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What about the Lankhmar books by Fritz Leiber?

Marcantony

Registered User
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Since Im asking about books what about Leiber's stuff?

If it helps I have enjoyed all the Conan novels including the early ones by Howard.
 

Coyote's Own

Former ACME QA Tester.
RPGnet Member
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They're a fun and enjoyable read.
They generally feel less "serious" then Conan.
The story if Issek of the Jug actally had laughed out loud.
 

Litpho

Wandering stranger
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The first five are some of the best Sword & Sorcery ever written. The last two have their moments, but are far below the standard Leiber had set for himself.
 

Pieta

Very custom
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Reading Leiber spoiled Pratchett for me, since I've realized a lot of what I liked in Pratchett came straight from Leiber. Dude had some seriously great ideas.
 

Nagaresu

New member
They're a fun and enjoyable read.
They generally feel less "serious" then Conan.
The story if Issek of the Jug actally had laughed out loud.
That Story is perhaps my favorite one. The Lankhmar stories a fun read and the Audible versions are good as well with Johnathan Davis doing an amazing job on them (With introductions by Neil Gaiman who likes the books as well). Swords and Deviltry was my first step into audio-books and I quickly tore thru the whole series driving to and from work.
 

ESkemp

Registered User
Validated User
The first five are some of the best Sword & Sorcery ever written. The last two have their moments, but are far below the standard Leiber had set for himself.
That's basically what I would have written. You're still going to see some "writer from a previous generation has some problematic assumptions" here and there, but Leiber's better than many of his peers in several ways. Leiber frequently had something to say about human nature, like the dumb-yet-arguably-unavoidable machismo of becoming obsessed with a challenge, and he'd frequently use satire to make that point. And he also liked breaking the formula: the duo have great chemistry and banter together, but some of the magnificent stories happen when they split the party (often for the silliest reasons).

Plus, fun worldbuilding. There's about a sentence in "Claws from the Night" that talks about Lankhmar fashion, and it's the sort of detail that more fantasy/fantasy RPG authors should strive for.
 
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