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Should a setting reproduce core rules?

kattkin

Retired User
I was thinking about criticism I received for a starfinder campaign setting I'm writing. Essentially, I had planned to only detail changes to the core rules and otherwise trust that the players would already have access to Starfinder (I'm planning to publish under their license).

Someone suggested that this would limit appeal because people wouldn't necessarily have the core book or be immediately familiar with the rules. I don't know if it's even legal to reproduce, say, the abilities, skills, and feats sections of the core book; even under license; so I don't know what I could do about that?

Basically I'm wondering if it's acceptable to most people shopping starfinder campaign settings to say, "Use starfinder rules, here are the special differences for this setting." I seem to recall that's more or less what the dragonlance & ravenloft d20 settings did but maybe I'm mistaken and they had skill summary sections? I'm trying to take criticism seriously but I genuinely don't think it's a good idea to add 50 pages of duplicate information. Just looking for other opinions.
 

Michael K

Social Justice Dragon
Validated User
I would prefer as little reproduction as possible, especially if the original product (or access to an SRD) is required to play anyway. I know that there are a few creators that add almost the whole SRD (EDIT: of a given system) to their "products" to blow up pagecount but it leaves a very bad taste in my mouth.
 

Chikahiro

Neo•Geo Fanboy
Validated User
I don't think so just because you've only got so much time and space. It'd be better to reference stuff - "see page xyz of the Core Rulebook."

What's allowed or not is determined by the license holder. I mean, if they say "no products may use sans-serifed font otherwise you're out of compliance," well, there you go. You really ought check with them if possible, rereading the license a time or two, asking for clarifications.
 

kattkin

Retired User
Yeah, you've both got me nodding along. I think references and maybe a web address for an SRD would be best.
 

Chikahiro

Neo•Geo Fanboy
Validated User
It'll certainly save you space, layout work, etc. I mean, heck, you could quite literally have a short URL or QR code for the SRD on every page (using a master page layout or such) just to get them to it (I assume the SRD is mobile friendly?).

Best of luck! :3
 

LuciusAlexander

PalindromedaryRider
Validated User
I would prefer as little reproduction as possible, especially if the original product (or access to an SRD) is required to play anyway. I know that there are a few creators that add almost the whole SRD (EDIT: of a given system) to their "products" to blow up pagecount but it leaves a very bad taste in my mouth.
While I understand and sympathize with the aversion to a product including duplicated rules, rather than ascribe a motive to "blow up pagecount" I suggest that perhaps the motivation is to avoid someone buying the product and saying "Hey, this isn't even complete, the rules I need aren't here!"

Lucius Alexander

Hey this tagline isn't complete, where's the palindromedary?
 

Armin

Martian Spamhunter
Staff member
Moderator
RPGnet Member
Validated User
While I understand and sympathize with the aversion to a product including duplicated rules, rather than ascribe a motive to "blow up pagecount" I suggest that perhaps the motivation is to avoid someone buying the product and saying "Hey, this isn't even complete, the rules I need aren't here!"
If the rules they need are core rules for the system, then the problem is on them. Only things that are *new* or *different* should be in there.
 

Michael K

Social Justice Dragon
Validated User
While I understand and sympathize with the aversion to a product including duplicated rules, rather than ascribe a motive to "blow up pagecount" I suggest that perhaps the motivation is to avoid someone buying the product and saying "Hey, this isn't even complete, the rules I need aren't here!"

Lucius Alexander

Hey this tagline isn't complete, where's the palindromedary?
If the rules (FATE in the example I'm thinking of) are freely available and only end up as a cheap copy-and-paste job that runs to upwards of 50% of the "product", I'm disinclined to be charitable in my interpretation of the "creator's" motives.
 

LuciusAlexander

PalindromedaryRider
Validated User
What's allowed or not is determined by the license holder. I mean, if they say "no products may use sansserifed font otherwise you're out of compliance," well, there you go. You really ought check with them if possible, rereading the license a time or two, asking for clarifications.
This is the smartest thing said so far. If you have no choice, as they say in politics, you have no problem.

If you do have a choice, you have problem summed up as: Either way you go, someone will tell you that you're wrong.

But if you do go the route of leaving out the core rules, be sure to say prominently on the cover "Requires core rules of XYZ to play."


Lucius Alexander

Oh, here's the palindromedary!
 

Myth

Southern Mane
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I'm pretty used to seeing the "Requires the ZXY Players' Guide to play"-type tagline on my rules-variant or setting books.
 
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