• The Infractions Forum is available for public view. Please note that if you have been suspended you will need to open a private/incognito browser window to view it.

Trailer for The Witcher has dropped

Coyote's Own

Former ACME QA Tester.
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I don't know the franchise very well, but I do know that part of the premise is that it's a magical world originally inhabited by elves to which both humans and monsters were brought by a freak accident from a dimensional event that occurs with the kind of regularity of an ice age.
This is alos why Witchers hunt monster rather then Animals.
They were (IIRC) actually created by alchemist long ago to dal with species brought over by Conjoction of Sphere's, so they should be hunting magical animals that are native to world.
At least one occasion it the reason Geralt give for particpating in aDragon Hunt (which i assume will make it in to series as "The Bounds of Reason" is pretty good story).
 

Morticutor UK

A long way away.
Validated User
Yes, it does. (Spoilers follow)

Spoiler: Show

The elves were here first (although not necessarily still native. The Wild Hunt is not, they come in from another reality).

So there was an elf called...Lorna or something. She was a 'genetic time bomb' a woman, pointy-eared Kwizath Haderach. Only she didn't couple with another, similar elf, and produce these all-powerful elves in her bloodline as expected, she fell for a human. The humans and elves tell different stories of what happens next, but being of Elder Blood means being magically supercharged and somehow of her line.

Ciri is of Elder Blood, allowing her to do things like make friends with a unicorn and travel dimensions.

The rest is basically that humans are brutal and breed way more than the elder races and so have come to dominance, pushing the Elves out to the wild parts of the world, where there isn't much of a living to be had. The Squirrels are trying to push back against pogroms and such, but they're also pawns in a Nilfgaardian plan to weaken the Northern Realms from the inside.
 

Moritz

user, registered
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I am now reading the books (German translation from Polish), and have a question to anyone who knows the original version: is the language as weird, too? I am talking about a) very short, simple sentences b) a faux medieval style (e.g. like some people playing RPGs speak when they pretend to speak in a medieval version of their language) and at the same time c) very informal/ modern ways of talking. This is really frustrating and I'm not sure if that's how Sapkowski writes or if the translation was just bad.
 

Coyote's Own

Former ACME QA Tester.
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I am now reading the books (German translation from Polish), and have a question to anyone who knows the original version: is the language as weird, too? I am talking about a) very short, simple sentences b) a faux medieval style (e.g. like some people playing RPGs speak when they pretend to speak in a medieval version of their language) and at the same time c) very informal/ modern ways of talking. This is really frustrating and I'm not sure if that's how Sapkowski writes or if the translation was just bad.
Don't remember teh first, but t6he second and third are definitely his style.
Spakowski has strong fancrush on Sienkiewicz, so you get some archaic sounding bits (one exampke that comes to mind Wicther immunity to diseases is referedas "Immunitete", which in mordern Polish is used only for legal immunity), juxtapose with the way many character talk (Geralt could as well be written by Chandler).
 

JSpektr

Yes, that's me.
Validated User
I am now reading the books (German translation from Polish), and have a question to anyone who knows the original version: is the language as weird, too? I am talking about a) very short, simple sentences b) a faux medieval style (e.g. like some people playing RPGs speak when they pretend to speak in a medieval version of their language) and at the same time c) very informal/ modern ways of talking. This is really frustrating and I'm not sure if that's how Sapkowski writes or if the translation was just bad.
It varies. In English the earlier books are a lot more awkward, the later ones smooth out. So either he got better at writing, got a better translator, or both.
 

Moritz

user, registered
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I got two ebook collections, one is the two short story collections and the stand alone novel, the other the five novels. I'll check how it develops.
 

Coyote's Own

Former ACME QA Tester.
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I got two ebook collections, one is the two short story collections and the stand alone novel, the other the five novels. I'll check how it develops.
What's teh stand alone novel.
If it's "Season of Storms" or something like that then it wa publsihed after the cycle (I'm not sure in what orer it's suppose to be read as I haven't read it).
 

Moritz

user, registered
RPGnet Member
Validated User
The bundle is: "Der letzte Wunsch - Zeit des Sturms - Das Schwert der Vorsehung" - so I guess Season of Storms.
 

Coyote's Own

Former ACME QA Tester.
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Huh.
Das Schwert der Vorsehung is a bit weird way to translate "Miecz przeznaczenia".

Das Schwert der Beschtimung, seems like a better choice especially since the quote is "Miecz przeznaczenia ma dwa konice. Jedym jesteś ty drugim jest śmierć" (The Sword of Destiny has two end's/points =. One of them is use the other is death").
 

Moritz

user, registered
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Destiny would literally be Schicksal; Vorsehung is precognition (the Polish word actually looks a bit like it could mean that), Bestimmung OTOH is purpose.
 
Top Bottom