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[WFRP3e] What do we know?

Balbinus

Repairer of Reputations
Untrue.

They are going to appear in a later supplement.
One of my concerns with this edition, is it's adopting the supplement treadmill approach with a vengeance. Halflings in a later supplement, rat catchers in a later (possibly the same one as the halflings though) supplement.

I'm getting a distinct gotta catch'em all vibe, which is not a trend in gaming I like and one I had hoped we were heading a bit away from again after the fairly dismal sequence of such games a decade or so ago.

Is it too much to ask that rpgs should be released fully playable, without stuff that people will obviously want being held back for later releases so as to encourage the buying habit? WFRP 1e managed, most indie games manage without any supplements at all, I think this will be a fun game but I hate the subscription model being applied to gaming.
 

Erifnogard

Skyfall Ranger
Validated User
Ok, some highlights from the seminar at Gen Conn. Not too detailed as I'm posting from my phone.

One: there is nothing stopping you from running any size group you want from the core box. The Adventure Pack adds some additional career cards and some spare dice but the core comes with around 30 career cards as it is. Sure you might not have the nifty storage box for more than 3 characters, but just use an envelope or note what cards you need to pull next time. Additionally you could just transfer the info from the cards to your character sheet.

Two: they are doing some really cool stuff with the cards, they're not just there for the heck of it. The cards actually get rid of the need for a lot of the charts. For example when you take a wound you pull a wound card and place it face down in front of you. If at some point you are critted, just flip your top wound card over and there is the crit. Insanity is also handled like this with an Insanity deck.

Three: The party has a character sheet! Their is a fortune pool for the party and a party tension tracker that has some fatigue effects as party tension ratchets up in play. This stress is added based purely on the GMs observation of the party's roleplaying. Also characters can tag some of their abilities to the party for the benefit of all.

Four: every character has a "Stance" track with a conservative side and a reckless side to it that affects all their abilities and spells that they use based on which side of the track they are currently choosing to be on (and yes you can change which stance you are in often - usually every round). Different careers have different amounts of conservative vs reckless on their track and how far out on on one side or the other you currently are will have a greater affect on how things work out. It should be noted that all abilities and all spells have both a conservative and an aggressive version which have their own bnefits and drawbacks and they are handily summarized on opposite sides of their cards.

Five: The dice are integral to the whole system. You have dice for your ability. You swap some of those out for dice that represent your aggressive or conservative stance. Instead of modifiers for circumstances or tactics you add fortune or misfortune dice. There are a few other types that account for some other factors. Making the dice pools is going to be incredibly easy as you form your initial pool by reading right off the character sheet and the fortune/misfortune dice are given out by the gm as he
describes the circumstances and you describe what you are doing and any tactics.

Six: This is not either a board game or a miniature game and does not require either a map or miniatures any more than current WFRP does.

Seven: The reason the careers are on cards is so that as more careers are added you just slip them in the career deck and have them all in one place rather than scattered over multiple books and supplements. Ditto for ability cards and spell cards.

Eight: Character generation - first you choose your race, then you draw three career cards and choose one. Or if you want to play hardcore you draw only one career and suck it up. Or (if you are a hippy, tree hugging elf - my words not theirs) you could just choose a career. Careers function very much like now with advances and skills. If you choose to leave your career without 'completing' it (i.e. take a certain number of your advances and skills) then you don't keep your career's special bonus. If you do complete your career you keep the special from your career. For the ratcatcher this would be the small but vicious dog (who apparently has his own abilities and is essentially your little, and vicious, minion). Note that you can still choose to buy skills not in your current career for a premium with gm approval.

I'll add more if I can remember it.
 
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Odie

If only she could breathe
Validated User
We know that I normally don't care a whit for fantasy settings, but the new system's approach (custom dice? cards? cool!) has actually got me interested in trying WFRP for the first time.

-B
 

Erifnogard

Skyfall Ranger
Validated User
One of my concerns with this edition, is it's adopting the supplement treadmill approach with a vengeance. Halflings in a later supplement, rat catchers in a later (possibly the same one as the halflings though) supplement.
I can't speak to when the halflings might be out, but the rat catcher is in the Adventure pack along with ~10 other careers and will be available at launch according to the guys giving the seminar.
 

generalzod

Insert Witty Comment Here
We know that I normally don't care a whit for fantasy settings, but the new system's approach (custom dice? cards? cool!) has actually got me interested in trying WFRP for the first time.

-B
Haha. Make that two of us!

I'm following this with quite a bit of interest. My big question right now is: how fluid will the game system be to run? Savage Worlds taught me the value in useful "doo-dads" as part of a game system, but it also taught me that the system getting out of my way so I can focus on the story and character interactions is a chief need I have when running a game.
 

Old Scratch

Registered User
Validated User
One of my concerns with this edition, is it's adopting the supplement treadmill approach with a vengeance. Halflings in a later supplement, rat catchers in a later (possibly the same one as the halflings though) supplement.
And this didn't happen in the last edition? The career compendium that is used to sum up all the different careers from 15 different supplements.

Most games do this. This could be a concern for most mainstream released games.

WFRP 1e managed, most indie games manage without any supplements at all, I think this will be a fun game but I hate the subscription model being applied to gaming.
No, WFRP did not manage. You'll note the references in the corebook to the forthcoming Realm of Chaos and Realm of Sorcery supplements. That many of the gods, even ones like Sigmar weren't detailed much and you had to wait for additional products.
 

Erifnogard

Skyfall Ranger
Validated User
I went into the seminar a bit leary as I had heard the 'they've changed it into a boardgame' statement a few times and I was totally not interested in that. But I found that the more accurate statement is that they took their experience with board game components and thought of some really cool ways to enhance the roleplay experience.


Oh, something I forgot in the earlier summary post, Wardancer career for the wood elves will be in the Adventure Pack as well.
 
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