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tell me everything you can of "Skyrealms of Jorune"

Mark Berryman

New member
Banned
Hi please tell me of Skyrealms of Jorune I know nothing about it...
anything and everything about system and setting and so on...

what makes the game cool give me something to hook onto
 

Lars Dangly

Registered User
Validated User
I played a 2-year campaign of Jorune and really loved it. What I most liked were the distinctive world, character types and creatures. There are many, many fantasy or sci-fi settings out there in the gaming omniverse, and most are frankly derivative or 2-dimensional. Jorune managed that feeling of novelty combined with grounding in reality that marks the frew really successful creations out there (e.g., Glorantha). I don't remember many details about the system, other than that it was exciting to play (trending toward the gritty side of the spectrum) and had destinctive (even idiosyncratic) mechanics. Finally, the graphic design and artwork are first rate. A great game.
 

randlathor66

Registered User
Validated User
The thing that struck me (in a good way) about Jorune, is its alien-ness. It was one of the very few settigns that, eventhough there were humans, was not just another alti-Earth. Jorune was different. As was Talislanta, though Jorune was a much better product, overall. I cannot tell you about the rules system, as I have not played it in decades.
 

Griffon Games

Game Store Guy
Validated User
so it's strange
what the normal pc?
what do they do?
what can they do?
For me, that was always the problem. They never really defined this too well. Characters (at least in the early version that I remember) were attempting to become citizens or some such. I suppose that this was supposed to give you a reason to be out exploring and such, but I never really felt like they provided much in the way of motivation. That coupled with the alienness of the setting made trying to run the game difficult.

Still, the early Miles Teves artwork made me DESPERATELY want to fully understand the world so that I could run a game of it.
 

PeevishPrussian

aka The Grouchy German
so it's strange
what the normal pc?
what do they do?
what can they do?
It was more stated/implied in one edition than the other (and I can't remember which as it was decades ago) but the basic gist of the game as I understood it was trying to get citizenship in Burdoth (or was it Ardoth?).

You did this by getting existing citizens to sponsor you by basically stamping your citizen application on the Drenn Wall (or something like that...). How did you get them to stamp you? By doing favors for them, essentially quests.

For there it was pretty much like any rpg as far as adventuring ideas go in my experience: escort a caravan, deal with bandits, etc
 

Grymbok

Licensed to Ill
Validated User
It was more stated/implied in one edition than the other (and I can't remember which as it was decades ago) but the basic gist of the game as I understood it was trying to get citizenship in Burdoth (or was it Ardoth?).

You did this by getting existing citizens to sponsor you by basically stamping your citizen application on the Drenn Wall (or something like that...). How did you get them to stamp you? By doing favors for them, essentially quests.

For there it was pretty much like any rpg as far as adventuring ideas go in my experience: escort a caravan, deal with bandits, etc
Ardoth is the capital of Burdoth.

The society of Ardoth, with its strange more of acquiring citizenship, is apparently based on classical Athens. Went right over my head, sadly - I never even clicked that that was the tech level being described from the material in the books, and Tothis (the process by which non-citizens attempt to become citizens) always seemed to me to be largely akin to the Scout's bob-a-job week.

Anyway - the typical PC in a game of Jorune is either a baseline human, or one of two humanoid offshoots called Boccord and Muadra. Humans are colonists from Earth, but as Jorune is set 3,500 years post-colony and is a post-post-apocalyptic game (there's several apocalypses of one degree of severity or another in the post colony history, but they're all hundreds of years ago now) no-one on Jorune remembers where they came from, and technology is all long since forgotten.

The planet of Jorune is shrouded in a mysterious energy source called Isho. I mention this so that I can better explain Boccord and Muadra. Muadra are mutated humans who can manipulate Isho in to a variety of orbs, bolts and other effects. Boccord are mutated humans who are in-tune with the Isho wind and can use it to sense creatures and read auras etc. (the only intelligent Jorune-native race, the Shanthas, can do both).

Outside of the baseline "I want to be a citizen so I get involved with local people" adventure, Jorune's post-apocalyptic status means that the traditional dungeon-diving is an option, with both Earth-Tec technology caches and lost Shanthic Temples offering riches to the careful treasure hunter. Also, the titular Skyrealms are supposed to be laden with riches for exploitation (there are issues with this but they're handwavable easily enough without going too far from canon). Beyond that, on a political level Jorune is a mess, with large numbers of sentient races who don't get a long (there's good reasons for this but they're spoilery so I'll omit them for now).

Bottom line - Jorune is a wonderfully rich but often poorly explained setting, with the problem that the default starting location is arguable the most dull place in the setting.
 
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