Speak to me of Deckbuilding Games

Reynard

Registered User
Validated User
#51
Did you do the tutorial run? Because that shit's not a good example of play. Just keep out the rules reference and do Dungeon Delve 1. If you forget to do something, write it down and move on. The game is tough, and there is a lot to take in. But the tutorial? Bah!
We did not. I jumped right in to the Dungeon Delve. Part of the problem was The Girl was irritated with her Brother and did not back up The Boy when he was getting mobbed by tokens AND the shambling mound I pulled for the first monster...
 

JasonKW

Registered User
Validated User
#52
We did not. I jumped right in to the Dungeon Delve. Part of the problem was The Girl was irritated with her Brother and did not back up The Boy when he was getting mobbed by tokens AND the shambling mound I pulled for the first monster...
Its all-in coop, that's for sure!
 

VicenteC

Member
RPGnet Member
Validated User
#53
I have tried to like Dragonfire, but I just can't like it: it's too hard, and progression (during the game and between games in the campaign) is glacial... I love the ideas of the game, I just wish there was a way to fix those two issues.
 

enoto

E, not O.
Validated User
#54
Shadowrun Crossfire 1st ed. (on which Dragonfire is based) is similarly a heartbreaker. I picked up S:C 2nd ed, which in theory smoothed out the diffixulty a little, but it hasn’t made it to the table yet.
 

Asklepios

Registered User
Validated User
#55
Of the ones I've played recently:

Dominion has been much mentioned but should be mentioned again. It's hard to be aware just how finely tuned and clever this game is until you've been playing it for a year. There's a whole community of really engaged players who've gone deep into simulation software to work out odds around different strategies. In term of deckbuilding games this is the purest.

I concur that Shadowrun Crossfire is not good. The difficulty comes from the random number generators being stacked against you rather than the complexity of the puzzle, and it's an exercise in frustration.

The DC Comics Deckbuilding Game is fun and light, but is very dependent on luck of the draw, because of the rolling market of cards to buy from rather than having a selection of options. Its also overly linear, with a player who does well early on tending to continue to dominate as the game goes on. One of Dominion's cleverest moves is to have victory point cards be bad for a deck, so there's a big tempo decision in when you make your deck bad in order to meet the win condition. The DC games lack that, instead having the best scoring cards also be the best cards, which makes for a real feeling of one player getting all the fun in a lot of games.

My current favourite however is Tyrants of the Underdark. There is a rolling market of cards and a lot of variation in card quality, but enough repetition of themes within a given set to give you a rough idea of what to expect and how to plan. Broadly, the set up is that you combine two sets to make that game's market deck, and that in turn makes for your unique game experience. The randomisation there makes it less pure than Dominion, and you can get a lot of advantage being the player after a player who buys recklessly. However, in some other ways it is a BETTER game than Dominion.
Firstly, it seamlessly merges an area control board game with the deckbuilding, and the game resources used to expand and conquer are separate to the game resources used to build economy.
Secondly, it is designed for and works well for multiple players, whereas Dominion is best as a duelling game. The games of politics and dealbreaking make this game very enjoyable and competitive.
Thirdly, the VP win conditions are all openly visible, but complex enough that you can't easily make a judgement call as to who is winning, though with skill and experience this becomes easier.
All in all, Tyrants is actually my #1 deckbuilding game right now for testing skill and feeling like decisions are consequential. Though I love Dominion as a second best, that game is so well-explored and simulated that the "best" approach is often known to an expert player. In Tyrants, the mix of board control, diplomacy, dual resources and overlapping scoring conditions make it a much harder game to "solve", and the high level of control given in consequential but non-obvious decisions makes it a real pleasure and challenge to play.
 

joenr76

Escalation die!
Validated User
#56
Late to the party, but I haven't seen a recommendation for Lewis and Clarke. It's not a pure deck builder, but it uses a lot of the same elements. Your party (aka 'Corps of Discovery') is made up of characters you can acquire (and remove). But you also need to power the characters to take their action by playing cards face down. It's combined with board that is both a race and a worker placement game. Fun (if you can stand the game using the word 'Indians' everywhere, that is)

I also like Clank! I have the Sunken treasures expansion, but haven't played it yet. I don't have Clank in Space.

I'm also one the people that like Dominion, even if the original base game was quite limited in what the cards did. It got better by the time of Intrigue (and very bad with the Alchemy expansion)

Star realms has been mentioned in this thread a couple of times. I liked it at first, but I found it boring quite quickly. I prefer the other variant: Cthulhu realms. I like the theme better and it's made to be played as a multi-player.

I also bought Blood Bowl Team Manager because it was marketed as a deck builder. It has only some very very very light deck building, however. Not a completely bad game, but not one I want to play again and again.
 

vitus979

Registered User
RPGnet Member
Validated User
#57
I'm also one the people that like Dominion, even if the original base game was quite limited in what the cards did. It got better by the time of Intrigue (and very bad with the Alchemy expansion)
Yes, but the Prosperity and Seaside expansions are great, and I've heard some of the later ones are good. I haven't played anything after Prosperity yet, but I hope to sometime. I've heard particularly good things about Adventures, Empires, and the newest Renaissance.
 

joenr76

Escalation die!
Validated User
#58
Yes, but the Prosperity and Seaside expansions are great, and I've heard some of the later ones are good. I haven't played anything after Prosperity yet, but I hope to sometime. I've heard particularly good things about Adventures, Empires, and the newest Renaissance.
Apparently, I had the timeline wrong in my head, seaside and prosperity came after Intrigue. You're right: Seaside and Prosperity are great. I also haven't played newer expansions.
 

Asklepios

Registered User
Validated User
#59
Alchemy wasn't all that bad. Potions upped the randomness and draw-luck elements, for sure, but as long as you were aware of that and making calculated gambles it was still all within the spirit of Dominion.
 

joenr76

Escalation die!
Validated User
#60
Alchemy wasn't all that bad. Potions upped the randomness and draw-luck elements, for sure, but as long as you were aware of that and making calculated gambles it was still all within the spirit of Dominion.
* For me that randomness was too high.
* it's not really an expansion, as you should play an 'Alchemy dominion game' by adding 3-5 cards from Alchemy.
* Adding potions to non-alchemy set-ups (yes, people do this), screws with all of Dominion.
* Possession: Don't like the effect, seating order shouldn't matter this much in Dominion and the FAQ around it is 10 times as long as the card.
 
Top Bottom