• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

[Shadespire] Casual/Newbie friendly discussion thread

Chikahiro

Neo•Geo Fanboy
Validated User
I GOT THE NAME WRONG! Should be Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire, not Shadowspire.

I don't really know much about the game. So, Shadespire is Games Workshop's entry-level, "more than a board game, less than a tabletop minis" game?

I like board games, but thought the D&D co-op games were too fiddly.

I like miniature games, and play Warmachine/Hordes.

I've got friends who don't play war/mini games, and I'm wondering if its quick and easy enough to introduce them? Also, how is pricing?

ANYTHING COMPARABLE?
 
Last edited:

David Laurence

Hrm.
Validated User
Re: [Sell me on] Shadespire!

I haven't gotten a whole lot of games in, but I can confirm that it is quick to play and easy to pick up (without being simplistic - it's quite deep tactically, both in play and in deck-building prep), and that the price point is (well, relative to miniatures wargaming as a whole) very reasonable - you can just buy a single warband box / split a core box for about 30 bucks and never have to spend another dime on it, as long as your group has a rulebook and game boards to use.

Is there anything in particular you want to know about gameplay etc.?
 

Morsla

I mostly paint things
Validated User
Re: [Sell me on] Shadespire!

I like it. Very quick to play (3 rounds, alternating activations, with each player only getting four activations per round). Mechanics are simple, but there's a fair bit of tactical play available. It's priced pretty fairly for a minis game, and the miniatures in each warband are great - easily some of the best plastic figures available from any manufacturer, and they snap together without even needing glue.

The deck-building limit (only one of any given card) helps to avoid the CCG or X-Wing style push to buy multiples of everything, and the cards that come with each warband box give them plenty of thematic options for play. Orcs get stuck in to combat, Undead slowly swarm across all the objectives, etc. I've picked up all four warbands (starter + two separate ones) so far, but that's mostly because I want to paint All The Things. There are plenty of interesting and powerful options available in the cards bundled with each set of models, and it has plenty of replay value.
 

Chikahiro

Neo•Geo Fanboy
Validated User
Re: [Sell me on] Shadespire!

I don't have anything specific to ask just yet? I'm looking at it and Aristeia for an easy to learn, quick, easy game to get some of my friends at church into.

My normal gaming group plays Warmachine and Hordes, but I'm looking for a game that isn't a rabbit hole of spending, you know? I've got one, I've got a $150 gift certificate to The War Store, and if I can get everything we'd need to play plus some extra? Great! WarmaHordes isn't that, and I don't think Company of Iron is either for that matter.
 

David Laurence

Hrm.
Validated User
Re: [Sell me on] Shadespire!

easily some of the best plastic figures available from any manufacturer
This is truth. They're some of the nicest kits GW currently produces, and that's saying a lot.

That said, a nice thing they're doing is not pushing the "you must take up the painting aspect of The Hobby to play" thing that can be daunting for people new to minis games - all the "how to play" photos in the rulebook and such are very pointedly with unpainted minis.
 

Chikahiro

Neo•Geo Fanboy
Validated User
Re: [Sell me on] Shadespire!

Actually, I do have a question: how do the Objectives work?

Aristeia has game modes, it seems: https://aristeiathegame.com/blog/item/394-the-goal-of-aristeia
Assault: This scenario is based on controlling the Scoring Zones, which change location every round.
Conquest: Here the objective is to have more Scoring Zones than the opponent.
King of the Hill: This one consists of controlling the central Scoring Zone, but sending enemies to the infirmary can also bring you victory.
Scorched Earth: in this Scenario, the Scoring Zone also changes from round to round but can never repeat.
What about Shadespire?
 

FRS

Lurker on the threshold
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Re: [Sell me on] Shadespire!

IMO you should consider Shadespire as a boardgame with some deck building elements, the easy to build miniatures are here to make the game prettier.

It's a fast game, you can finish a 2 players game under 30/45 minutes, the new warband add new playstyle with the card and how the warband is build.

You can also combine 2 starters to play with 3 or 4 players.
 

Morsla

I mostly paint things
Validated User
Re: [Sell me on] Shadespire!

You'll have some cards in your hand each turn - generally starting with 5 power cards (one-shot ploys and more powerful upgrades - from a deck of ~20 cards, half of each type), and 3 Objectives (from a deck of 12). In a two-player game, there are five numbered objective tokens placed face-down on the board at the start, which are flipped over before the first round.

Some Objective cards might say "Control Objective #2 in the end phase to gain 1 Glory point." Those are pretty common, and the starter box comes with two full sets of the Objective 1-5 cards. Controlling simply means that you have a model on top of that hex.

Other Objective cards might be more specific: "Score 1 Glory in an end phase, if no fighter suffered any damage in the preceding action phase" or "score 3 Glory in the third end phase, if five or more enemy fighters are out of action."

Glory points serve two purposes: firstly, they're the way you win the game, by having more of them than your opponent after three rounds.

Secondly, they're used to unlock upgrade cards: unlike Ploys, Upgrades require you to flip a Glory point face-down to equip them. Those points still count towards your total score, but they can only be used to activate a single upgrade card each.

You also get a Glory point for each enemy model you kill. Round 1 play (and building the Objective decks) in most games tends to be about taking a strong board position and grabbing a few early Glory points, so you can power up for the remaining rounds of combat.
 
Last edited:

David Laurence

Hrm.
Validated User
Re: [Sell me on] Shadespire!

It's worth noting, too, that choosing a deck of objective cards that match your (and your warband's) playstyle is really important. You can go full-defense and focus on cards that score you points for holding objectives, or keeping enemy models off of your board section, or you could go full-offense, include no board control objectives, and get a lot of cards that score you glory for ganging up on enemies, or taking out the enemy leader with your leader, or what have you. The various faction-specific objective cards do a really good job of steering that faction towards a certain play style, but you can make a deck purely with factionless cards if you want to.

Basically, you get to choose exactly how you will score victory points when you build your objectives deck - the only "built-in" way to score victory points is by taking enemy models out of action, and you'll generally be (you should be!) getting many more points off your objective cards than just by killing the enemy.
 

DDogwood

Cyborg Space Pirate
Validated User
Re: [Sell me on] Shadespire!

Actually, I do have a question: how do the Objectives work?

Aristeia has game modes, it seems: https://aristeiathegame.com/blog/item/394-the-goal-of-aristeia


What about Shadespire?
The default way to play Shadespire includes 5 objective tokens placed on the board (or more, in 3-4 player matches) and each player's Objectives deck may contain various cards that give Glory points for holding particular objectives. Some players also build decks without any "hold objective" cards, so it's possible to have a match where the objectives don't actually make a difference.

There's also an alternative mode called "Capture the Artifact" where there is an additional objective placed in neutral territory, and it's worth 3 Glory points to whomever is holding it at the end of each round (and the fighter holding it gets Inspired, too). I haven't played this mode yet, but it sounds like it wouldn't necessarily be drastically different from the normal game.

AFAIK there aren't any other game modes yet, but the variety in options for deck-building makes a standard game pretty varied as it is. The same warband will play very differently depending on how each player builds the deck.
 
Top Bottom