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Sell/Unsell me on Dungeon Crawl Classics...

Grimmzorch

Registered User
Validated User
As the title says I am interested in Dungeon Crawl Classics and also Mutant Crawl Classics and wanted to know what everyone thought of them. I am also interested if there are big differences between the various editions/printings of the DCC book and if the older modules are fully compatible with the newest edition of the rules.
 

D13

Luckily Unlucky
Validated User
I enjoy those games very well. They are completely compatible. The different printings simply fix typos and offer expanded explanation for intended mechanics but overall they're all the same game.

DCC and MCC are two games my groups go to when we have absences away from our normal weekly scheduled campaigns. Every group I've been in has run DCC and MCC a little more silly than serious. Pun name, joke deaths, and so on. Sort of in the spirit of Paranoia.

My friends and I compare the various styles of D&D to rock music. If D&D is radio rock, a game like Shadow of the Demon Lord is Death Metal. Lamentations of the Flame Princess is Screamo Black Metal. DCC would be comparable to Prog-rock.

DCC compared this way pushes the ideas of what D&D does in a creative way, not extreme, just creative. It's a well thought out game system with an accepting community. And they have a neat public play reward system just for getting word of the game out there. The adventures are well written and firmly evoke that "old school" adventure vibe without being preachy about it.

I always suggest to check out the Spellburn podcast which is all about DCC. Glowburn is an okay listen dedicated to the MCC game.

The rules set is very what you see is what you get, but there is an inordinate amount of fan created content out there. Also with the different game lines being compatible if you want to introduce a mutation or high tech element into a standard DCC game, they blend with little resistance. I had a DCC character that gained a mutation which made one of his arms super strong.
 

smarttman

I do some stuff
Validated User
DCC is probably most 'in tune' with what I imagine the early hobby was like - mixed humor and serious adventuring, has crazy deaths and crazier monsters, blends sci-fi and fantasy into something greater than the sum of its parts. The only sticking point for players is probably spells are gonna be a bit different than normal D&D-style RPGs, but it's not that hard to wrap your head around - just print out the page for your spells and make a literal spellbook lol
 

JohnBiles

Registered User
Validated User
The magic system of DCC struck me as 'You want to be a magic user? We're going to make your life suck, while not actually giving you anything to balance the suck'. Being a mage is basically a form of long-term suicide. A lot of the advice on how to hit the tone they want, IMO, contradicted the actual content of the stories which they think they're grounding their system in. Wandering all over creation is the *essence* of Conan, Elric, etc.


It does, however, have some interesting ideas to develop non-casting classes. In that regard, I thought they did a good job.

Goodman Games' adventures can range on the full spectrum from 'really great' (like Castle Whiterock, which I loved) to fairly mediocre. A lot of the stuff they tried to do for 4E had cool ideas, but they clearly had no idea how to actually handle 4E's mechanics. But with their older adventures and their new stuff, that's not a problem.

(While it's off-topic, I like their line of Call of Cthulhu Adventures, which hit a nice sweet spot between 'too short' and 'only playable if you can run a long campaign' and which were both mechanically and conceptually solid, the Age of Cthulhu line, which I have all of... well, I should check. I have the first nine, anyway, and they're all good.)
 

ajevans

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Validated User
I look at the art I'm sold. I page through the book and a combination of the evocative imagery and nostalgia produce a mild euphoric high. And then there's the funnel adventures, which are such a marvelous idea, play a slew of random characters, free free to take risks - if they survive they'll have a great story to tell. But then you level up and it all starts becoming a bit hum-drum, the random tables for everything for random's sake gets a bit wearisome (for example if you level up and get a new spell, but end up with a fairly useless spell with onerous casting requirements), and sub-systems like the spell-dual mechanics feel tacked on and overwrought. It's still a good game but the sheen wears off fairly.
 

Grimble

Registered User
Validated User
Great adventures.
Have a look at Sailors on the Starless Sea or Bride of the Black Manse. If that floats your boat, then DCC is for you. But not because of the system, you could probably run them in any D&D type game with a little work. But honestly, the attention and craft they put into their one shots is unparalleled.
 

Galadrin

Registered User
Validated User
I wanted to like DCC but I found the game system to be a total player power-trip shortly after 0-level. Some of the adventures are pretty good though and worth stealing ideas from.
 

D13

Luckily Unlucky
Validated User
DCC does have a sharp power curve because there are only ten levels as opposed to D&D's 20(+) levels. But they tend to be directly scalable and compatible with other D&D adventures a little adjustment. A DCC level is roughly half of a D&D level so a level 12 D&D adventure is convertable into level 6 DCC adventure, and so on.
 

the cat

Drone
Validated User
G Galadrin my players felt the complete opposite about player power. There have been plenty of player death though our group is level 1. They wont be leveling any time soon either...

Personally I really enjoy DCC and it being all you need to get started is very easy on the waller compared to other games.

Also dont forget the quick start rules found on the kickstarter page.
 

D13

Luckily Unlucky
Validated User
In my region softcover core rules on Amazon is like $25 USD.

My groups like to do leveling at the end of every session, especially since we use DCC as our off game night. So there might be many weeks between sessions if everyone is in attendance.
 
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