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The Comic Book Ruleset 80's style.

poppa_corgi

Retired User
Now I'm the last one out of the gate on a regular basis when coming up with ideas so asking -if- is usually unproductive.

I'm a kid of the 70's and teen of the 80's and with late night fogginess an incredibly weird idea hit me that I have never heard of before. A web search provided nothing and the idea seems possible.

Is it possible to write an 'introduction' to D&D (extremely simplified Basic Mentzer rules) as an 80's style comic book?


I highly suspect that it may already exist as a Double-thick edition compared to whatever was 'average' back in those days.
(post edit) Seems like 45 to 50 pages on average for a single comic in the 80's. Depending on who was publishing the comic, Adverts, letters and pinups often took from zero to 10 pages of the comic. (edit done)

My second suspicion is that it would illustrate basic gameplay and act more as an advertisement than a sample rule set.

Various elements that tease and intrigue would be presented in abundance; A sample map to follow the characters journey through a 'dungeon' like tomb; A fourth wall that switches between everyday players and their characters seemingly linked by a chance of fate; and let us not forget the voice of the narrator presented as a floating orb guideing our blind heroes. It would of course contain an image of the supreme storyteller of all, lord gygax.

But I'm 30 years too late and a pack of hot pockets too late.

If it does not exist then it most certainly would sound like a challenge.
Or does it already exist as a rare comic, or a web comic and I am simply unable to discover its existence?

Any pointers to the failed issue or the wonderfull webcomic is greatly welcome.
 
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poppa_corgi

Retired User
I saw that one a long while back. I agree that it is a -sweet- sample game. When I read it I felt like it simply alternated images with rules. That my initial feeling that the rules were segmented are now realized for the purpose of teaching readers those rules one step at a time. It just "felt" too static and immobile; that it didn't have the visual flow of a real comic book. I am no comic book author so please forgive me to imagining the impossible.

I did however print out many of those pages. As printer paper makes excellent water-color painting paper and I haven't touched those things in YEARS. Construction paper underneath as a water mop and scotch tape to hold it flat. Offline cheap childish fun.
 

Madcat

motorbikin'
Validated User
I think it's a bit of a thing with Japanese RPGs to have comics illustrating the game being played, showing both the players, their characters, rules talk and IC talk.
 

poppa_corgi

Retired User
Oh nice. Any online examples of the Japanese RPG comics I can look at?

Contemplating what a comic book might look like I imagine 2 potential presentation styles.
1: The First idea is that it is produced as a 'choose your own adventure' style book, either by numbered pages or numbered panels.
2: The Second is to alternate pages. One page of rules on the left side, and comic a book style example on the right. Or possibly split pages for small examples. Divided top and bottom, or dual panels, left side rules, right side comic.

In either concept the final product is something that has an organic flow to them.
 
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smarttman

I do some stuff
Validated User
Oh nice. Any online examples of the Japanese RPG comics I can look at?

Contemplating what a comic book might look like I imagine 2 potential presentation styles.
1: The First idea is that it is produced as a 'choose your own adventure' style book, either by numbered pages or numbered panels.
2: The Second is to alternate pages. One page of rules on the left side, and comic a book style example on the right. Or possibly split pages for small examples. Divided top and bottom, or dual panels, left side rules, right side comic.

In either concept the final product is something that has an organic flow to them.
If you can scrounge up Tenra Bansho Zero, that does this style of thing
 

poppa_corgi

Retired User
Reread that ole' Chick Track. The actual represented game is minor compared to the social drama that is the usual over the top Chick Tract routine. It's so small that I'm not sure if its a tabletop and larp combo. It doesn't really instruct either.
Shawn Gaston gets a tiny smiley face sticker for a good effort.
Asacolips gets a Gold star sticker. :)
Smarttman gets a BIG gold star sticker!
 
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Panda-s1

NO NOT BLACK LEAF NO! D:
I think it's a bit of a thing with Japanese RPGs to have comics illustrating the game being played, showing both the players, their characters, rules talk and IC talk.
Oh nice. Any online examples of the Japanese RPG comics I can look at?

Contemplating what a comic book might look like I imagine 2 potential presentation styles.
1: The First idea is that it is produced as a 'choose your own adventure' style book, either by numbered pages or numbered panels.
2: The Second is to alternate pages. One page of rules on the left side, and comic a book style example on the right. Or possibly split pages for small examples. Divided top and bottom, or dual panels, left side rules, right side comic.

In either concept the final product is something that has an organic flow to them.
I own copies of both Sword World RPG, and Double Cross, both kinda popular Japanese RPGs, but neither book has any kind of manga instruction :/ (though Double Cross does feature a few comic pages as art). Really detailed examples of play are in both, IIRC, which is something I'd like to see more often in RPGs outside of Japan.

(also there's an official translation of Double Cross into English and no one told me, I don't know how to feel about this as it both happened without me noticing, and I don't have the money to buy the books Orz )
 
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