Wayfarers vs C&C

Sinmaan

Registered User
Validated User
I am looking for a Fantasy system and 4E/Pathfinder don't suit my need. I need something less "combat/encounter" oriented and much less rule heavy. I don't want to waste an evening working on a single NPC.

This said, Castle and Crusades and Wayfarers are in my sight for good options for a light fantasy game with good old time feel.

Anyone played both and willing to share their experience?



Thanks for the wisdom sharing!
 

Red Jester

Retired User
Sorry for not providing an answer, but I was going to ask more or less the same question. For what it's worth, I've heard very good things about Wayfarer.
 

Rob

Registered User
Validated User
They're both simple systems whereas C&C is more of a boiled down 3.5 that feels a lot like a cleaner ans more accessible AD&D1 and Wayfarers is different. Wayfarers is also simple to get into but has several innovations like a proficiency system, reflavors spells and adds many to the mix. Both are good but of the two I would recommend Wayfarers for coolness. C&C is much better supported though, with tons of adventures and support material, if that is a factor for you.

Btw, My favorite simple old-school system is "Adventurer Conqueror King" and I urge you to check out some reviews.
 

markkat

J. T. Swill III
Validated User
I am looking for a Fantasy system and 4E/Pathfinder don't suit my need. I need something less "combat/encounter" oriented and much less rule heavy. I don't want to waste an evening working on a single NPC.

This said, Castle and Crusades and Wayfarers are in my sight for good options for a light fantasy game with good old time feel.

Anyone played both and willing to share their experience?



Thanks for the wisdom sharing!
Hey Sinmaan, I'm biased, but I'd suggest downloading our preview PDF to get an overview of things.

You can also find a free download of our intro module: Trouble at Niven's Creek here. There are example characters and creatures, and I believe you can probably run some practice combats without spending anything.

I am currently adding some material to TANC, btw. So it will be replaced with an updated version soon.
 

Melire

Retired User
In Wayfarers you have a lot more to track. Thats because you list your "Disciplines", which are your skills. You also have skill points, pre requisites and other details to keep track of. So I wouldn't consider it as "simple" as C&C just on that alone. You also have to remember to take into account whatever damage armor may absorb, and other things. So you really need to look at it and decide if you like what is there.

Now if you want a simplified game that revolves around a D20 roll for nearly everything, plus makes it easy to use any monsters you want from Pathfinder/3E/4E, then you may want to seriously consider C&C. Thats what first attracted me to it. I owned a ton of stuff from 3E back to Basic D&D, especially adventures. I wanted to be able to use all of them without any more work than necessary. Thats why I went with C&C, so simple to convert 3E and 4E monsters on the fly. I literally look at their HD, which tells me their base attack bonus, then I look at attributes, scale them to C&C by taking some points off, figure out what those modifier, and jot down final totals. I then look at skills, feats, and powers, and if I want to keep them I treat any skill as if it has a "Prime attribute" associated with it, add in modifiers from any thing else I want to keep, and I am done. Unless its a really complex monster you can probably keep track of all of it in your head.

Using your 3E/4E materials with Wayfarers isn't going to be nearly so easy.

So as far as which is simpler? C&C fits my definition far better, plus its far easier to make it "compatible" with any other D&D materials you want to use. Then again, Wayfarers may have everything you want a system to have in it, and find all the conversion notes to be worth the time and effort.

So its really best if you give both a try, but since it sounds like your trying to save yourself some money, I guess that really isn't an option. If simplicity is your main thing, then C&C is it. If a bit of added complexity like what I have noted may appeal to you, then go with Wayfarer.
 

timbannock

Formerly 'neuronphaser'
RPGnet Member
Validated User
So its really best if you give both a try, but since it sounds like your trying to save yourself some money, I guess that really isn't an option. If simplicity is your main thing, then C&C is it. If a bit of added complexity like what I have noted may appeal to you, then go with Wayfarer.
This, plus the fact that C&C has a gajillion good, simple, and well-written house rules and conversion notes already published across just about every messageboard. C&C is better "supported" by the mere fact that it can utilize anything OD&D, 1e and 2e era with almost no conversion, plus all the 3e and later things are dead simple to drop in as long as you consider the consequences.

Wayfarer may be better if you're not looking for ANY baggage -- i.e. you don't own or have access to D&D materials. That's an important point, because perceptions may skew as soon as the D&D name becomes involved.
 

Red Jester

Retired User
Hey Sinmaan, I'm biased, but I'd suggest downloading our preview PDF to get an overview of things.

You can also find a free download of our intro module: Trouble at Niven's Creek here. There are example characters and creatures, and I believe you can probably run some practice combats without spending anything.

I am currently adding some material to TANC, btw. So it will be replaced with an updated version soon.
Totally awesome. Never expected one of the guys who wrote the damn thing to reply to a post about their game, and so quickly too! But I'm new to the forums so what do I know :p Thanks for the info guys.
 
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The Disgruntled Poet

Registered User
Validated User
I'm finishing up a 2+ year C&C campaign and I can vouch for the system being very light. In a C&C game, very easy to focus on the story, action, characters and narrative vs. the mechanics. Not only is it light, this makes it easy to houserule, so if you don't like something, add what you like or change what you like. You can review some C&C threads here to see all sorts of rules mods people have made to suit their tastes.

The only drawback is that within the same class, characters are very "samey"-- i.e., mechanically similar (at least, with no houserules). So mechanics people don't care for that sometimes. Honestly, my players' characters are so very different, that it doesn't feel like an issue that they are similar, but we have also avoided having more than one character of the same class for the most part. (And there are at least 8-9 classes? So not hard to do) Anyway, good players make their characters stand out by virtue of their actions, roleplay, histories, quirks, so that hasn't bothered me much yet.

(Like most RPGs, the trick is having good players to start with! I'm lucky that way.:) )

So I guess that's my plug for C&C. Wayfarers may be awesome too, never played it.
 

Golden Age Superhero

Registered User
Validated User
Never played Wayfarers but I love C&C. I got burned out on 3.5 D&D and found C&C to be a lot of fun and easy to GM and play. I can run a campaign with nothing but a Monster and Treasure book and the 1st edition D&D DMG random encounter charts. There are a lot of free stuff online with optional rules and extra stuff.
 
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