The OGL versus my website

Mithras

5859B7 Age 48 7 Terms
Validated User
Hi, I've been slaving away over an historical setting for D&D recently, and I'm about to put it up on my website. There's a few rule tweaks, but mostly its solid campaign stuff, character class interpretations and more.

But what about the Licence? How do I stand putting stuff up on the web as opposed to publishing it under the terms of the OGL? Is it kosher? I wouldn't bat an eyelid if it were a conversion for Feng Shui, but here I like to tread warily!

Any advice appreciated.
 
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NPC Peter

Guest
You can put anything you want on your website, you don't need to put up a license if it's free fan-created material. The wizards web policy is extremely lenient. In short- you do not need to worry about the OGL.

If you are selling d20 material, or if you just feel like being clever and making open source material that can be openly used by other publishers, you can set one up. Just go to http://opengamingfoundation.org, get a copy of OGL 1.0a and update it like I did:

Http://the-never.net/ogl.html

Remember to update section 15 and include some indication of what material you want to be considered 'open source' and what you want closed source. You are officially giving <i>publishers</i> the right to re-publish/distribute anything you designate as open source by doing this.
 

Mithras

5859B7 Age 48 7 Terms
Validated User
NPC Peter said:
You can put anything you want on your website, you don't need to put up a license if it's free fan-created material.
Thanks Peter, thats the kind of warm fuzzy advice I was after :)

So you've been brave enough to negotiate the WotC legalese?
 
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NPC Peter

Guest
Yes. There isn't much to it, actually. The rules to the d20 license are fairly simple, especially if your'e not doing anything special.

Basicly it amounts to
1)designate what is your own material
2) designate what is 'open source'
3) including the license when you distribute
4) not using anyone else's property that isn't covered under another open license OR the SRD (or in other words, you can't create and sell any Star Wars adventures, or sell your own Forgotten Realms stuff. )
5) the minor stuff- use of contributor credits for example is fairly easy to follow.
6)Update section 15 (the copyright notice). This used to be the big offender with d20 stuff- people would forget to do this (even AEG I think). What eventually happened though was someone put out that big 'Twin Crowns' book and completely ignored putting in an OGL license at all.

The d20 trademark device is a little different and has it's own requirements, but it isn't that hard to deal with either. The d20 trademark license is the one that will restrict your ability to put in a non-standard character creation section, for example.
 

Moochava

Your Movement Sucks
Woohoo!

Woohoo! More stuff by Mithras! Give us details! Tell us when it's out! I need more nifty historical stuff to play with!

---------------
Kyle Marquis
 

Mithras

5859B7 Age 48 7 Terms
Validated User
Re: Woohoo!

Moochava said:
Woohoo! More stuff by Mithras! Give us details!
Whoa Kyle! Don't get too excited, please ... it's only a classical Greek setting in the mid-4th century BC. May not be your thing.

Rather than just cough up a few pages of class/weapon conversions I've decided to give it a campaign setting, give characters a reason for adventuring. A bit like Glorantha's 'Hero Wars'.

I'll polish it up and put it up on the web site in a week or two.

Thanks for the interest!
 
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