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What do I need to know about D&D 5e?

Manitou

Emperor of the Americas
Validated User
Oh, geez. Am I going to have to ban stealth at my table?! o_O
No, I think Hituro is AFAICT using an overly complicated interpretation of the rules to nerf stealth[which is a valid thing for a DM to do, just to be clear, not a knock on Hituro]. I would however, just go by what's in the book at first, as I think that simpler to handle.

Ie, a rogue wants to hide in combat, just have them make a stealth role and explain how they are somehow hiding. Compare to the passive perception to se fi they succeeded. If they succeed(which the player doesn't technically know) you can let them ad sneak attack damage when they make their attack. If they don't, then they don't get to.

Unrelated to the topic of stealth: how important is alignment in 5e? I know that alignment is one of the core aspects of D&D, but I've never liked it. The idea of absolute morality and "always evil orcs" is just weird to me. Is it possible to if not strip it out completely than at least minimize its presence in the game?
Not too important. it's stayed where 4e had it. Which is, IMO, not too important. You might see "always evil" written somewhere, but orcs entry, I don't think, actually says that. And you can play an orc too!{their stats suck compared to the half orc so I would just play an half Orc, maybe ask the GM to let me say i am a full orc if that matter}.
 
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Manitou

Emperor of the Americas
Validated User
So you have them roll, record the results, wait for them to run into something while sneaking, and then see if the majority of rolls beat its Passive Perception? I guess that works.
Well, if it's a guard or a hunter or can otherwise said to be "on the lookout" for some reason, then you could use an active perception roll I think.
But it's meant to be simple.

Since the OP is fairly new to the system I would keep it simple to start with.
 

WistfulD

Registered User
Validated User
Unrelated to the topic of stealth: how important is alignment in 5e? I know that alignment is one of the core aspects of D&D, but I've never liked it. The idea of absolute morality and "always evil orcs" is just weird to me. Is it possible to if not strip it out completely than at least minimize its presence in the game?
Most importantly, outside of demons/celestials, alignment is purely descriptive, not proscriptive.
 

StreetBushido

Registered User
Validated User
I'm glad that alignment isn't that important. To me it's always felt like a built-in excuse for a player to go "But that's what my character would do!". Thankfully my players are a bit more mature, than that but still. It's nice to not have to deal with that hassle.
 

Kid Twist

Registered User
Validated User
One thing I'd think about when starting is what level you want to start at. My impression is that the levels 1-3 are training levels to help new players adjust to the game slowly, so you don't actually get a class "kit" until 2nd or 3rd level. If you have an experienced group who is comfortable with D&D and some of the options, even if you're not familiar with 5e, you might just want to jump ahead to 3rd level and get on with the cool stuff.
 

StreetBushido

Registered User
Validated User
One thing I'd think about when starting is what level you want to start at. My impression is that the levels 1-3 are training levels to help new players adjust to the game slowly, so you don't actually get a class "kit" until 2nd or 3rd level. If you have an experienced group who is comfortable with D&D and some of the options, even if you're not familiar with 5e, you might just want to jump ahead to 3rd level and get on with the cool stuff.
I appreciate the advice. For some members of my group I think a start at a higher level could work, but for others it would not. When the time comes I'll take it slow and start things at 1st level.
 

Epicurean DM

Registered User
Validated User
No, I think Hituro is AFAICT using an overly complicated interpretation of the rules to nerf stealth[which is a valid thing for a DM to do, just to be clear, not a knock on Hituro]. I would however, just go by what's in the book at first, as I think that simpler to handle.

Ie, a rogue wants to hide in combat, just have them make a stealth role and explain how they are somehow hiding. Compare to the passive perception to se fi they succeeded. If they succeed(which the player doesn't technically know) you can let them ad sneak attack damage when they make their attack. If they don't, then they don't get to.
Agreed. To follow Hituro's too-strict reading of the rules heavily discourages Rogues from sneaking around during combat, which feels unfair to me. If you follow my summary, the Rogue's ability to hide in combat is balanced by requiring an action to Hide before gaining the benefits. That's one round where the Rogue can't attack, so it seems like a fair trade-off.

My summary is a good explanation of the RAW Stealth rules and simply chooses to favor the Rogue in a gray area of the rules (Stealth in combat).
 

amethal

Registered User
Validated User
My summary is a good explanation of the RAW Stealth rules and simply chooses to favor the Rogue in a gray area of the rules (Stealth in combat).
I agree it is a good explanation, as it allows Hituro - and myself, as it happens - to follow along and identify the exact point where we disagree with this interpretation of the RAW.

However, I don't think there is anything wrong with a generous interpretation of the Stealth rules - it won't usually break the game if you give the rogue a chance to shine, and if you explain things to the players at the start I don't think they will object if you reserve the right to rein things in later if necessary. The skill rules in 5th edition are pretty much left to the DM to figure out anyway, so run it in a way which suits your group.
 

MacBalance

Registered User
Validated User
If you follow my summary, the Rogue's ability to hide in combat is balanced by requiring an action to Hide before gaining the benefits. That's one round where the Rogue can't attack, so it seems like a fair trade-off.
Something important to consider for Stealth is it is not required for Sneak Attacks. By default, you can also be eligible by attacking someone a friend is attacking, so your thief is incentive to gang up on enemies and maybe (if you care) kill-steal a bit.

Most Archetypes for thieves add new ways to get Sneak Attack, too.
 

Manitou

Emperor of the Americas
Validated User
I was just about to post to say that, M MacBalance !
People sometimes discuss rogues hiding as though that's the only way they get sneak attack. It is important to remember they can get it for helping a melee attacker take down a foe.
The OP will want to remind this rogue's players of that.
 
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