💀 Necro [+] Sell me on Redemption: A Game of Tactics and Consequences

SeekerJST

Silent Spirits
RPGnet Member
Validated User
If nothing else it taught us we needed to put a little more work into how psionics functioned during space combat...
"I astrally project to the enemy ship's bridge and slaughter everyone there!!!"

Edit: Speaking of which, Kat (the character in question) was an excellent example of the consequences part of the title, she started out a not entirely together attack dog and wound up a not quite there paladin as events both past and present caught up with her. It was a fun evolution to watch.
 
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SirJalinth

Ortillery, my best Friend
Validated User
"I stuck my brain in it again."

Sorry for my character being so infuriating to your character, Jalinth.
Well you certainly made sure Seeker and Hawk had a better idea of what answers to put in the book in case people got... enthused with Psionic information gathering. :)

If nothing else it taught us we needed to put a little more work into how psionics functioned during space combat...
"I astrally project to the enemy ship's bridge and slaughter everyone there!!!"

Edit: Speaking of which, Kat (the character in question) was an excellent example of the consequences part of the title, she started out a not entirely together attack dog and wound up a not quite there paladin as events both past and present caught up with her. It was a fun evolution to watch.
I do really like how well changing of tags over the course of play helped with the development of both Kat and Jack. For all the ulcers they gave my character, they both had quite the arc.
 

DrunkenGrognard

Exile to the godforsaken reaches of the North
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Ah, Specialist Katerine Van. Dear Christ she was fun to play, and the character arc she went through really did sort of flow out of the events as they transpired.

At the start... yeah, Kat was more or less an attack dog; only still in the navy because, well, there's a war on, and if you have a combat psionic who can be described as a living artillery piece it behooves you to keep her somewhere you can at least point her towards the enemy. She was vicious, believed in there being no kill like overkill (and in the case of AOEing the enemy bridge crew down, hell, Seeker, at the time you stated that someone in the other playtest campaign tried the exact same thing. Now, astrally projecting into the enemy missile bays and attempting to detonate their mags while still inside the ship... THAT was all Kat). Kat was touchy, definitely not entirely sane, scared the shit out of people on her own side(I can recall a couple of occasions where Kat's actions caused friendly NPCs to shy away from her) and never met a way to kill people with her brain she didn't like. Early in the Gap campaign, we spotted a new way to kill people with one's brain; one that had a number of hilariously potent tricks in it, and Kat made it her personal goal to learn how it worked and how to do it as fast as possible.

Then, shortly after just barely surviving said method of killing people with one's brain, she figured out what it actually did to cause the spectacular effects it had(further details are spoilers, and will be avoided). And Kat realized that there were some evils she would not commit in her quest to become more dangerous. This in turn caused her to look past her various coping mechanisms and give an honest look at the various things she'd been doing over the last couple years; the lows she'd sunk to. Stuff she'd glossed over or ignored as she Hedgehog's Dilemma'd her way through life. Stuff that, when she really looked at it, she didn't much like. And this terribly broken attack dog of a person then set about trying to make of herself a better person. Mind, we were still in the middle of a military intel campaign and committed to a number of battles as we solved the mystery, so abandoning violence wasn't in the cards even if Kat was capable of doing so, but channeling that violence, and making it a means to an end, rather than violence for its own sake, absolutely was. She threw herself headlong into thwarting the bad guys, especially the evil alien cult who practiced that spectacular new way of killing people with one's brain, to the point where, when we finally threw down with them for the last time at the campaign's climax; they had granted her a title and made her target number one.

You would not believe how pleased I was at that. That first moment, when the cultist mob charged into the room, pointed all their guns at Kat, and screamed "Death to the Infidel!" was one of the proudest moments in my gaming career. Topped shortly thereafter when we engaged the cult's leader, and he ordered his men to go after the others; he would deal with Kat personally. At that moment, as far as I was concerned, Kat had won. Even if she died that next moment, she'd won. She'd gotten called out specifically by the campaign's final Boss. The fact that she managed to hold said Boss in place in single combat; matching psionically-generated lightsaber against psionically-generated lightsaber for multiple combat rounds, until the rest of the party had dealt with the other targets and backshot the shit out of said Boss... Neutralizing an end Boss with one character is one hell of a thing.

