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When systems crash and burn: funny examples

David J Prokopetz

Social Justice Henchman
RPGnet Member
Validated User
We're talking about Dark Heresy, so the pistol in question where either lass or bolters.
That doesn't preclude the pistols in question being so badly designed and shoddily maintained that their accuracy is about on par with black powder weapons. In fact, being as it's Dark Heresy, it virtually guarantees it. :D
 

Trond

New member
Banned
A pace is two strides. Your average male stride (since it's typically men dueling) is about 2.5 feet. 20 paces is thus about 100 feet. If you mean that both participants took 20 paces, that's 200 feet apart.

Most people aren't terribly accurate with a pistol at that distance, especially with the ones used at the time most dueling took place. It is my understanding that the 20 paces thing was chosen because you can't hit the broad side of a barn with period pistols at that distance, so people could duel without everyone getting killed.
A little error there. If a pace is 2.5 feet then 20 paces is 50 feet, and the final distance 100 feet. This sounds about right to me.
 

Whitewings

New member
Banned
The first edition version of Exalted included a Charm for Abyssals that allowed them to immediately attack a second target if they killed their current one, so long as the second target was within a fairly short distance. It also included a Charm that allowed you to gain back motes (magical power) whenever you injured something, so long as your weapon was made of the correct material. The entire player base realized almost instantly that these two Charms could be used together, quite legally, with a weapon of the correct material, to kill entire armies' worth of regular troops, even good, well-equipped troops, in a single action, and have more motes at the end that they had at the start. "Then did the Ender of All War raise up the Bringer of Final Peace against the armies of the nations which were gathered against him. And they were not."
 

David J Prokopetz

Social Justice Henchman
RPGnet Member
Validated User
A little error there. If a pace is 2.5 feet then 20 paces is 50 feet, and the final distance 100 feet. This sounds about right to me.
You misread him. A stride is 2.5 feet. A pace is two strides.

The first edition version of Exalted included a Charm for Abyssals that allowed them to immediately attack a second target if they killed their current one, so long as the second target was within a fairly short distance. It also included a Charm that allowed you to gain back motes (magical power) whenever you injured something, so long as your weapon was made of the correct material. The entire player base realized almost instantly that these two Charms could be used together, quite legally, with a weapon of the correct material, to kill entire armies' worth of regular troops, even good, well-equipped troops, in a single action, and have more motes at the end that they had at the start. "Then did the Ender of All War raise up the Bringer of Final Peace against the armies of the nations which were gathered against him. And they were not."
To be fair, that one's totally intentional. In the second edition, that Charm is revised so that it operates within the mass combat framework, and it explicitly can make whole armies (well, small armies) go splat.
 

not a pumpkin

Registered User
Validated User
They were using normal DH Las Pistols, which can shoot for 200 feet before getting penalties, and I think I recall him complaining more about the fact that he was taking head shots, and hitting multiple times, and they guy was still standing (because head shots don't make a difference in DH untill you start doing critical damage.)

At least that's what I remember, as soon as I realised he was complaining about how they were running unmodified combat rules, which are meant to represent a skirmish, and then complaining badly they represented a formal duel with both parties standing in place, I tuned out fairly quick.
 
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Marius B

Euro-Trash
Validated User
In HERO (at least in 1-5), bigger creatures are more likely to survice long falls than smaller ones. An elephant that falls ten stories is unlikely to even be stunned, while a cat will almost certainly be splattered.

In Twilight 2000* 2e, an average character shot in the face with a .45 has only a 1/6 chance of suffering a "Serious" wound - assuming the attacker rolled an Outstanding Success. If not, there will be a 1/6 chance that the wound will be "Slight" - otherwise it'll be merely a "Scratch". The average number of times you'll have to shoot this guy in the face with a .45 to kill him is 6. If you shoot him in the chest instead, you'll be lucky to even get his attention...

*You know, that gritty, realistic post-apocalypse game from GDW. ;)

But chickens not having a monster manual entry doesn't matter - use the one for 'generic bird'. Seriously, just because something doesn't have an official statblock doesn't mean you can't fight it for XP. Granted, if one of my players tried to pull that trick, I'd whap them with a notebook and tell them 'this is why I don't use the XP system'.

And when you reach the level where 'generic bird' no longer gives XP? Switch to oxen, or go adventuring.
Except you're still ignoring the bit where you're not actually fighting a foe. You're mindlessly slaughtering tame, domesticated animals that aren't fighting back and are probably mainly trying to escape. The XP for monsters in 3.x is explicitly for defeating them, not necessarily killing them. You're not defeating the chickens that were never a threat to you or anyone in the first place. So you get XP for traps (which you can't kill since they're not alive) and for outsmarting or routing a monster but none for slitting the throat of a little old lady or, say, a chicken.

Basically, your example is an effect of the rules as very selectively read.
 

Whitewings

New member
Banned
I forgot the really ridiculous part: At the end of the slaughter, the Abyssal will have moved, in a single turn, a distance limited only by the number of targets available. In theory, he could go from one side of a city to the other in a matter of seconds, if the streets are busy enough.
 
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