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Wargaming Campaigns - Maps

IceShadow

Painting Fiend
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I’m brainstorming up campaign rules for our Warmachine / Hordes group. One idea is a map campaign - but that needs a map. Does anyone have any suggestions on where to find large campaign maps?

I was thinking I would maybe draw my own, but my skills are limited, to say the least. Still, I seem to recall a game with map movement that had roads on longer, skinny areas, tougher terrain on smaller area spaces than open terrain, so that the same number of movement spaces moved you different distances, depending on the terrain. Does that ring a bell for anyone?
 

Thane of Fife

Registered User
Validated User
I’m brainstorming up campaign rules for our Warmachine / Hordes group. One idea is a map campaign - but that needs a map. Does anyone have any suggestions on where to find large campaign maps?

I was thinking I would maybe draw my own, but my skills are limited, to say the least. Still, I seem to recall a game with map movement that had roads on longer, skinny areas, tougher terrain on smaller area spaces than open terrain, so that the same number of movement spaces moved you different distances, depending on the terrain. Does that ring a bell for anyone?
I think that Games Workshop put out some maps for their... Generals' Compendium campaign rules that worked that way (long roads and small rough terrain).

Apart from that, wargames and RPGs can both be nice sources for maps. You can fight out your wars on a map of the Forgotten Realms or Normandy (or France or the Middle East or...).
 

Narcisista

Social Justice NPC
Validated User
Boardgames as well. Risk and it's variants, the Nentir Vale, Birthright had a never published boardgame whose map was released digitally, Westeros, and lots more.
 

Petter Wäss

I am agape with fnords
Validated User
There's some decent cartography software that's meant to be used to draw RPG maps, as well as the Cartographic Revision software which is meant to make maps for the Dominions 5 computer game but should work well for this too
 

Petter Wäss

I am agape with fnords
Validated User
This is an example of the sort of maps you get in Cartographic Revision. Decent variety of terrain with forests, swamps, wastelands, cities, water, and mountains. Comes split into provinces (which you could probably merge by just using paint to remove the border, if you want fewer provinces).
The flags are a bit annoying but could be neat to colour in the insignia of the various armies as provinces get taken.
pam.png
Seems like it would work well unless you want something more advanced
 

Petter Wäss

I am agape with fnords
Validated User
Otherwise you can just get any map you like the look at and draw in border (and maybe some roads) in paint
 

ChariotDriver

Registered User
Validated User
My suggestion would be to start with a google search for an outline map of some place your players aren't likely to recognise and draw some natural features, national boundaries, and place some major cities on it. Something like this as a starting point, although it doesn't have physical features yet:



Alternatively, Cartographer's Guild. They've got literally hundreds of campaign and other maps already made, so hopefully something there should grab your interest.
 

Aesthete

A for Aeffort
Validated User
Still, I seem to recall a game with map movement that had roads on longer, skinny areas, tougher terrain on smaller area spaces than open terrain, so that the same number of movement spaces moved you different distances, depending on the terrain. Does that ring a bell for anyone?
Sounds like the Border Princes Campaign Map:

Spoiler: Show



Here's the original version:
Spoiler: Show

 

Anopheles

I draw bugs
Validated User
For a Flames of War campaign the organizer made a map using aerial photographs of a section of Germany.

It was divided into a grid (20 x 26 I recall). Armies would move as counters each turn and if they encountered each other they used the map as a guide for the table for that week’s game; the 2 squares each army held and the 2 on each player’s sides, forming a 2x6 rectangle corresponding to the 4x6’ table.

Terrain was based on the actual terrain in the real photos, which both have some strategic value but also made the tables feel authentic. Often you get terrain on tables that don’t really make any sense or look too random.

During the campaign my army fought over the same area of the map twice (a train junction and major road). We used the same terrain set up for both games but added craters and battle damage to the buildings for the second battle.
 
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