Spirit of Scion

chiguayante

biggest sword of them all
Knowing now that I'll be using Ex-Altered rules for Exalted, I was looking at the SotC system again and pondering what I could run using it's system as pure as possible. When my players came to me expressing more interest in Scion than Exalted (to my dismay, as I was looking forward to trying out the Exalted Lite rules) I found what seems to be a great opportunity to run a game with the SotC system as little modified as possible.

I will be using the Scion setting right out of the books, but relics, mentors, etc will be aspects and knacks, boons and sundry powers will be stunts. I want to start the players out at a slightly lower pyramid (the +4 pinnacle instead of +5). And I will have the characters progress mechanically as they progress in the story line, something rather at my discretion but a functional and sensible way nonetheless. Character Creation will be in the following phases: 1. Childhood and Mortal Parent, 2. Pantheon and Divine Parent, 3. Becoming An Hero ( ;) ), 4. 15 Minutes of Fame, 5. Sharing the Spotlight. Steps 4 & 5 are similar to the "write your novel" and "cameo another character" stages of SotC char gen.


Anyone else think this is a good idea? Any suggestions (as I've never actually ran SotC, just read the core) on how to implement this idea? Also, if there are any other Scion hacks out there, I'd like to see them to see how they converted Knacks and Boons over to stunts....
 

Scurve

Bwah.
I did a little work on this before giving up, mostly because I couldn't even get through the original Scion system itself. I'm more tempted now to play with something a bit more easily convertable - Truth & Justice, or maybe just plain ol' WUSHU. I would love some tactical SotC goodness, though, so this is bookmarked for sure.

I'll scrounge up my notes tomorrow and see what I can offer.
 

chiguayante

biggest sword of them all
See, I've already played some Scion straight from the book. What really got me was the whiff factor (miss, miss, miss, one-hit KO) and the fact that boons were very very underpowered compared to knacks, and that really threw me off. I want to run this as true to SotC base rules as possible, because I'm really actually finally getting sick of the ST system after 10 years of it being my go-to system. I'll still play nWoD (I'd even play Demon from oWoD if my players wanted to) but the fan-boyism for the system just isn't there anymore after Exalted and Scion.
 

SquidFisher

Unregenerate Deviant
You might want to consider making the various godly attributes (mega-strength, etc.) Skills, as they're a bit easier to scale on the fly for supers-type games. Either that, or nick the Shazam! notation idea from the Window and let them have two/three Skills they can mark with a '!' (i.e, Might! rather than Might) which, when used, always work unless opposed by something else with the Shazam!
 

Rob Donoghue

Registered User
Validated User
I would be tempted to introduce two currencies - mortal and Divine fate points. Maybe split refresh between them, but I'll touch on that more in a little bit.

See, while I would divide the currency, I would not divide the aspects. Since the game is really about that line between mortality and divinity, I would view every aspect with an eye on trying to figure out it's mundane and its mythic resonance. Something like "Bad Temper" is straightforward enough on a mundane level, but on a mythic level it might shake the earth or call storms from the sky or otherwise be something dramatic and destructive. Basically, how would this aspect play out if Odin had it? By the same token, a divine compel is can be more dramatic and metaphorical - it may well be that the character is literally attacked by demons of anger as a compel on his Bad Temper.

With that understanding, the division in currency hopefully becomes more apparent. How and invocation or a compel plays ties to which currency is used. If the player uses his bad temper to punch a guy, he spends a mortal FP. If he uses it to strike down the bar with furious thunder, he spends a divine FP. Similarly, if his bad temper gets him in trouble with the cops, that might earn a mundane FP, while drawing the attention of one of the Furies might earn a divine FP.

Given that, you get a nice dial on how divine things get and how fast. You could start the game with nothing but mortal FP and introduce divine FP solely through compels, and as the game progresses, you could start splitting the refresh pool of FP between divine & Mortal points, so after a few sessions, players may begin play with 2 divine point and 8 mortal ones. This also has the interesting twist that as the game grows more divine, _mortal_ fp become rarer and it becomes harder to go to the bar for a beer without things being EPIC.

For artifacts and such, I would be inclined to go for a more abstract system of putting aspects on these items that correlate with their legend. These are pretty much purely divine aspects, but depending on the artifact might allow one or more free tags. That could get fiddly, and it depends a lot on how central you want artifacts to be.

One other things that suits the flavor of things is that I would make it _harder_ to change aspects. Whereas they can be changed between sessions out of convenience in SOTC, changing aspects should be part of the character's legend, and therefor a little more central to play.

All in all, I'm not sure I'd even use stunts. The <a href="http://evilhat.wikidot.com/stuntless-rules">Stuntless Rules</a> may end up an even easier, and amped up i think that might set some nice yardsticks for things a divine invocation might be able to do over and above granting a bigger bonus than usual. I'd also suggest switching to the <a href="http://evilhat.wikidot.com/faster-conflicts">-2/-4/-6</a> consequence system - it's an idea of Lenny's which I think it a concrete improvement on the SOTC rules.

