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đź’€ Necro Western the RPG

capnzapp

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Yes. (I hesitate to add "obviously", but you really can't do the English language justice if you don't speak it at near-native levels, which, the the best of my knowledge, the Gillbrings don't)

However, I can answer the implied follow-up "so why isn't it finished then?" ;) with: because it's their baby for over thirty years, so I would be surprised if they're not heavily involved in the details. And that's assuming the translation isn't done already, which it probably is. In which case the hold-up doesn't have to do with the translators at all...

(Again, should we have to wait another year, that would honestly not shock me. This is likely the wrong project to kickstart if you require timely results. That said, I wish the Gillbrings the best of luck in their difficult situation, and I obviously hope the release day is soon :) )
 

Merlock

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Hello there...

I’m sorry if this is highjacking the thread, but do you know where I could find some “Classic Western” scenarios on the net?

By “Classic” I mean:
  • No blatant supernatural (but hidden magic is fine).
  • Set somewhere between 1865 and 1890.
  • I would favor a style closer from “John Wayne’s Westerns” (i.e. “Rio Bravo”, Rio Lobo” or “El Dorado”), than “Spaghetti Westerns”, but this is not mandatory.
  • I don’t care about stereotypes; I think they are part of the genre.

Thanks a lot.
 

tomas

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You can find a number of Boot Hill modules available on DriveThruRPG as both PDFs and PODs.
 

Cessna

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I’m sorry if this is highjacking the thread, but do you know where I could find some “Classic Western” scenarios on the net?

Take any other story and swap in different props.

No, really - "Western" is an immensely flexible genre. You can take pretty much anything and shoehorn it into a Western with proper use of horses and six-guns.
 

AndersGabrielsson

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On Ken & Robin Ken likes to say that D&D a typical D&D setting is basically the Wild West with other trappings, so many D&D adventures that aren't too dungeon-focused (or that have dungeons that can be translated to abandoned mines or the like) should work.
 

capnzapp

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Take any other story and swap in different props.

No, really - "Western" is an immensely flexible genre. You can take pretty much anything and shoehorn it into a Western with proper use of horses and six-guns.
If you're like me though, you're very sensitive to those genre and setting specific trappings. To me a good adventure is steeped in the world it is set into.

That's why I have a hard time using D&D scenarios for a Warhammer FRP campaign for instance. While nominally both fantasy games with scenarios where you do pretty much the same thing, something's just... off with the idea to use one for the other (and believe me, I've tried).

In D&D you're expected, encouraged and enabled to go forth and slay monsters basically just for the joy of it (the module might mumble something about rewards and gratitude but that's pretty much it). And I love to play D&D, don't get me wrong.

But when GMing WFRP I can't use 99% of D&D modules. You're supposed to have a much more personal and compelling reason to adventure in WFRP (at least imc), and the entire game is written around the opposite assumptions of D&D: that you're just the wrong schmuck in the wrong place, you don't have the proper tools for the job (such as levels, hundreds of Wounds, and magic swords), and people will generally not appreciate your work anyway (and might even run you out of town or burn you at the stake for ridding their town of chaos and corruption...)

Sorry for the aside; just wanted to present an alternative take saying that I have tried, and failed, to use non-Western material for my Western game (including D&D but also other Old West material, mainly since most American games of the genre are happy to switch it up with monsters and zombies). Western RPG on the other hand shines when you read a lovingly crafted scenario meticulously researched, based on purely historic events.

In a way, Western RPG is the Call of Cthulhu of wild west games. (That's meant as high praise)
 

Merlock

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Take any other story and swap in different props.

No, really - "Western" is an immensely flexible genre. You can take pretty much anything and shoehorn it into a Western with proper use of horses and six-guns.
That’s… so TRUE, indeed !

Plus, as noted by AndersGabrielsson, any D&D adventures that aren't too dungeon-focused are usable. I would add that EVEN dungeon-focused adventures are playable in Western style.

How that ? Well replace your “classic” Dwarf-abandoned mine/stronghold by a cursed and abandoned gold mine where miners have digged way too far and unleashed a Balro… err! an Ancient Amerindian Evil Spirit (optionally cthulhian) and voilà!

