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Using games for settings other than the ones they were intended?

Youdontmeetinaninn

Podcast Creator
Validated User
I was wondering if anyone has any experience using rules systems for settings other than the ones that are baked into the book? Some games (I was specifically thinking of 7th Sea) have their setting seemingly intrinsic to the rules but I'm sure SOMEONE has hacked it out, flufffed it away, or tweaked it enough to work for a different world.

Would anyone be willing to speak to their experience on this topic?
 

TheMouse

garmonbozia
Validated User
This is totally my MO. I'm like, Spirit of the Century? I think that should work for Exalted. Marvel Heroic RPG? Seems okay for Aberrant. Atomic Robo RPG? Hellboy!

I do it so much that it's my baseline. By now it's actually starting to feel a little weird whenever I run games with both the system and setting from the same book. I've just come to assume that I'm going to grab whatever system is handy for whatever setting that I want to run at the moment.

Not really sure what to say about it in particular. It works. It's fun. There's something of a skill to knowing that you need to change to make things fit, but that comes with some practice.
 

Craig Oxbrow

Ah, y'know. This guy.
Validated User
I'm sure I met someone once who doesn't do this.

As for 7th Sea I know someone who used it a regular Musketeer type game, but that's just scratching the serial numbers. IIRC he was thinking of using for Star Wars as well.
 

Alban

Registered User
Validated User
I was wondering if anyone has any experience using rules systems for settings other than the ones that are baked into the book? Some games (I was specifically thinking of 7th Sea) have their setting seemingly intrinsic to the rules but I'm sure SOMEONE has hacked it out, flufffed it away, or tweaked it enough to work for a different world.

Would anyone be willing to speak to their experience on this topic?
I do it very often.

In my view, game systems are tied to a genre, and not a setting. 7th Sea, for instance, would be a good match for any game focusing on adventure and swashbuckling, no matter what setting.

For instance, two very different games take place in Glorantha. RuneQuest is a gritty, simulationist game, and HeroQuest in narrative at core. Yet both have already been described as perfect match for the setting.

Different systems put different lights on settings.
 

DavetheLost

Registered User
Validated User
In high school we adapted Traveller for High Fantasy! As well post apocalypse, and a bunch of other stuff. We used it for everything.
Just made up new career tables, a few new skills, different equipment, and a magic system based on psionics.

And of course the whole d20/OGL thing is based on using D&D for other genres.
 

akajdrakeh

Pronounced 'akkadrakka'
RPGnet Member
Validated User
I've used WEG Star Wars to run a modern day techno thriller, high Tolkien fantasy, and a cycle of Norse-inspired fantasy.
 

Raygun-Goth

Registered User
Validated User
Used Deadlands: Hell on Earth to run Fallout. Didn't even have to change much of anything, Fallout has psykers and priests o' doom already.

I have used Call of Cthulhu (and hefty assistance from the Dreamlands book) to run D&D style dungeon mashing. Used Exalted for Robotech, and used L5R 4e for Star Wars.
 

Soylent Green

Polar Blues
Validated User
Back before there was a generic D6 version I did hack the Star Wars rules to for use with a post-apocalyptic game but it didn't work out too well. We just managed a couple of sessions of play before we moved on to something else.

Later I started running Gamma World. We had a lot of fun with that but I was entirely sold on the core system. Eventually I tried to convert Gamma World to Fudge which was OK but didn't feel like Gamma World. Ended up writing my own post-apocalyptic games, first with Fudge and later with Fate and they were just right, a the heroine from Goldilocks and the Three Bears might say.

I also recall in more recent times I trying to run Shadowrun using OcTane, a Forge-inspired game by the same author of Inspecters. It did not go well. I played with various ideas and in the wrote my one Cyberpunk game based on Fudge and again it was just right.

So I guess I have had better success with starting with the blank canvas of a generic system than mixing and matching dedicated systems and settings. I don't claim this is a universal law.
 
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