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What was the 'failed promise' of early Traveller?

Strange Visitor

Grumpy Grognard
Validated User
Not really - most things that slow down the fleeing side will slow the pursuing side just as much, and being slowed first doesn't really make a difference.
Sure it does. If you hit a barrier that stops you from doing a full move and have to go around it, it lets the people chasing you catch up with a partial move and still strike. They'd have to stop at it too, but it doesn't matter because they got to hit you after doing it.

But yeah, it doesn't actually enable you to escape unless you have some kind of strong point to retreat towards or environment that you can navigate better than they can. I did write as much.
Must have misread what you were saying then.

Yeah, there are certainly a lot of things in the monster manual that humanoids (especially armored ones or short-legged types) can't run away from, at least without magical help. Sometimes also boasting super senses and innate ranged attacks just to make it even better.
Its one of those cases where I sometimes wonder if people who talk about retreating being a useful option mostly had D&D characters who fought other humanoids (where the 12 or more move situation was less common).
 

Ulzgoroth

Mad Scientist
Validated User
Sure it does. If you hit a barrier that stops you from doing a full move and have to go around it, it lets the people chasing you catch up with a partial move and still strike. They'd have to stop at it too, but it doesn't matter because they got to hit you after doing it.
Not really how obstructing terrain works, though. It's either impassable (so moving around it is compulsory, but that's fine unless you've accidentally run into a wall) or it's partial and costs an extra space or two of movement. That's not enough to let the pursuer get a clear shot unless maybe you hit the breakpoints just wrong and they have reach.

I'd be more worried about hitting a lack of obstructive terrain. If you can't put something in the way each round, you can get hit with a charge.
 

3rd Level Fighter

...has a cunning plan...
RPGnet Member
Validated User
You don't have to retreat faster than the monster...you just have to retreat faster than the slowest hireling...
 

Strange Visitor

Grumpy Grognard
Validated User
Not really how obstructing terrain works, though. It's either impassable (so moving around it is compulsory, but that's fine unless you've accidentally run into a wall) or it's partial and costs an extra space or two of movement. That's not enough to let the pursuer get a clear shot unless maybe you hit the breakpoints just wrong and they have reach.

I'd be more worried about hitting a lack of obstructive terrain. If you can't put something in the way each round, you can get hit with a charge.

I'm thinking of things like hitting a closed door or a wall so you have to take off at a right angle.

And, well, having a real lack of terrain to work with his a general problem for running away; it also maximizes any ranged attack capability on the part of pursuers.
 

3rd Level Fighter

...has a cunning plan...
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Many monsters had animal intelligence, which I took to mean they would only be hostile if:

a) they were attacked first;
b) they were hungry, or;
c) their young was threatened.

It's an easy matter to stab a hireling, if your party is that way inclined
 

Anfelas

Registered User
Validated User
Battle dress plus grav belt is faster. Plus you can drop a few smart mines or a drone wave or two to cover your retreat. Or call in an orbital meson strike.
If you are Zhodani you can always teleport from harms way...
 

Ulzgoroth

Mad Scientist
Validated User
I'm thinking of things like hitting a closed door or a wall so you have to take off at a right angle.
...So what? You're already starting each turn in contact with the pursuer. The only way that could possibly make a difference is if you suddenly became aware of the wall in middle of your turn. Or if your problem is that there were multiple parallel pursuers and you're forced to run into the strike area of one of the flankers.
 

Strange Visitor

Grumpy Grognard
Validated User
Many monsters had animal intelligence, which I took to mean they would only be hostile if:

a) they were attacked first;
b) they were hungry, or;
c) their young was threatened.

It's an easy matter to stab a hireling, if your party is that way inclined
Even with animal level intelligence, if you've got multiples not all of them are going to sit and bother with a single when there's still prey to chase down. And of course, some are simply malevolent. Animals have more range of behavior than people give them credit for (canids, for example, will chase you goddam long time sometimes once they've decided they're annoyed with you).
 

Strange Visitor

Grumpy Grognard
Validated User
...So what? You're already starting each turn in contact with the pursuer. The only way that could possibly make a difference is if you suddenly became aware of the wall in middle of your turn. Or if your problem is that there were multiple parallel pursuers and you're forced to run into the strike area of one of the flankers.
Do I really have to explain the advantage of being able to move diagonally as compared to doing two right angles? And when you're in full flight is exactly the time when you're likely to realize you have a problem in the middle of a move.
 
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