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Tales from the loop - I want this but...

Kevin Mowery

WAUGH!
Validated User
Note that the movies this convention is based on are themselves based on the very real issue of 'latchkey kids' that was prevalent (at least in the USA) through the 1970s and 1980s. The stereotypical situation was that the Boomer parents were more interested in whatever they were doing and let the kids run around doing whatever. So there are a lot of movies in the early 80s where kids who are out on their own go on an adventure.
I remember back in the 1970s and early '80s, when I wasn't even in the double digits of age yet, I'd routinely go outside to play in the morning with the expectation that I'd be back for dinner, or by dark if I didn't have a watch.
 

Gee4orce

Registered User
Validated User
Yeah, we'd go off and play in the woods (which we needed a lift to get to) and basically disappear up there for the entire day until we got a lift home. And I'd regularly go off cycling on my own tens of miles from home. Now as a parent, I couldn't contemplate that!
 

bentleyml

Strange Apparition
Validated User
I grew up in the 70s/80s too. Until 3rd grade I lived in the city and while we were expected to stay in someones yard, we were allowed to travel freely to get to each others house. When we moved to the country we were pretty much allowed to go where ever we wanted as long as we were home by dark or in time for supper. The people we rented from owned about 100 acres of land, most of which was wooded. So we had lots of places to go to.

One set of forest was definitely one that was planted (or I think so) because all the trees were in perfect rows. It always made me feel uncomfortable because of just how perfectly organized the trees were. Was always worried about getting lost in that section, so I avoided it.
 

ORtrail

Registered User
Validated User
Yeah, hop on your bike and be gone all day with really no way for the parents to reach you. Perfectly normal behavior for the time, but horrifying for modern parents. That's more a commentary on how the world has changed for the worse. Now they have to worry when the kids are in school or even when taking a trip to Walmart.

B bentleyml ; we have some tree farms in the area and I agree that perfect rows of trees are bit creepy. I included tree farms in my fictional Loop location in the Columbia River Gorge just for that effect.
 

Cybe

Registered User
Validated User
I think, if anything, it's an indicator of how our perception of the world has changed.
 

ORtrail

Registered User
Validated User
I think, if anything, it's an indicator of how our perception of the world has changed.
More than just perception of the world; mass shootings were much less frequent then they are today. We are more aware then ever thanks to being constantly connected to the internet, but simple numbers tell us things have grown much worse since 1985.
 

Strange Visitor

Grumpy Grognard
Validated User
More than just perception of the world; mass shootings were much less frequent then they are today. We are more aware then ever thanks to being constantly connected to the internet, but simple numbers tell us things have grown much worse since 1985.
While not wrong, the chance of this mattering to an individual parent regarding one of their children still adds up to a rounding error. That's why perception actually plays a larger part.
 

Tricksy and False

Social Justice Murderhobo
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I also grew up in an era of being a kid and allowed to wander around the country-side and small US city I grew up in as long as I was home by dark.

From my perspective, the events that changed this were not mass shootings, but the news coverage and movie re-enactment of the abduction and murder of Adam Walsh. I think this led to a domino effect of growing mainstream awareness of child kidnappings, child abuse, and child sexual abuse, though a slightly misplaced focus on strangers committing these sorts of crimes rather than people known to the child.
 
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vitus979

Registered User
RPGnet Member
Validated User
From my perspective, the events that changed this were not mass shootings, but the news coverage and movie re-enactment of the abduction and murder of Adam Walsh which led to a domino effect of growing mainstream awareness of child kidnappings, child abuse, and child sexual abuse, though a slightly misplaced focus on strangers committing these sorts of crimes rather than people known to the child.
Yes, the kidnapping hysteria and Stranger Danger in the 1980s, a decade in which kidnappings of children statistically decreased. :rolleyes:
 

Tricksy and False

Social Justice Murderhobo
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Yes, the kidnapping hysteria and Stranger Danger in the 1980s, a decade in which kidnappings of children statistically decreased. :rolleyes:
I'm not sure what you're trying to communicate here.

Are you rolling your eyes at my assertion that the 1980s Stranger Danger panic is a contributing factor to the US's changing perspective on how safe it is to let your kids wander town and country unsupervised?

Are you rolling your eyes at the panic itself arising in an era when kidnappings were on the decline?
 
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