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Toon physics mechanics.

Xeedrenamon

New member
Okay, I'm working on a game about cartoon characters and a big part of the game is the use of toon physics.

I took inspiration from don't rest your head and use kind of a dice pool depending on the degree one is warping reality. An example would be small things like reaching into a body pocket to get a common object like a phone or a light is a free action but pulling out a bazooka or ye old lantern uses one die, negating damage from things like being shot or high falls is three dice and finally doings like dropping a battleship from space or pulling down a completely different location from nowhere is six dice, the maximum amount.

The cost is basically the more outrageous something is the worse the chaos during the aftermath is going to be, in universe the stuff on TV is done in controlled environments by professionals, out in the wild it can get nasty.

There is toon tools too that ether use less dice but are very rare or negate the dice pool for a very nasty quirk.

The system is get more evens/passes than a target number.

Does anyone have any suggestions on making this better?
 

John Out West

Registered User
Validated User
First off, lovely idea. I could see this being really fun.

I might suggest it costing one die per rule being broken. An anvil is too large and heavy to fit into a pocket, so that's one rule and costs one die. Running over a Chasm breaks two rules, as there is no ground to run on, and you are defying gravity. Running into a painting would... I"m not sure how many rules that breaks, but its a lot i'm sure.
I'm not sure what system you are running (or what Dont Rest Your Head is) but i'm assuming you require a certain number of successes from a limited pool of dice. Either way i think going by "Rules Broken" would work well.

The character creation implications of this game are too intriguing for me to focus on for long without trying to create a system.

Hope this helps.
 

Xander

Registered User
Validated User
Maybe a gameplay example would help.

I would think a toon game should be very fast-paced, without stopping to count dice.

What's the impact of intensifying chaos? Is like like Roger Rabbit where toons are in the real world?

Maybe the DM should gather the chaos dice secretly, and at times, the universe snaps back into order when the DM cashes in.
 

Nate_MI

Hail Tzeentch!
Validated User
First off, lovely idea. I could see this being really fun.

I might suggest it costing one die per rule being broken. An anvil is too large and heavy to fit into a pocket, so that's one rule and costs one die. Running over a Chasm breaks two rules, as there is no ground to run on, and you are defying gravity. Running into a painting would... I"m not sure how many rules that breaks, but its a lot i'm sure.
I'm not sure what system you are running (or what Dont Rest Your Head is) but i'm assuming you require a certain number of successes from a limited pool of dice. Either way i think going by "Rules Broken" would work well.

The character creation implications of this game are too intriguing for me to focus on for long without trying to create a system.

Hope this helps.
But how do you count how many rules it is? Pulling an anvil out of your pocket -- surely that's both "It's too big to fit in your pocket" and "it's too heavy for your trousers to retain in." While surviving a forty-story fall is merely "no one is tough enough to survive this."
 

Xeedrenamon

New member
The system works like this, normal and mundane actions are handled by the GM picking a target number and how many dice will be in the pool.

The setting is the "real world" where a few toons from a cartoon world fell into and have to keep from being discovered while trying to get home.

The impact of chaos is when something goes wrong, it goes very wrong. From simple gags like pulling out the wrong item or dropping a car engine on one's foot and unable to much next turn or looking down mid air walk before falling to down right nasty like only teleporting only half a person during "scene changes" because they were in the wrong spot or collapsing a building because they made the painted tunnel in the wrong place, or the boxing gloves takes the guy's head off instead of just stunning them.
 

kenco

Registered User
Validated User
Does anyone have any suggestions on making this better?
I have only two (and quite random) thoughts about this.

(1) the more unexpected the idea is the EASIER it is to pull it off. If we've seen it before in real life or in this scene (or adventure? or series?) that's a big chaos amplifier/ success killer. Unexpected must somehow be judged by a human or group of humans participating in the game, not by some kind of rule or table of 'unexpectedness'.

Alternatively, your toon physics always works, and the more unexpected you make it, the more bonus dice/ plot points or whatever you get for future actions that DON'T involve toon physics (R).

(2) it's not the chaotic-ness or otherwise of your action that determines what dice you roll, but the quality of your recent dice rolls (who has the upper hand or the initiative or whatever) that determines how much toon-ness you can get away with. Wile Coyote always falls off the cliff because the Roadrunner always has more dice. The Roadrunner gets to cheat physics because it has more pips, not vice versa. Bugs Bunny seems to work pretty much the same way.

These two ideas seem contradictory. The latter seems completely incompatible with your original idea.

Good luck! 8)
 
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the gambler

Registered User
Validated User
A suggestion related to kenco's post. At one stage I was using a home brew mechanic which was:

1. roll as many d6s as you want.
2. each 4+ is a success
3. if you roll double 1s, its a Mishap - the action fails regardless of successes rolled
4. if you roll triple '1's its a Calamity - the action fails AND you suffer a spectacular screw-up of some sort

So the basic idea is that the more dice you roll, the greater the chance of success, but the greater the chance of screwing up as well. Is this of any use to you?

I did a variant for a wargame, roll up to 8 dice, 4+ are successes, if you roll triples the action fails ....
 

Faethor

Registered User
Validated User
I think toon physics could be fun with a very unique set of 'rules' .

Example

1) Rule of Comedy
Sure Roger Rabbit could have slipped out of those handcuffs at any time but only when it was funny.

2) Rule of Impracticality
Funny has a relative connection to the degree of impracticality (a ton weight in the back pocket is impractical, used in a funny way however it becomes practical). If it isn't funny enough or a funnier 'matrix' exists you risk falling foul of the rule of slapstick or causal reality re-asserting itself.

3) Rule of Slapstick
If a funnier alternative exists and is seized on it tends to override the original intention of use. Ask Wile E Coyote, he can tell you all about it.
 

kenco

Registered User
Validated User
I think toon physics could be fun with a very unique set of 'rules' .

Example

1) Rule of Comedy
Sure Roger Rabbit could have slipped out of those handcuffs at any time but only when it was funny.

2) Rule of Impracticality
Funny has a relative connection to the degree of impracticality (a ton weight in the back pocket is impractical, used in a funny way however it becomes practical). If it isn't funny enough or a funnier 'matrix' exists you risk falling foul of the rule of slapstick or causal reality re-asserting itself.

3) Rule of Slapstick
If a funnier alternative exists and is seized on it tends to override the original intention of use. Ask Wile E Coyote, he can tell you all about it.
This is very good indeed! :)
 
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