(Spinoff) What is cyberpunk and what is a cyberpunk RPG?

WistfulD

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Well, if you set your series on a starship you probably don't intend to show its crew just hanging out at home half the time. I mean, I don't complain about Westerns not including enough Austro-Hungarian court intrigue either even though both take place at the same time on the same single planet. :)

Which, by all accounts was Dave999's point. He referred to something as "Like Star Trek on Earth," as an analogy for a setup unfriendly for adventure plots. You appear to be agreeing with that analysis, yet still for some reason seem to be implying that he stated something erroneous or untoward, and the rest of us are unclear why.
 

LatinaBunny

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I’m not familiar with the setting, but is the Star Trek Earth really that (unrealistically) utopian?

I mean, I still think we can still have other adventures or domestic problems on all types of “Earths”, because realistically, bad people can potentially be anywhere in the universe. Someone out there will take advantage or get involved with corruption, etc. It’s human nature.

But that doesn’t mean it has to be a full-blown dystopian setting 100%. If having bad guys or just having human-like problems is considered dystopian, then we might as well label every movie, tv show, book, and video game as dystopian. That means everything I’ve been watching, reading, and playing is considered a dystopia... which I highly doubt.

We humans are flawed and we make mistakes, of course, and and we all have free will and various personalities and groups with different interests and viewpoints, etc. We all got our problems, whether internally and/or externally, our flaws, our sins, and so on.

So there should always potential for all types of adventures or conflicts anywhere wherever we humans are found, lol.

I’m sure even in a so-called “utopia”, there would still be threats to be fought, various problems to solve, corruption somewhere to deal with, etc. Because, you know, humans aren’t perfect beings.

(Edited for minor spelling mistakes only.)
 
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Dagor

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Which, by all accounts was Dave999's point. He referred to something as "Like Star Trek on Earth," as an analogy for a setup unfriendly for adventure plots. You appear to be agreeing with that analysis, yet still for some reason seem to be implying that he stated something erroneous or untoward, and the rest of us are unclear why.
Frankly, there are at least two possible interpretations of "like Star Trek on Earth", both of which would have their issues.

1.) "Like the show, only scaled down so that everything that would otherwise happen in the whole galaxy now takes place on Earth" -- which would hardly count as an "adventure-unfriendly" approach given the shenanigans happening in pretty much every episode and movie.

2.) "Like setting a campaign on Federation Earth as seen in Star Trek" -- well, okay, so what do we actually know about that Earth? Chances are it's nowhere near a picture-perfect utopia itself because perfection is basically unattainable and even the somewhat more enlightened human civilization postulated in the franchise will still consist of humans as we know and love or hate them, it's just that since the focus of the shows is elsewhere we don't see much of whatever problems people who spend their whole lives on the planet may actually have to deal with. (Which incidentally isn't much different from the depictions of every other planet in the series -- all we know about what life may be like on those is what we see when the protagonists are there, and they're usually by definition outsiders looking in and not planning to stay long.) So even this one is really only as "adventure-unfriendly" as the GM actively wants to make it.
 

LordofArcana

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2. The punk is why there's actual adventures to have. Because if the tech isn't being abused and society isn't dysfunctional then it's not a very adventure-friendly place.
There's nothing stopping a utopian version of cyberpunk setting from having man vs nature or man vs man conflicts. Given how many adventures in fiction are man vs nature, I don't see why you couldn't update them for a more advanced tech level. And people are always going to get into arguments over what is best and the justice system can only resolve some of them.
 

LatinaBunny

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There's nothing stopping a utopian version of cyberpunk setting from having man vs nature or man vs man conflicts. Given how many adventures in fiction are man vs nature, I don't see why you couldn't update them for a more advanced tech level. And people are always going to get into arguments over what is best and the justice system can only resolve some of them.
^Yes, exactly! :D People will be people. There is no such things as perfection.

And not everyone’s body will adjust to all of the tech, and some people may have different views on the tech or government, etc. (For example, I myself am not a big transhumanism fan outside of perhaps some sentient AI. I’m also allergic to a type of metal, as another example, etc.)

We could have: natural disasters, limited resources (that can’t be remade unless we go to other planets), maybe new disease strains or mutations, disagreements within the medical field and the public on some medical procedures (like anti-vaxxers or something), people not wanting all of the tech for various reasons, disagreements on how to manage and govern a society of diverse populations and beliefs and trying to decide what laws are fair or unfair or what’s taboo or not, sudden manifestations of magical abilities/mutant powers, a zombie-like infestation, robot AI gaining sentience all of a sudden and some robots may disagree with humanity, and so on.

Not all stories revolve around an entire society of corruption, or is fully into the dystopian genre. Like, there can be some dystopian, horror, and/or post-apocalyptic elements, but I’m pretty sure not all scifi or futuristic fiction would fit into the dystopian or cyberpunk genre box perfectly 100%.

At least, I’m pretty sure not all stories are dystopian (or whatever-punk) genre.

Just because there could be some elements of corruption in areas doesn’t make a society a total dystopia or the story focused on the dystopian life.

I don’t think high-tech should always equal low-life dystopian-ness. There is no perfect utopia, and there will always be human nature (with all of the diversity), limited resources, and all sorts of disasters to deal with. Just like real life.
 
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LatinaBunny

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The whole utopian argument reminds me of when some people tell others like me that fantasy MUST be medieval (or must always be like D&D), and MUST be old fashioned and racist and sexist, or else we are asking for a utopia.

I would assume the creative large umbrella of the SF/F genre can allow a variety of worlds and adventures to exist, no?
 

Dave999

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The whole utopian argument reminds me of when some people tell others like me that fantasy MUST be medieval (or must always be like D&D), and MUST be old fashioned and racist and sexist, or else we are asking for a utopia.

I would assume the creative large umbrella of the SF/F genre can allow a variety of worlds and adventures to exist, no?
Part of the issue is that there's no point in adding "punk" to something unless someone is getting screwed over.
 

LordofArcana

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Part of the issue is that there's no point in adding "punk" to something unless someone is getting screwed over.
I think it goes deeper than that. I can't think of a single game set in the modern-ish world where the characters could be considered to be going on adventures where the world isn't a mess of sinister conspiracies.

Anything set 20th century on seems to do this. Maybe Pulp is an exception, I haven't read much of it.
 

Dave999

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I think it goes deeper than that. I can't think of a single game set in the modern-ish world where the characters could be considered to be going on adventures where the world isn't a mess of sinister conspiracies.

Anything set 20th century on seems to do this. Maybe Pulp is an exception, I haven't read much of it.
A hero is only as good as his villain.

But there is one: Transhuman Space.
 

LatinaBunny

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Part of the issue is that there's no point in adding "punk" to something unless someone is getting screwed over.
Ah, okay, sorry. I misunderstood. :) So, for people like me who dislike dystopian cyber-worlds, we would call the non-dystopian futuristic fiction with the labels of post-cyberpunk or plain scifi instead, then?

I’m shallow, and I do think that cyberpunk (and steampunk!) is where lots of the cool aesthetics and high tech is at. I’m so shallow this way. The art is so pretty/cool-lookin’! :D Is a shame I dislike the dystopian/punk themes.
 
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