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Which 5e DMs are switching to P2, and why?

Shalabi

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I'm not switching per se (I intend to run both, just as I ran PF1e and 5e games concurrently), but I love the simplification it brings to the game. The new monster stat blocks are 1000% better than the multi page mishmash in 1st. I love that they have been decoupled from PC creation rules. Everything you need to know is right there on the page.

I also like the new rarity system, and moving away from the assumption that PCs can just purchase any item that has ever been printed just by walking into a store.
 

fjw70

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I'm not switching per se (I intend to run both, just as I ran PF1e and 5e games concurrently), but I love the simplification it brings to the game. The new monster stat blocks are 1000% better than the multi page mishmash in 1st. I love that they have been decoupled from PC creation rules. Everything you need to know is right there on the page.

I also like the new rarity system, and moving away from the assumption that PCs can just purchase any item that has ever been printed just by walking into a store.
But why do you not just switch to 5e strictly? Is there something you like about P2 that 5e doesn’t give you? Or is the group just dedicated to Pathfinder.
 

Alter_Boy

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These are points that might have been true for PF1 as well, but I'll restate them.

1) The specificity of rules. For many common and/or important interactions, the rulebook has a rule to adjudicate that. The GM is always in charge of their game, and can amend the rules. However, there is a benefit in learning the rules so that you can play with new people and have a shared understanding of how interactions are resolved.
From my experience with 3ed/PF1, that approach wasn't helpful because those specific rules often resulted in weird or unfun results. So far, the comprehensive rules feel like they are in the benefit of the game Paizo is trying to produce.

2) An abundance of high-quality professional adventures. Paizo has always been good at providing adventures for their system on a monthly basis (or even more often) that are as high quality as what other companies take months to release. From my experience, if you played the Adventure Paths religiously and without breaks, you might be able to just keep pace with their release schedule. For the majority of people, you'll have a whole campaign ready for you, and in a year or two, you'll have options of which adventure path you would like to use with your group.

And judging from their previews, the PF2 Adventure Paths will be going all the way to level 20, cramming in much more content than the old ones (probably because the higher-level monster stats aren't as unwieldly as they were in PF1).

https://paizo.com/store/pathfinder/adventures/adventurePath/ageOfAshes
 

Shalabi

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But why do you not just switch to 5e strictly? Is there something you like about P2 that 5e doesn’t give you? Or is the group just dedicated to Pathfinder.
The level of customization and options in 5e is faaaaaar to low for my tastes. Everything starts to feel samey after the while. On the flip side, PF1e has waaaay too many options, and game play tends to devolve into an optimization metagame that leaves the roleplay behind. I think 2e is a great balancing point between these two extremes.

Of the campaigns I am currently running, I use 5e for the one with my family (Wife, and 2 children ages 6 and 8), and PF1 for the one with my wife and adult friends. Once the current 1e campaign wraps up in a couple months we will be switching to 2e and not looking back. I'm also debating switching my 5e game to Pugmire, but I'm afraid it might be a bit complex for the kids.
 

fjw70

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The level of customization and options in 5e is faaaaaar to low for my tastes. Everything starts to feel samey after the while. On the flip side, PF1e has waaaay too many options, and game play tends to devolve into an optimization metagame that leaves the roleplay behind. I think 2e is a great balancing point between these two extremes.

Of the campaigns I am currently running, I use 5e for the one with my family (Wife, and 2 children ages 6 and 8), and PF1 for the one with my wife and adult friends. Once the current 1e campaign wraps up in a couple months we will be switching to 2e and not looking back. I'm also debating switching my 5e game to Pugmire, but I'm afraid it might be a bit complex for the kids.
When you say more options and 5e feeling samey, do you mean for PCs? Or are you taking about on the DM side too. What DM options are there built into P2?

Also, I want to think everyone for their responses. I am just trying to understand the P2 appeal from the DM side of the table.
 

DocShoveller

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I was already running PF1 from time to time, switching to PF 2 isn't any major hardship. I will continue to use 5e for what it is good at, and give PF 2 a fair try for what *it* seems to be good at.
 

Lesp

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I'm not switching exactly, but I do plan to run it to see what it's like. While there's nothing that specifically stands out as a thing that I'm super glad is in there, it's maybe the most impressed I've been with a d20 system on sight-reading in quite some time, maybe ever, just in terms of general organization and internal consistency. It's definitely not my platonic idea of what I think D&D should look like in the 21st century, but it's as close as any published product I've seen.
 

Protean

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I would not consider myself a 5e DM although it is one of the games I run. For me when I'm running 5th Edition I feel like I'm largely on my own. The game does not really provide me with meaningful tools to judge DCs or consequences. I feel like I am constantly shepherding the game. Tools like the DC by Level chart with the adjustment table, encounter building guidelines, and skill uses with defined consequences should help me run the game in a fashion where I can exercise GM judgement where it is needed, but otherwise step back and see what happens. It is also helpful that the game spells out its underlying expectations for things like PC wealth and magic items so I can know how far I am from baseline.

I am also really happy to see changes to the magic system which should help to maintain an air of drama in charged situations even when a wizard is involved. I also applaud how the rituals are written to encourage players to interact with the game world when they want to utilize plot device level magic. I'm also a fan of how the rarity system allows me to award powerful spells and items as treasure instead of something that is just expected.

Finally I'm excited about the action economy and the impact it has had on monster design. It looks like these creatures will be fun to play.
 

randomgamer8466

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Has PF2 eliminated the ever-stacking giant modifiers issue that seems to be the legacy of all 3e’s descendants? I picked up a book and returned it when I saw that trait. I know a lot of people love pathfinder but 5e has spoiled me on a nice streamlined system that doesn’t require you to do much micro-math before each roll. If PF2 has gone a similar route, I’ll play it.
 
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