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[Wayfarers] Anyone checked this out yet.

HorusArisen

Lord of Misrule
Validated User
First became aware of this games existence when Mongoose was rebranding, anyone checked it out yet?

A bit busy with my Valhalla Falls and a possible Legend game to pick up yet but is it worth adding to my list of wants?
 

Elvish Lore

Hello!
Validated User
I flipped through it at the game store and gave it a 15 min skim.

It looked like a fantasy heartbreaker.

I put it back on the shelf.

Sorry, I don't have a more informed opinion for you here.
 

HorusArisen

Lord of Misrule
Validated User
I flipped through it at the game store and gave it a 15 min skim.

It looked like a fantasy heartbreaker.

I put it back on the shelf.

Sorry, I don't have a more informed opinion for you here.
I don't mind a heartbreaker as long as its a good one. I'm hoping to hear a bit more before I decide though I've got plenty in the pipeline so I don't need it if it's nothing special.
 

Ars Mysteriorum

Esoteric Scholar
Hello!

I've checked it out since back when it was a free PDF just starting to get art!

While I'm not aware of your unique tastes, I have found this game to be one that most accurately represents my memories of gaming from my childhood into my teen years, minus the quirky rules time kindly erased to ease the transition to nostalgia. I remember experimenting with classes, and this game makes that all quite easier by removing a class-based character generation and replacing it with a very simple usage of points to design your character using Disciplines (more combat oriented abilities) and Proficiencies (not expressly combat-related).

Character creation in Wayfarers is a streamlined experience, even in comparison to its earlier version. In the revised edition, the standard method uses a very simple application of twenty points to the five core attributes (the more traditional Wisdom and Charisma have been combined into a Presence score, to good effect in my opinion); no ratios or graduated cost of higher attributes (as in the previous version). Also, the number of Discipline and Proficiency points granted has been reduced (as well as the Disciplines and Proficiencies themselves) to further simplify the process.

Combat is extremely simple and serves as a fine platform for the your character's Disciplines to shine. No grid is required to describe the combat experience (though usage of a grid is easily abstracted, if you prefer). Likewise, outside of combat, Proficiencies shine with an especially elegant system. Rather than an ever increasing bonus to a certain skill (leaving others you neglect in the dust), Proficiencies are given Grades (or levels) that, rather than an infinitely increasing bonus, provide an additional d20 to your roll (to a max of 5d20). You add any relevant modifier from your attributes to your Proficiency tolls, and unlike D&D, this modifier will always feel impacting no matter what Skill Level your character attains. I think this sort of system allows the fun of playing low-level characters to carry over into higher levels, which only heightens the appeal for me.

The other factor to be taken into account is the rather brutal nature of the game. Combat is a risky situation where victory can never be guaranteed. Only characters with the highest endurance will have around 60 health points at level 10, where most will have health points around 35-45. Weapons and spells do greater damage than in traditional D&D, with the traditional baseline weaponry of daggers doing 1d6 damage, shortswords doing 1d8, and longswords doing 1d10 (there is a wonderful array of weaponry to choose from besides these, of course). Also, rather than Armor Class, there's a Dodge score, equal to your agility, and armor and shields, which reduce damage with a dice roll (the baselines: Leather absorbs 1 point, Chain mail absorbs 1d3 damage, Plate 1d6, and full plate 1d8; naturally with far more options to choose from). Wearing armor without appropriate strength and training via the Armor Use Discipline can reduce your Dodge, Initiative, and movement rate.

There are also four kinds of magic rather than the traditional two, with Hermetic appearing as the traditional wizard's repertoire and Faith the priest's that go up to eight levels (or Circles in Wayfarers parlance). Hedge magic is not unlike the Illusionist specialization on steroids with entirely unique spells that suit the images of the gnome Illusionist, the bard, or less traditionally the Renaissance alchemist and early scientists. Ritual magic is where things get a bit different with the use of spell points of four different types that are combined and spent to cast certain spells that are, again, quite unique and suit the images of a tribal shaman, a druid, a witch, or a follower of a deity or entity that ambiguous in morality. To say that the latter two forms of magic are lesser versions of the two former would be a disservice, as they all include drastically different spells (with some meshing of spells between Hermetic and Hedge magic; none at all between Faith and Ritual).

The GM guide features a compendium of magical items and detailed instructions of their creation, an enormous collection of monsters both traditional (though usually through an interesting lens) and wholly unique to Wayfarers, a section on the simplified process of creating NPCs, detailed aid in refereeing combat and proficiencies that actually truly do go a ways to helping the GM run the game more fluidly. The section on initiative even kindly features a list of the disciplines and other few factors that modify a character's initiative. There is some helpful redundancy as well to provide less flipping between sections and keep the GM in the game rather than skipping about in his books. Both books feature helpful tables (wonderfully expanded with name lists for NPCs, towns, bars, and features in dungeons in the GM guide to help flesh out the game) to help keep the focus on the game rather than the books.

I am immensely pleased with this game, as it features the best parts of nostalgic gaming and manages to take that idea and apply it to the entirety of the experience. Most other old school renaissance games tend to be a repackaging of D&D, but this is a true revision of the classic where the careful attention to the scaling of the game is what makes it glow with the magic of our cherished (and exaggerated) memories. I strongly suggest you give it a look!

Ye Olde Gaming Companye has kindly placed a sample of the player's guide for your perusal, located here.

I hope you enjoy!
 
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Machpants

ExF3Nav
Validated User
I have only fully read the older version and it looks pretty good. Trial combat played fast and furious. I have the new dead tree versions in my to read pile, brought on the strength of the old system PDF. Certainly check it out as a DnD-a-like, it maybe just your thing like Ars!
 

jeremywolf81

Registered User
Validated User
I have to admit I put it on the "don't bother" list, personally, when the ad copy I saw for it gushed about the vast arrays of skills and spells and so on it has. That usually screams out-of-date (design-wise) fantasy heartbreaker to me.
 

Captain Deadpool

I'm an assassi... Horse Trainer
Validated User
Before everybody got in an uproar (rather recently) about "cloning AD&D 2E", I found Wayfarers to be a "spiritual successor" to AD&D2E.
 

Captain Deadpool

I'm an assassi... Horse Trainer
Validated User
Really other than a bit of heaviness, my only real complaint with the Wayfarers system was that it was trivially easy to be a MAGE-Fighter type, but almost impossible to be a FIGHTER-Mage type (as in predominantly the first type and just dabbling in the second, as Magic was ridiculously expensive per the chargen rules but most fighting abilities were fairly cheap).

It's been a year or two, so I don't remember anything more specific than that.
 
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