• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

[Sentinels of the Multiverse] I'm diggin' it

Calliope

Super Moderator
Moderator
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I normally don't go in for pure card games. There have been exceptions, like Illuminati and Hacker Deluxe. I used to be a big CCG player, with a huge Magic collection, a ton of Rage and Star Wars, plus a scattering of other, more obscure games that died out when the CCG bubble collapsed. Still, I find that I'm generally more drawn to board games for some reason.

That said, I'm really liking Sentinels of the Multiverse.

I realize it's been out for a while, so it's probably old news to most of the people here, but for those who aren't familiar with it: it's a co-op card game in which the players take the roles of various superheroes who are clearly inspired by various Marvel and DC characters. Those heroes each have their own dedicated deck, and they work together to try to take out one of several villains (again, with each villain having their own deck). These range from a Lex Luthor type to an Ultron/Braniac super-robot to eldritch horrors to a Magneto-esque leader of rogue superhumans.

The rules are incredibly simple: every player picks a hero. You collectively pick a villain and an environment. Each turn follows a very simple turn order which mostly consists of playing a single card and activating a single power (with some variation created by the effects of various cards).

Within that framework, though, it's impressive how much variation and theme they've managed to introduce.

Take Tachyon. Tachyon is the token speedster. She has relatively few cards in her deck that actually deal damage. She does have two things of note in her deck, though: cards that have "burst" as a keyword and lots of cards that let her draw/play/discard extra cards. She also has one card that, when played, does X damage, where X=the number of "burst" cards she has in her trash pile.

So as far as I can tell, her strategy mainly revolves around blowing through her deck as quickly as possible, drawing and playing a ton of cards to build up her trash pile in order to build up to a big attack. Once you run out of cards, you shuffle the trash pile and start again. This...all seems to make perfect sense for a speedster character, somehow.

The villains are likewise cleverly done - Omnitron, the evil robot mentioned earlier, has a seemingly never-ending supply of drones and devices that it keeps reconstructing as fast as you can destroy them.


Lastly, I want to mention one feature of the game (or at least, the enhanced re-release) that I think gets overlooked in far too many games: storage.

I understand the original game was pretty bad in terms of not being able to get all of the cards back into the box, keeping everything organized, etc. So when Greater/Than/Games re-released the core set, they did so in a box box with plenty of room not just for the starter cards, but for the expansions. Better yet, they included dividers for each of the heroes, villains, and environments in the core set and the first two expansions.

The result is one of the most nicely-organized boxes of any of the games I own. Here's my box currently, with the core set, the first two main expansions (Rook City and Infernal Relics), and a few of the one character mini-expansions:





I wish more game companies would pay attention to that kind of stuff.
 
Last edited:

Mejiro

I think I'm a Drow now
Validated User
You have organised the decks in alphabetical order, as do all right-thinking folk. When you leave this vale of tears, then you shall be judged worthy of the Kingdom of Heaven.

More usefully, it is quite a fun game. Most of the time there's always something a given hero can do, and while there are 'good' and 'bad' matchups, there aren't any flat-out 'bad' heroes (although a few of the core ones tend to feel a little rougher than the later ones - Absolute Zero in particular seems to need a lot more setup, and had a base power that's worse than useless on its own). Some of the combos you can get are fun as well - when you get Fanatic to cause the apocalypse, blow up all the enemy stuff and then blow up one of Unity's Beebots to destroy the apocalypse and prevent damage to the heroes stuff, it's a good feeling (or blow up Akash-Bhuta's limbs and do, like, 80+ damage). If you get the second big box, that box is laid out with about a third of it as a single compartment, so it even has somewhere to put the counters as well.
 

Gaffa

Fallen Writer
Validated User
They are beautiful boxes, aren't they!?

Tachyon is a great choice for how hero theme drives mechanics in the game. (She's also an indirect show of how little some reviewers, especially of the computer version, must have played the game, as there's a few now infamous reviews of the tablet port that mention how useless Tachyon is because her attacks don't do anything).

But even better than that is how, if they can manage it, they try to make the Hero and their Nemesis decks work with and around each other other. For those who haven't played, each hero has one (or more!) archenemies, identified by a little heraldic symbol on the hero and villain. Archenemies do +1 damage to each other, which is significant enough, but Greater Than Games tries very hard to get their decks to fit each other as well. Tachyon, as mentioned, plays a tons of cards each turn that build up to a killer couple of final blows. Her nemesis, the Matriarch (her overly dramatic younger relative), plays a tons of cards each turn -- her endless flocks of birds. Each bird does just 1 little damage to a poor hero, but they keep coming back. And when you kill a bird, the Matriarch freaks out and counterattacks you. Ignore the birds, and they pick you apart. Ignore the Matriarch, and she slaughters you. Unless you're like Tachyon, who happens to have a number of cards that not only do 1 damage to an entire crowd of targets, they also nullify all counterattacks.
 

Katsue

Young Witch
Validated User
My favourite Hero-Villain nemesis pairing is Fanatic vs. Apostate. Apostate very much comes off as Fanatic's dark mirror, to the extent that he even has a card with the exact same wording as one of Fanatic's cards.

