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What IS it about Traveller?

Spinachcat

Registered User
Validated User
#1
UKPete said:
Yesterday, through the magic that is Ebay, I received a copy of Deluxe Traveller.

I shouldn't love the game so much. I'm having to re-write most of the system in order to just play the thing. But on unwrapping it yesterday, I couldn't help but tell it that I was its Daddy now, and welcoming it home.
What IS it about Traveller?

I completely and utterly understand what UKPete is feeling. Every time I pick up my little black Traveller books, there is this feeling of possibility. I know several Traveller fans from conventions and there is this fan-atical devotion to this game.

Are you a little black book devotee? What inspires us so?
 

gloomhound

Registered User
Validated User
#3
A sea of stars, a ship to sail among them. When Traveller was written was a dark time and unlike a lot of the media of the time this was a game of a hopeful future. Traveller is a game of possibilities.
 

WalkingDead

Gaming Curmudgeon
Validated User
#4
I've never even played Traveller and I seem drawn to it. I've got copies of the first three of the old black books, and I've skimmed through them. I don't know what it is, but it just looks so cool. :)

Chris
 

Gary N. Mengle

Antithesis of Weal
#5
Classic Traveller is, in many respects, the ultimate toolbox. You can amuse yourself for weeks just making stuff. See also Doc Rotwang's recent thread about the joys of randomly creating stuff.

Classic Traveller was unique in its day for its classy, elegant minimalist presentation. It's still unique in that respect, though a few have tried to copy it. (I also think that CT's type of minimalist presentation would not work well with a standard-sized book.)

CT holds up remarkably well for a game it's age. Even out of the box, it's pretty playable. It's certainly nowhere near the mess that D&D at the time, and it predated Runequest.
 

RippedShirtKirk

Telepathological
Validated User
#6
gloomhound said:
A sea of stars, a ship to sail among them. When Traveller was written was a dark time and unlike a lot of the media of the time this was a game of a hopeful future. Traveller is a game of possibilities.
Traveller was always optimistic in tone, and it provided such a broad canvas on which to paint.

Oh, and Fusion Guns.
 

Samaritan

One of the good guys.
Validated User
#7
I wonder... did anyone ever do a chargen program for Traveller?

As to the OP question... I'm not sure I could honestly answer it. Traveller is like... well, it's like being given the reins over a hard scifi movie and an unlimited budget. Possiblities, like Gary said.

(EDIT: For what it's worth, I got my intro via the Megatraveller boxed set, then Traveller: The New Era. I got the free PDF of the re-release of Traveller... 4th edition, I think?... from Drivethru RPG some months ago.)
 
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Ian Absentia

Angry gigantopithecine
#8
Spinachcat said:
Are you a little black book devotee? What inspires us so?
Yes. It's the lack of art (with the exception of the portrait of Jamison) and the lack of setting. The original three LBBs are a carte blanche, possibly one of the best-executed game formats ever -- just enough of a framework to support almost any Sci-Fi fantasy you've ever had, but almost nothing to get in your way.

!i!
 

Dropkicker

Part Time Dilettante
Validated User
#9
Dare I say it, CT has a certain elegence to it. World and animal buidling interlocks with trade which dovetails with ship design. It's also unencumbered by background requirements which makes the possibilities for its use wide open.
 

Mithras

5859B7 Age 48 7 Terms
Validated User
#10
Yes, yes, the freedom to go where-ever you wanted and try whatever you wanted. That's how we played it, and I think that's how you were supposed to play it.
 
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