All in all though, I think this is a great idea, and I hope that if it happens you'll post about it.

-Rob D.
 

CaffeineBoy

Vaguely sinister...
Validated User
Rob -- that's why I love you guys (and your game)! That's frickin' brilliant, and tossed off to your fans on an open forum like a divine lightning bolt of brainstormy goodness. The split currency idea completely makes it... I've been trying to figure out a way to play American Gods without resorting to buying Scion and right here, you laid it all out in a paragraph. I am in awe.

So... is Dresden done yet? :D
 

stack0v3rflow

New member
Wow. That is a cool idea. I was just thinking this morning that I felt like a Scion-like game, but didn't know if I wanted to tackle all of the rules. But that was a great answer and compromise.
 

chiguayante

biggest sword of them all
I would be tempted to introduce two currencies - mortal and Divine fate points. Maybe split refresh between them, but I'll touch on that more in a little bit.

See, while I would divide the currency, I would not divide the aspects. Since the game is really about that line between mortality and divinity, I would view every aspect with an eye on trying to figure out it's mundane and its mythic resonance. Something like "Bad Temper" is straightforward enough on a mundane level, but on a mythic level it might shake the earth or call storms from the sky or otherwise be something dramatic and destructive. Basically, how would this aspect play out if Odin had it? By the same token, a divine compel is can be more dramatic and metaphorical - it may well be that the character is literally attacked by demons of anger as a compel on his Bad Temper.

With that understanding, the division in currency hopefully becomes more apparent. How and invocation or a compel plays ties to which currency is used. If the player uses his bad temper to punch a guy, he spends a mortal FP. If he uses it to strike down the bar with furious thunder, he spends a divine FP. Similarly, if his bad temper gets him in trouble with the cops, that might earn a mundane FP, while drawing the attention of one of the Furies might earn a divine FP.

Given that, you get a nice dial on how divine things get and how fast. You could start the game with nothing but mortal FP and introduce divine FP solely through compels, and as the game progresses, you could start splitting the refresh pool of FP between divine & Mortal points, so after a few sessions, players may begin play with 2 divine point and 8 mortal ones. This also has the interesting twist that as the game grows more divine, _mortal_ fp become rarer and it becomes harder to go to the bar for a beer without things being EPIC.

For artifacts and such, I would be inclined to go for a more abstract system of putting aspects on these items that correlate with their legend. These are pretty much purely divine aspects, but depending on the artifact might allow one or more free tags. That could get fiddly, and it depends a lot on how central you want artifacts to be.

One other things that suits the flavor of things is that I would make it _harder_ to change aspects. Whereas they can be changed between sessions out of convenience in SOTC, changing aspects should be part of the character's legend, and therefor a little more central to play.

All in all, I'm not sure I'd even use stunts. The <a href="http://evilhat.wikidot.com/stuntless-rules">Stuntless Rules</a> may end up an even easier, and amped up i think that might set some nice yardsticks for things a divine invocation might be able to do over and above granting a bigger bonus than usual. I'd also suggest switching to the <a href="http://evilhat.wikidot.com/faster-conflicts">-2/-4/-6</a> consequence system - it's an idea of Lenny's which I think it a concrete improvement on the SOTC rules.

All in all though, I think this is a great idea, and I hope that if it happens you'll post about it.

-Rob D.

This is why I love you :)
 

stack0v3rflow

New member
Any thoughts on Fatebinding?

I was thinking that maybe the second use of a divine fate point by a scion in a scene would result in the GM choosing a mortal affected (either directly or indirectly). The mortal would then receive an aspect of being Fatebound to that scion, with a note as to the Fatebound Role. This aspect is usually treated as a major consequence (i.e. removed after the story), but if the scion spends more divine fate points (two more? just one more?), the GM may upgrade it to a permanent aspect.

The Fatebound Role acts like any other aspect. It can be compelled and can earn the Fated fate points. These special fate points (not called fated fate points because it starts sounding like a Dr. Seuss game at that point) can be spent to give the Scion that the Fatebound is Fated to bonus and penalties on their actions in accordance to Reverence. These bonus and penalties are at the mortal fate point level, but can also cost a Scion a mortal fate point if the Scion allows a friend Fated to be harmed without trying to save them or an unfriendly Fated to live without trying to destroy them.


Obviously they still need work, but one of the areas where I wanted to streamline the rules for Scion is to take out the rolling. I also want it to start out small, so if the characters begin and divine fate points are rare, Fatebinding won't happen often.
 

devlin1

Human Paraquat
Validated User
I clicked on this thread out of idle curiosity and ended up being given a sweet mechnical idea from one of those awesome Evil Hat guys. Thanks Rob!
 
Top Bottom