models each and a handful of single models, you're dealing with 4-5 units of 3 "fireteams" and a handful of single model fireteams. So you still only really have to deal with around 15-20 entities each turn... That ends up feeling much faster and more manageable in play, while still having that "big army fights" look and feel. It's a pretty ingenious solution.
The other main difference (apart from scale) is that each unit has a basic side of the stat card and a "glory" (i.e. supercharged) side. The various conditions for gaining glory differ for each faction, along with a number of other faction specific rules all on a single card, making each faction feel very different in play.

I'm very much looking forward to having models ready to go and trying it out on the table.
 

jimthegray

Registered User
Validated User
#13
I really like that the minis are assembled, same with a song of fire and ice , I have so many games in the shelf that I have not had a chance to assemble , but having the assembled makes it much easier to get into imho
 

gribble

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Validated User
#14
I really like that the minis are assembled, same with a song of fire and ice , I have so many games in the shelf that I have not had a chance to assemble , but having the assembled makes it much easier to get into imho
That's the theory. Unfortunately, due to not being based (and me wanting to pin the models as the connection points aren't great in some cases, and I imagine the constant plugging and unplugging of models into fireteam bases will put more stress on the connection than usual), and a few other bits and pieces having broken off, TOS unfortunately isn't quite as "crack open the box and play" as I had expected. Still, it's much better than having to actually fully assemble ~50 minis before playing.
 

jimthegray

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Validated User
#15
Yeah. No issues so far lucky for me other then finding a game , but got to play my xmas gift song of ice and fire Sunday:) also going to use the other side minis for through the breach. If I can get my players to try it
 

Houlio

Gauche
Validated User
#16
Malifaux was my previous commubity’s game of choice. I really liked it over the other options at the time, as the objective play tends to be incredibly varied and interesting. As one of my friends once told me, it isn’t unusual to win the game and be tabled. Some particular masters and crews could be frustrating to new players, specifically summoners (virtually all resurrectionists) and ranged-heavy crews (like Perdita in the guild), but those aren’t insurmountable issues by any means. I remember there being quite an imbalance in the skill required to make certain masters and play styles work right out of the box, so trying to do some research on mechanics and play styles beforehand is more important than picking “what looks cool” imo.
 

gribble

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Validated User
#17
I remember there being quite an imbalance in the skill required to make certain masters and play styles work right out of the box, so trying to do some research on mechanics and play styles beforehand is more important than picking “what looks cool” imo.
Yeah, I agree, and this bears repeating because a lot of Malifaux beginner advice is typically "grab a box that looks cool, and go from there". This is fine for games like 40k and WM/H, where playstyles vary, but largely are some variation of how do you "kill things and hold/deny these points on the table"?
Malifaux crews can drastically vary in the way they work, from small elite crews, to hordes, to summoners, to marker and model manipulators, to condition manipulators and lots in between. Each plays very differently and more importantly wins games differently. So it's very important that your initial crew matches your preferred playstyle(s), or you'll end up frustrated because you're trying to play in ways they're just not intended to work.
 

gribble

Registered User
Validated User
#19
What does that mean?
It means your opponent can wipe out all of your models, and you can still win (because despite losing all your dudes, you still accomplished the objectives better).
I wouldn't say it's a *common* occurrence in Malifaux, but it can happen and unlike pretty much every other wargame it's at least possible. What's much more likely is that you'll lose 80% of your crew, but still pull off a win. That kind of thing happens all the time. :)
With pretty much every other game, your objective (either directly or indirectly) is to kill your opponents dudes. With Malifaux, killing your opponents dudes is only useful in so far as it allows you to accomplish your objectives, and denies your opponent from accomplishing theirs. Killing your opponents models can actually be harmful to your chances of winning, something I haven't seen in any other wargame (there are some objectives that give you VP when your opponent kills one or more of your dudes for example, or others which require your opponent to have models alive so you can score from them).
It certainly requires a bit of time to adjust, coming from other wargames. I've noticed there are at least 3 phases to learning Malifaux. Phase 1 is when you play it like any other game and just try to kill all your opponents models. Phase 2 is when you start focusing more on scoring VP than killing. Phase 3 is when you start to focus on denying your opponent VP. That's when you've really started to master Malifaux.
 
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