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What is the appeal of Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay?

Numanoid

#rocksteadyrollhard
Validated User
One other thing careers offer (and something the 4E added some system mechanics around) is your position within society I.e. social class. This is something a “fighter” in OSR doesn’t really include.
Right. In the OSR with its “zero to hero (or at least greater zero” aesthetic, it’s assumed you position in society at level 1 is “not great.”

I can see the appeal of incorporating more varied social classes among PCs. I remember from the early WH books that your initial career was randomly rolled; is this still true in later editions? And with a variety of social classes, how do you in-game arrange it that a noble, a merchant, and a latrine-digger all spending time together and having adventures?
 
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Shining Dragon

Tough Tiger Fist
Validated User
Right. In the OSR with its “zero to hero (or at least greater zero” aesthetic, it’s assumed you position in society at level 1 is “not great.”

I can see the appeal of incorporating more varied social classes among PCs. I remember from the early WH books that your initial career was randomly rolled; is this still true in later editions? And with a variety of social classes, how do you in-game arrange it that a noble, a merchant, and a latrine-digger all spending time together and having adventures?
Yes, randomly rolling your career and attributes is still there. If you choose to accept the initial roll for each, you get some XP, if not you can roll again for less XP, and then choose with no XP as a last option (race is just roll and get xp, or choose).

And like all rpgs, you can always revert to the “... you all meet in an inn...” reason for adventuring together. That is, it’s a problem every game has to deal with when people create characters and come up with varied backgrounds.
 

GRAAK

Registered User
Validated User
To me these are the main reasons:

- a non D&D fantasy game more grounded in realism and in the "everyday" atmosphere
- a society filled with conflicts and bigotry you must deal with (this adds to the more realistic feel wfrp gives me)
- I don't know if everyone agrees, but wfrp gives to me more roleplay than rollplay feel
- careers: you can have a holy knight banded together a student and a fisherman. And I wouldn't bet the knight will be the one that survives in the end!
- the call of cthulhu vibe, more or less emergent
- The quite narrow focus: empire, with rare dwarves and halflings. No, you can't play the power rangers from ulthuan. To me this is a good factor, ymmv, I can understand someone feels it detracts from the gameplay.
 

Shan Andy

One man and his giraffe
Validated User
For me, and this is going back over 20 years,

WFRP was very clearly British and it spoke to me. It revelled in the blackly comic, gallows humour of everything being broken but, if you can get to the end of the day with a shilling for a pint then everything is fine. Until tomorrow morning. It was silly history as written by people who understood it. It was early renaissance rather than medieval, set in a definitely-not-early-renaissance-Europe.

D&D was shiny heroes doing dangerous things for loot and advancement. WFRP was people like me doing dangerous things because...actually, how did we end up doing this? I'm respectable, you know.
 

Sirharrok

Registered User
Validated User
I remember reading an introductory scenario in White Dwarf (involving an inn?) and being hooked on its evocative setting.
 

Ven

Registered User
Validated User
For me, and this is going back over 20 years,

WFRP was very clearly British and it spoke to me. It revelled in the blackly comic, gallows humour of everything being broken but, if you can get to the end of the day with a shilling for a pint then everything is fine. Until tomorrow morning. It was silly history as written by people who understood it. It was early renaissance rather than medieval, set in a definitely-not-early-renaissance-Europe.

D&D was shiny heroes doing dangerous things for loot and advancement. WFRP was people like me doing dangerous things because...actually, how did we end up doing this? I'm respectable, you know.
This.
Plus I ran WFRP in the '80s. Some of the very best (& longlived) gaming anecdotes my main group fondly retells are from The Enemy Within campaign (enlarged with many White Dwarf scenarios). The elf prosecuted in Middenheim when his penchant for putting hanging baskets on the front of their rented house got out of hand. The image of the ladder emerging from the outhouse in the backyard... and emerging... and emerging... like something from a cartoon (after pulling off the back of the outhouse and capturing 2 of the bad guys when they took a dump). "Tuppence to get in, a shilling to get out" of Nuln. Escaping in a handmade submarine. Using, though inevitably they broke fast, a variant on da Vinci's hang gliders. The pride they have in retelling the sole time in 40 years that a plan entirely worked.

It was Cthulhu in the 17th century with added humour for contrast & silly puns for the GM to enjoy in the text.
 
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Ven

Registered User
Validated User
I remember reading an introductory scenario in White Dwarf (involving an inn?) and being hooked on its evocative setting.
A Rough Night at the Three Feathers.
I ran that thrice (with variations) till finally they noticed what I was doing :) .
 

Burgonet

Retired user
Validated User
I am yet to run the game but I suspect a lot of the appeal is rooted in the 'it's not really history but it feels historic'.

A lot of D&D worlds simply do not feel real; they instead feel like artifices that exist solely for there to be dungeons with treasure.
Warhammer's setting feels like a real place primarily as it cribs heavily from a real and historic influence.

It's a change to be part of a setting rather than be a murder hobo asking why their world's walls are made of cardboard.
This isn't a dig at D&D - but the 'town' is really there as a service centre for goods and services to facilitate the dungeon.
Most computer and console games tend to epitomise this.
Now there's nothing wrong with this approach especially IF your game's focus is on the Dungeon as a location.

I don't think you don't have to have a 'grim dark' setting for a setting to feel real, to feel like a place.
It just has to have that sense of place.

The Empire, Reikland in particular has a strong sense of place.
And it's that which, I believe, sets it apart from your generic D&D world.
 
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Hammel

Registered User
Validated User
Which books of the latest WHFRP series give a good background about the world? How much background material is in the core book?
 
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