Run you fool gunslingers!!

That being said, I’m French, hence lucky enough to have access to a number of French-Belgian comic books with virtually ready-to play scenario.

I guess you know about Lucky Luke or Blueberry, but have you ever heard of Jim Cutlass adventures ?

This comic started in 1979 as a standalone story, and continued by Jean Giraud (aka Moebius) and Christian Rossi (drawing), from 1991 to 1999, with a total of seven books. The pitch is:

“After the Civil War, Jim Cutlass a former North army officer, but born in New Orleans inherits a cotton plantation. Being anti-slavery, he finds himself fighting against the Ku Klux Klan. But he will also have to deal with other (black) extremists, led by a mysterious Voodoo priest named "the White Alligator", and determined to eliminate the whites from Louisiana, by using voodoo magic and zombies...”

Real magic and real zombies, of course…


Well... guess what? I think I have my campaign synopsis, after all…

Western RPG on the other hand shines when you read a lovingly crafted scenario meticulously researched, based on purely historic events.

In a way, Western RPG is the Call of Cthulhu of wild west games. (That's meant as high praise)
Fair enough…

It must be kept in mind that “Western”, as a genre, is both Myth and History, but when the Myth becomes fact, one prints the Myth...

So… what to do exactly?

My opinion is that a meticulously researched scenario, based on purely historic events takes the risk of being a rather “flat” History course. Even the most interesting course is still a course, no a story.

But RPG players want to live and make a story they do not want to be watchers of History’s events. That’s what I call “the three Musketeers paradox”; the closer Alexandre Dumas characters stick to History, the less interesting become their adventures…

The same goes for Western. For example: How interesting is a Western story focused on Lincoln assassination if the PCs have no chance of preventing it, because History is already written? But if they succeed in doing so, the GM will have to deal with an alternate history setting… which is a big stuff to manage.

So, as says capnzapp, a good Western story must (or at least can) be lovingly crafted with purely historic events.

I agree with that.

I also think that actual historical events make very good story plots.

However, I think that those same historic events must be a starting point, not an end.

For example, the PCs cannot prevent Custer’s death at Little Big Horn, and no story should be based on that premise. But what if this same Custer, a few minutes before being killed, orders the PCs to carry a message to the rest of the Army telling them not to follow the previous instructions, because of the risk of being trapped like Custer’s army and annihilated?

Then, the PCs will have to flee the battlefield, cross the Indian territory and deliver the message to the Cavalry headquarter. They will be chased by enemy warriors and have to rely on wit and tricks to escape. Even if they succeed, they face the risk of being charged as deserters… This may even lead to a “secondary quest”: what if the PCs are captured and lead to the indian leaders, just to discover in their camp that a deserter from Custer’s forces betrayed his plans to the enemy, leading him to his doom? What will the PCs do?

All this won’t change History, but is firmly set in purely historic events and gives the root of a personal journey for the PCs.
 
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capnzapp

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The scenarios written by the Western authors are more based on them reading about now-forgotten but engaging historical events, and then crafting a fictitious story around that place, event or personage.

It really fixes the adventures in a specific era and mindset that simply cannot be replicated by, say, grabbing any old D&D adventure and reskinning orcs to be bandits... It makes adventures ooze authenticity and period detail - again, things utterly devoid in a ported scenario.

It can be anything, but the point is that it is specific and detailed (as opposed to generic, replacable and clichéd): Women spies during the Civil War. The spiritual society of Santa Fé. About the leader of Chinatown in Tucson. Concerning the Coal and Iron Police of Pennsylvania...

Sure you could reskin a scenario for a different scenario, meticulously adding in period detail.

But mostly I don't expect more out of a conversion than just another generic bank robbery, or showdown with indians, or whatever, where you can almost see the orcs or hobgoblins or whatever behind their human bandit masks...

If you want more, I expect it to be easier to just start from scratch.
 

baakyocalder

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Beta 2.0 version of book 1 was made available to Kickstarter backers. I haven't looked at it enough to see if there are any significant differences.
 
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