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Warhammer Age of Sigmar - now with points values

VictorVonDoom

Hikikomori
Validated User
AoS's introduction was handled very badly, and Doom says that as a big fan of the game. But the changes since the new CEO got in charge have been tremendous and unprecedented. The introduction of starter kits for all armies at reasonable prices, GW's re-entry into the convention scene, their new openness on social media, the huge fan-driven FAQs, and this new Generals Compendium, which has been in the works for over seven months and involved bringing in independent tournament judges to review and playtest the point system. Whatever AoS's start, it is shaping up to be the best iteration of the game since third edition.

And yeah, the new setting is lame, but its no more tied to the gameplay than anyone playing D&D is forced to play in the Forgotten Realms.
 

Ascanius

Use the singular they!
Validated User
I don't have the budget for buying into Age of Sigmar, and the style of most of the fluff isn't really to my taste (not that previous editions were either), but they do have some beautiful models that I enjoy looking at in White Dwarf.

Spoiler: Show


I say I don't care for most of the fluff; I do find the Flesh-Eater Courts hilarious, because they're repulsive ghouls and ghasts and zombies who are all convinced that they're brave warriors defending human civilisation from evil in the service of a noble king . . . all while they're wielding the remnants of the last person they ate as a weapon, or strapping skeletons to their back instead of a heraldic banner.

I mean, these guys think they're knights in shining armour:

Spoiler: Show
 
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Samaritan

One of the good guys.
Validated User
For my part, I dig the look of Stormcast Eternals. Don't know why.

This... well, as I read more, might be enough to get me looking into a starter box.
 

VictorVonDoom

Hikikomori
Validated User
For my part, I dig the look of Stormcast Eternals. Don't know why.

This... well, as I read more, might be enough to get me looking into a starter box.
The new starter set coming out next week, featuring Stormcast Eternals vs Chaos, is only $33.
 

durecellrabbit

Registered User
Validated User
The new starter set coming out next week, featuring Stormcast Eternals vs Chaos, is only $33.
Just to add this is very much a low entry cost starter. You're not going to be able to do much with the amount of models that come in the box unless you just want a few to paint. The more expensive starter or buying the Stormcast half off ebay is a better bet for getting a beginner army.
 
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Praetorian

Go Rangers!
Validated User
Im excited. I am still a strong propnent of the narrative style AoS promotes, but the inclusion of points as an option is nothing but a good thing.

GW seems to be settling in to a better for-profit style than the abrasive process they have exhibited over the last few decades. Whoever is at the top injected a bit of rationality and pro-customer decisions needs to get an award or something.
 

Ascanius

Use the singular they!
Validated User
At least on Bolter and Chainsword, the man given all the credit is Kevin Rountree, who's worked for Games Workshop since 1998, starting out as assistant group accountant. He was head of sales for the Other Activities division (which included Black Library and licensing), then became chief financial officer in 2008, then became chief operations officer in 2011, and chief executive officer on 1 January 2015.

The theory goes that, despite being a "bean counter" by profession, Rountree understands the business because he's come up "through the ranks", by contrast to the previous CEO Tom Kirby who joined GW as general manager in 1986 and became CEO in a management buyout in 1991. He wasn't CEO for the entirety of the period since, but he was for most of it. Kirby's background was in game distribution before that, albeit only since 1980.

I've seen the theory explained as, basically, "the old guy thought the industry he started out in wasn't going to change and that therefore he already knew the right way to do things, and the new guy knew it already had changed and that GW needed to change as well."
 
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EthanSRDM

Ad-absurdum
Validated User
GW seems to be settling in to a better for-profit style than the abrasive process they have exhibited over the last few decades. Whoever is at the top injected a bit of rationality and pro-customer decisions needs to get an award or something.
As someone who dislikes Age of Sigmar, this is probably the thing that frustrates me the most about the whole situation. I've wanted Games Workshop to start doing stuff like this business wise for years now. And now that they're finally showing a change of attitude, they're doing it with a game, setting and visual aesthetic that I just can not get into.

*grumble*

This is a very frustrating state of affairs to try and move on from.
 

VictorVonDoom

Hikikomori
Validated User
Just to add this is very much a low entry cost starter. You're not going to be able to do much with the amount of models that come in the box unless you just want a few to paint. The more expensive starter or buying the Stormcast half off ebay is a better bet for getting a beginner army.
The nice thing about AoS is that it can be played at any level of miniatures (unlike say, 8th edition where it wasn't really suited to anything under 2000 pts and $500+ amount of minis). With a handful of miniatures, a person can play the game just fine, come up with fun narrative scenarios, and generally decide if they want to invest more into a certain army or try out a handful of minis of another army.
 

Scutarii

Registered User
Validated User
The nice thing about AoS is that it can be played at any level of miniatures (unlike say, 8th edition where it wasn't really suited to anything under 2000 pts and $500+ amount of minis). With a handful of miniatures, a person can play the game just fine, come up with fun narrative scenarios, and generally decide if they want to invest more into a certain army or try out a handful of minis of another army.
If the 'Path to Glory' style rules in the handbook are any good this could be the ideal process.
 
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