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What Games Should Ditch Their House Systems

Jonathan Tweet

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Paranoia - in all its editions. I've always thought it strange that a game that is supposed to be a humorous, crazy ride in a zany setting should have detailed mechanics and skill systems that do just the opposite. It needs a featherweight system that incorporates glorious failure. FU would be a perfect fit I reckon. Or even Toon, just add crit failures.
Good call. Paranoia was ahead of its time, but not all of it was ahead of its time.
 

DavetheLost

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Earthdawn was one of the first games to have fluid classes. As someone who avoided 2nd Edition D&D like the plague, it felt nothing like it; no THAC0, no race-as-class, no straightjacket-every-member-of-this-class-is-the-same material.
Race as Class began with Holmes (basic) D&D, not 0D&D as many people think, and continued through the B/X ad BECMI families of D&D. The various character kits added with 2nd edition AD&D did a lot to add variety to members of the same class, before that they were pretty cookie cutter. The differences being weapon proficiencies and spells known.
 

Litpho

Wandering stranger
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I wonder if one could adapt the Chuubo's quest system to meet Ars Magica needs? With research a major focus of the quests.
One thing I like about the crunchiness of the current system is that a Maga has the option to gamble (Spell close to her limit with a d10 die which may or may not be enough) or she can study some more to make the casting a sure thing (in regular circumstances). You don't really get those incentives with a less granular game for all of the other virtues it may have.
 

Chris Tavares

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Race as Class began with Holmes (basic) D&D, not 0D&D as many people think, and continued through the B/X ad BECMI families of D&D. The various character kits added with 2nd edition AD&D did a lot to add variety to members of the same class, before that they were pretty cookie cutter. The differences being weapon proficiencies and spells known.
Holmes Basic, the original blue book, did NOT have race as class. That originally showed up in Moldvay Basic (the red book).
 

thenorm42

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One thing I like about the crunchiness of the current system is that a Maga has the option to gamble (Spell close to her limit with a d10 die which may or may not be enough) or she can study some more to make the casting a sure thing (in regular circumstances). You don't really get those incentives with a less granular game for all of the other virtues it may have.
Yeah, it'd be a very different game, Chuubo's is completely diceless so there's no element of randomness. But I think it could work, it'd just be focused on the narrative, and perhaps more on the day to day aspects of research and conclave life.
 

Alban

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Stars Without Numbers.
The use of different dice in different situations, and the whole OSR vibe of it is just unbearable to me.
 

Ghola

Veteran of 100k psychic wars
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I would rather that Green Ronin dumped AGE or published systemless versions of their settings. AGE has nothing to offer me that I couldn't get from any other system.
 

Kuildeous

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The last time I ran Ars Magica (at a con), it was free-form.
I could totally see that. While I like the crunch of Ars Magica, I could see where some players could let it get in the way of the story. The story could certainly be fluid enough to run it with a rules-lite system.

In fact, the one time I played Ars Magica was at a con, and it was a terrible experience. My wife now views the game with suspicion. The GM knew his stuff, it seems, but he focused on the minutiae of the coven for a 4-hour convention slot where most of the players didn't know the rules. He was probably a great GM for a home game, but his session fell flat in a convention where getting a bunch of potential newbies mired in the rules is certain death. Running it freeform for a convention sounds like a great idea. Probably a true statement for most nonmainstream games out there.

I see the point about Paranoia not needing rules, but it's worth noting that not all Paranoia games are reduced down to hilarious backstabbing and wacky hijinks. It can also be run semi-serious with sardonic undertones. I ran a mini-campaign using Masterbook one time, and it worked pretty well. But freeform certainly works for Paranoia.
 

Ficino

Rascally Rabbit
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Paranoia - in all its editions. I've always thought it strange that a game that is supposed to be a humorous, crazy ride in a zany setting should have detailed mechanics and skill systems that do just the opposite.
I always thought that was part of the joke. Just as things in the setting are more-or-less the opposite of what they are officially said to be.
 
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