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The Boys - new superhero show from Amazon

Dave999

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For me personally, I found it more palatable because Robin is introduced and dies within a single scene. She's barely more than a background character, and the audience is given no real time to build a connection with her or invest in her relationships or arc. Its just "oh hey Robin", followed by 20 seconds of onscreen banter, then *splat*. A lot of time fridging is used a shortcut to audience investment--"let's make them love this cool female character, then have the bad guy kill her so they're really hate him!"--and this fast-forwarded past all of that emotional manipulation. There are cool, fleshed-out women in The Boys--I genuinely think Starlight is fantastic, Maeve's stirrings of a conscience beneath her studied indifference are interesting, and even Stillwell is a terrific and very original kind of villain--but Robin isn't one of them. Robin's not anything really except a brief setup to a very dark punchline. They aren't trying to make her anyone's favorite before she dies, and while Hughie certainly hates A-Train for killing her, the show isn't really concerned with making the audience feel the same way. In fact, Hughie's arc is to ultimately decide that using Robin's death as a justification for revenge is complete bullshit.
There's a lot of interesting things to unpack about Stillwell being a woman in this story, especially given her role in facillitating the misogynist culture of the Seven as well as their corporate empire.

The gender swap made her quite a more interesting, IMHO.
 

Tambourine

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I'm still at the beginning watching the first episode, but I have to say that the show did not exactly endear itself to me by having the very first (innocent) person to die be the first woman of color to appear on screen, so yea. The rest is looking good so far, though.
 

Dave999

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I'm still at the beginning watching the first episode, but I have to say that the show did not exactly endear itself to me by having the very first (innocent) person to die be the first woman of color to appear on screen, so yea. The rest is looking good so far, though.
There's an interesting question whether it's better or worse that the person who killed her was a man of color.
 

Tambourine

Spirit Princess
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Better or worse than what?
I'm just saying that based on my personal first impressions of just a few minutes ago it's not a good look, especially since said victim was put on screen by establishing her as the significant other to what I assume to be the white male audience self insert.
 

Dave999

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Better or worse than what?
I'm just saying that based on my personal first impressions of just a few minutes ago it's not a good look, especially since said victim was put on screen by establishing her as the significant other to what I assume to be the white male audience self insert.
I'm not arguing with you on it. Your first impression is entirely yours.

It's just something I've been thinking about the fact there's a variety of treatment of POC in the show--good, bad, and terribad. Some people like the fact A-Train is a horrible horrible person like the white cast while other thinks he plays into bad stereotypes.
 

Tambourine

Spirit Princess
Validated User
He may or may not be and I may or may not enjoy that fact down the road, but the scene and the further narrative frames Robin's death in terms of what happens to the white male self insert, not in terms of A-Train's character let alone the tragedy of being collateral damage to a superhero.

It also doesn't help that its violence is gratuitous in a very Snyderesque way, to the point where I first assumed it would establish how grotesque that whole world is, except we then center in on the white male self insert's man pain and man rage and it feels like the show wants me to feel sympathetic for 'the ordinary guy', which doesn't really gel with said grotesque and absurd violence I experienced just minutes earlier.

Again, I did actually enjoy the rest of it so far, but I feel like the first episode suffers from frequent tonal whiplash that I don't really know how to deal with.
 

Dave999

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He may or may not be and I may or may not enjoy that fact down the road, but the scene and the further narrative frames Robin's death in terms of what happens to the white male self insert, not in terms of A-Train's character let alone the tragedy of being collateral damage to a superhero.

It also doesn't help that its violence is gratuitous in a very Snyderesque way, to the point where I first assumed it would establish how grotesque that whole world is, except we then center in on the white male self insert's man pain and man rage and it feels like the show wants me to feel sympathetic for 'the ordinary guy', which doesn't really gel with said grotesque and absurd violence I experienced just minutes earlier.

Again, I did actually enjoy the rest of it so far, but I feel like the first episode suffers from frequent tonal whiplash that I don't really know how to deal with.
Oh yes, Hughie's story is pretty much very comic book stereotypical. It's also weird because the story is 90% about white male celebrity privilege.
 

Rupert

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A lot of people have speculated it's Karl Urban's natural Kiwi but the result of what happens when you disguise your voice for decades.
As a New Zealander, Urban’s accent in this comes across as “Kiwi who spent a while in the UK”.
 

Kuildeous

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I think Robin the character exists as part of the show's examination of the whole concept of fridging itself and the use of dead women to motivate angry men.


Spoiler: Show
Hell... look at how it ends. Huey declines to take effective revenge on the supe who killed his girlfriend, while Butcher goes to monstrous lengths to take innefectual revenge on the supe who turns out *not* to have assaulted or killed his wife. it's a critique that works on a couple of levels, breaking down the metatextual fictional concept of fridging and revenge narratives and also breaking down an aspect of toxic masculinity that promotes violence in response to emotional pain and loss and the parts of toxic masculinity that makes rage-fueled revenge stories themselves attractive. it's a pretty solid drubbing for fridging and manpain murderfantasy.
I just have to say that I really appreciate your spoilery assessment. Great analysis.
 

thenorm42

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I actually enjoyed how terrible Karl Urban's accent was. I was waiting for a Fly-Man reveal too.

I thought the most telling thing for Hughie's character was the relative ease with which he brushed off the revelation that Translucent had a son, and he even sees a vision of Robin not that long after. Faced with a choice between guilt and vengeance, he chooses vengeance. He might be a lot more effective than Butcher in the long run.

Also looking forward to Frenchie's old and new girlfriends finally meeting...
 
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