Chrono Ranger vs. Plague Rat is probably my second favourite. KNYFE vs. Progeny gets honourable mention.
 

Victim

Registered User
Validated User
Eh, I don't think Tachyon is really especially good against Matriarch. It's not like her deck is half hypersonic assault, and Matriarch can play enough stuff to make you want it every turn. Legacy is much more of counter pick. Or heroes like Visionary or Haka can prevent her graveyard recovery. Wraith spamming stunbolts can cripple Matriarch's counter attacks normally and use throat jab to negate them on big turns.

And while Tachyon is far from useless, I don't think there are too many matchups where I'd consider her normal card to be a top pick. She doesn't synergize especially well with damage boosters because her normal turn does little damage, struggles against damage reducing enemies (a lot of advanced mode villains have a side with global DR) especially because hypersonic assault requires doing damage, and is vulnerable to discard and graveyard affecting environments. And while one might think her relative independence from ongoings and equipment makes her a strong option against villains who blow up stuff, the enemies who specialize in that kind of thing tend to have other factors that screw her too.
 

Mejiro

I think I'm a Drow now
Validated User
Against both of the top level villains (Matriarch and Chairman) Haka makes life so much easier - both are mook heavy, so if you can get Haka to eat all the mooks and lock them out of the draw pile, life gets a lot simpler. His DR card makes him pretty durable against low damage ping as well. The heroes from the starting box tend to be a bit more 'generalist' than later ones, with less odd little mechanics (except for choosable DR types, which have mercifully disappeared, as they're a bugger to remember). Wraith, in particular, can do pretty much everything (single damage, group damage, a little bit of healing, deck modification), and Legacy is still the go-to guy for team buffing for damage and soak. You can always make life easier or harder for yourself by picking a team to use, or going random and seeing how bad the draw can get (Unity against someone that routinely does 'damage all Hero targets' is not going to be working at full effectiveness, while Omni-X against targets that only do 1 damage type can be basically invulnrable)
 

Tardigrade

oso de agua
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Lastly, I want to mention one feature of the game (or at least, the enhanced re-release) that I think gets overlooked in far too many games: storage.

I understand the original game was pretty bad in terms of not being able to get all of the cards back into the box, keeping everything organized, etc. So when Greater/Than/Games re-released the core set, they did so in a box box with plenty of room not just for the starter cards, but for the expansions. Better yet, they included dividers for each of the heroes, villains, and environments in the core set and the first two expansions.

The result is one of the most nicely-organized boxes of any of the games I own. Here's my box currently, with the core set, the first two main expansions (Rook City and Infernal Relics), and a few of the one character mini-expansions:
Just to comment on this one facet of your post: the Vengeance expansion, which introduces the option of fighting a whole team of villains at once, comes in another large box. It has the same two columns that the base game box has, but reserves a small part for other things. It's possible to fit every existing (official) hero and environment in the base game box, and all villains and other bits in the Vengeance box.
 

PlatinumWarlock

Lord of Shiny-Things Keep
Validated User
I do love me some Sentinels...it hands-down gets the most play around our game table and rare is the game night that doesn't end with 2-3 of us slinging some SotM.

I am a bit sad that the game is hitting the end of its development cycle. The devs have said that there's a finite end coming, likely with the expansion after "Villains of the Multiverse", but in some ways, that's a good thing. I'd hate for the game to get into Arkham Horror territory, where there's just so much stuff that it becomes a bear to store.

But that said? So much fun! So much replay value! SotM is easily among my top 3 games all-time.
 

Tardigrade

oso de agua
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I do love me some Sentinels...it hands-down gets the most play around our game table and rare is the game night that doesn't end with 2-3 of us slinging some SotM.

I am a bit sad that the game is hitting the end of its development cycle. The devs have said that there's a finite end coming, likely with the expansion after "Villains of the Multiverse", but in some ways, that's a good thing. I'd hate for the game to get into Arkham Horror territory, where there's just so much stuff that it becomes a bear to store.

But that said? So much fun! So much replay value! SotM is easily among my top 3 games all-time.
If you ever tire of all existing official sets, check out The Cauldron, a fantastically produced fan set with 14 heroes, 8 villains and 7 environments. You can find more fansets at BGG; the Berkeley environment is a particularly tricky one.
 

PlatinumWarlock

Lord of Shiny-Things Keep
Validated User
If you ever tire of all existing official sets, check out The Cauldron, a fantastically produced fan set with 14 heroes, 8 villains and 7 environments. You can find more fansets at BGG; the Berkeley environment is a particularly tricky one.
I've actually helped write a few variants--not any of The Cauldron, mind you.

I helped write the "Kingdom of Wisdom" environment (based on Norton Juster's "The Phantom Tollbooth") as well as a supplement that I called "SotM Heroic Arsenal", which was basically 1-2 Equipment Cards that you could drop into existing heroes' decks, giving them new Equipment-based options.
 
Top Bottom