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Sonsaku

Draconian GM on TBP
Validated User
That's easy, the character sheet is the one that they constantly have to reference. They doodle on what they focus on. It doesn't have to make sense to you, but it might be key to keeping their mind focused on the game. I game with some people with really bad ADHD (one can't even sit at the table and constantly stands and walks around even when running the game) and what you describe sounds like things they do to manage. Their brains just work differently than yours.
And thus they get a fidget spinner to play with. Frankly there is room for acomodating stuff for people with issue but if one side has to make all the compromise and the other wont even do something as basic as "dont doodle where the stats are do it on the side" then is an issue.
 

Skaorn

Registered User
Validated User
And thus they get a fidget spinner to play with. Frankly there is room for acomodating stuff for people with issue but if one side has to make all the compromise and the other wont even do something as basic as "dont doodle where the stats are do it on the side" then is an issue.
The fidget spinner might keep them from focusing on the game though. All I'm saying is that doodling on the character sheet might be a way to distract part of their brain while letting the other part focus on the game it self. What you see as a lack of self control may in fact be their self control. The fidget spinner might work for them but it might also mean that they are not really present for your game because it doesn't do anything to ground them to the game.
 

Ven

Registered User
Validated User
And thus they get a fidget spinner to play with. Frankly there is room for acomodating stuff for people with issue but if one side has to make all the compromise and the other wont even do something as basic as "dont doodle where the stats are do it on the side" then is an issue.
I supply the character sheet so I expect to be able to do anything with it so long as it's still legible after. Filling in the O's & 0's and delicately adding long hair or eyes & a mouth... yes that does keep me occupied but still focussed on the game when my PC isn't actively engaged. Fidget spinners are a horrid distraction.
Each to their own.
 

DarkMum

Godamn Catwoman
Validated User
And thus they get a fidget spinner to play with. Frankly there is room for acomodating stuff for people with issue but if one side has to make all the compromise and the other wont even do something as basic as "dont doodle where the stats are do it on the side" then is an issue.
How about you stop assuming a one size fits all solution will solve the problem for every 'Problem Player'?
Because you are assuming that your one solution applies to all non-neurotypical players, and that is not only foolish, but activly hurtful and shows a stunning lack of understanding.

Which might explain why you are getting a lot of hostile comments...
Because you're treating all non-neurotypical people with disrespect by doing so.
 

Bren at RPG Net

Registered User
Validated User
If the concern is doodling causing unreadable character sheets, why not keep an electronic copy of the character sheet? I rather doubt the doodler is doodling all over that.

And one can print out one or two hard copies of the sheet to avoid needing to use an electronic device just to play a table top RPG.
 

rstites

Active member
Validated User
Because you're treating all non-neurotypical people with disrespect by doing so.
For that matter, a lot of us that are (most likely) considered neurotypical also doodle on things. It's my character sheet, so I'll doodle on it if I want to. If you need a copy of my character sheet for some reason, make up your own! (OK, I actually doodle on scratch paper where I keep notes, but still if I wanted to, I'd doodle on my character sheet.)

If you handed me a fidget spinner, I'd probably have a pretty specific suggestion of what you should do with it! ;)
 

DarkMum

Godamn Catwoman
Validated User
For that matter, a lot of us that are (most likely) considered neurotypical also doodle on things. It's my character sheet, so I'll doodle on it if I want to. If you need a copy of my character sheet for some reason, make up your own! (OK, I actually doodle on scratch paper where I keep notes, but still if I wanted to, I'd doodle on my character sheet.)

If you handed me a fidget spinner, I'd probably have a pretty specific suggestion of what you should do with it! ;)
Indeed, the phrase "Sun don't shine!" springs readily to my mind, but I'm glad to see I'm not the only one with that reaction.

I return to a more pleasant point about data retention and handwritten documents, as I meant to before, in that I can still recall the name, race, level, basic stats and combat notes for the first AD&D character I played, but all I can recall of most of the video game D&D characters I've played is the names.

Muscle memory in handwriting is evidently a more integrated system of information storage than we like to give it credit for. :)
 

Sonsaku

Draconian GM on TBP
Validated User
🔴 Warning + Threadban
Which might explain why you are getting a lot of hostile comments...
Because you're treating all non-neurotypical people with disrespect by doing so.
The hippocresy of the comment are laughable at best as they basically boil down with "person X has a disruptive habbit and it should be accomodate while the person shouldnt put any effort on the matter"

It's my character sheet, so I'll doodle on it if I want to. If you need a copy of my character sheet for some reason, make up your own!

lIf you handed me a fidget spinner, I'd probably have a pretty specific suggestion of what you should do with it! ;)
if they were are so deadset in annoying the person who has to dm you without doing ANY of the other options to reach a compromise (doodling on the back/unused space, piece of paper, fidget, tower dice, phone) i would kick that person out and they can find someone to accomodate their annoying. habit while he confortably does nothing.

But to be fair its true, its their character sheet and they can doodle them to the point of unreadability if they want. Its also the DMs game, and he can kick out said player if they want.

If the concern is doodling causing unreadable character sheets, why not keep an electronic copy of the character sheet? I rather doubt the doodler is doodling all over that.

And one can print out one or two hard copies of the sheet to avoid needing to use an electronic device just to play a table top RPG.
Personally the electronic sheet has 2 issues one is that one has to have the means to use it (have a pc in the room or own a laptop/tablet) and the copy has to be updated which can be a hassle.
 
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Tanka

We See You
Staff member
Moderator
Validated User
The hippocresy of the comment are laughable at best as they basically boil down with "person X has a disruptive habbit and it should be accomodate while the person shouldnt put any effort on the matter"



And to be fair if they were are so deadset in annoying the person who has to dm you without doing ANY of the other options to reach a compromise (doodling on the back/unused space, piece of paper, fidget, tower dice, phone) i would kick that person out and they can find someone to accomodate their annoying. habit while he confortably does nothing

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Leave the thread.
 

rstites

Active member
Validated User
I return to a more pleasant point about data retention and handwritten documents, as I meant to before, in that I can still recall the name, race, level, basic stats and combat notes for the first AD&D character I played, but all I can recall of most of the video game D&D characters I've played is the names.

Muscle memory in handwriting is evidently a more integrated system of information storage than we like to give it credit for. :)
I noted this above in response to you, but will elaborate a little on it. A year ago I did a full course in teaching: after 25 years of instructing university students, I finally took my first actual education courses! :) Anyhow, I learned quite a lot in it, and one thing that really stood out to me was how much they pushed handwritten notes as reinforcement for material in the course, and how much stronger that reinforcement is than any other approach.

I can't recall many specifics of my first D&D character, other than he had a rolled strength of 3 and died in a trap before the first encounter with another creature: fell to his death in a basic pit trap. We went through so many in the early days that I can only recall the ones with inappropriate names.
 
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