Then, in the Behind The Veil campaign, as the merged parties went about the business of that little mystery, Kat's arc continued. With a lot less combat, and a lot more time to work at it, Kat continued to make of herself a better person; helped by the other characters and the way we all bounced off each other (SirJalinth and Taurus II's characters in particular - of note, Taurus II was part of the other group in the Gap campaign. Like Kat, he figured out how the cult's little party trick worked. Unlike Kat, he then decided he still wanted to learn how to do it himself, with some nebulous plan to use it only for good. This lead to... friction between the two characters. Friction that was not helped by the fact that Jack LeJune was a Telepath as well as a
Spoiler: Show
and Kat, for backstory reasons, hated Telepaths at least as much as she hated
Spoiler: Show
s... There were a couple moments when I had to sit back and ponder if what LeJune had just done constituted a Fragging Offense or not. Probably for the best that Kat backed off of doing so each time.)

Kat didn't quite manage to hold down that campaign's Boss alone, but she certainly distracted it until the rest of the gang could join the dogpile; which still made for a solid ending. Especially given some of the aftermath fun.

EDIT: courtesy of a Christmas present getting me a commissioned pic of her...

 
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SeekerJST

Silent Spirits
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I'd like to point out that a lot of this was supported mechanically, by Kat taking a wound tag in that attack DG mentioned and then owning the hell out of it.

Edit: Also, I think DG, you're sticks in my mind more because Kat did it with a certain... panache, shall we say?
 
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Anshu

New member
Banned
Jack's arc wasn't as clear-cut or dramatic, mostly because I don't feel the campaigns involved the right situations to really show it off to the same extent as Kat's.

Jack started out as a psionically-talented slacker, depressed with how he'd failed himself in life, who joined the Fleet partly out of a sense of obligation, partly out of a hope that he'd be able to find a sense of purpose. It worked, as he found himself thrust into a situation confronting a strange alien device, which could (if understood) be of tremendous help to the Terran Sphere in the ongoing war.

So he stuck his brain in it and tried to figure out how it worked. And that was how Jack learned [the spoiler]. Jack resisted the urge to actually use this knowledge for some time, but eventually decided it might be useful (that is, it took me a while to decide if I really wanted to buy any points in the secret skill that had opened up).

Now, DG's comment about Jack having a nebulous plan to use it only for good was more or less true, with the caveat that Jack essentially views himself as expendable; "Jack does something bad to achieve an important objective, is later punished for it" is a good outcome in his mind. Given that outlook, Jack went about using this power to threaten a prisoner into giving up important information, and kill an enemy commander in the climactic battle sequence. In the Behind the Veil campaign, he even got to use it in some ways that were not ethically questionable, which was nice. However, he did again stick his brain into alien technology, except this time it only made him high instead of revealing a new skill.

I was actually thinking about Jack again recently, and decided that if he comes back to play, his Trouble Tag will be either [I Stuck My Brain In It Again], or [You Can Prosecute Me After We Win].
 

Mostlyjoe

is plotting your doom.
Validated User
Mechanically the system has my attention. But I dunno, that cover doesn't scream MASS EFFECT or anything very modern spacy to me. Especially the font and 'filiagre'? Makes me feel like I'm looking at SPACE:18XX variant. Thankfully book/cover is not how I shall judge it. But, I dunno. Stylistic choices throw me off.
 
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SeekerJST

Silent Spirits
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Mechanically the system has my attention. But I dunno, that cover doesn't scream MASS EFFECT or anything very modern spacy to me. Especially the font and 'filiagre'? Makes me feel like I'm looking at SPACE:18XX variant. Thankfully book/cover is not how I shall judge it. But, I dunno. Stylistic choices throw me off.
One of the things to keep in mind is that prior to the war Humanity was enjoying an unambiguous Golden Age. Maybe not the utopian heights of, say, Star Trek, but it's a society in which the majority of humanity collectively lives longer and has it's material and mental needs better met than at any time in the past. The war is supposed to be in deliberate contrast to that. Pulling in Art Deco elements in the artwork helps us reflect that, while still keeping a more modern feel. Meanwhile, the Triptych layout gives us a central idea and two viewpoints that play off that idea. (whether their complementary, like the corebook cover, or opposed as with the Companion).

In other news, Redemption is the Deal of the Day over at DriveThruRPG at 50% off, so if you've been interested in checking it out, now would be a good time! :D
 
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