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Which adventures best show off Glorantha?

ffilz

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honestly, I find most of the adventures that are published never actually stated when they took place, and give the fuzzy time line is and can be what with heroquesting mucking about when and how things went down, run your adventures when you want them to occur. Esspecially in light of how Greg wanted Runequest to essentially be run kind of like Pendragon, and how Argath may or may not had been one person. Remember Your Glorantha May Vary and time is the great compromise.
That's true and that's the thoughts that allow me to use anything I feel like using. There may be a few things that aren't usable because of how much they differ from my idea of Glorantha (which has evolved to have more Lunar presence than my early play which was mostly Apple Lane, Snake Pipe Hollow, and White Dwarf adventures to my later play that includes Pavis, Big Rubble, and Borderlands).

Of course since I do play with a Lunar presence in Pavis, it's easier to adapt almost anything. If it's from a non-Lunar time, it's easy enough to add Lunars if necessary, or just run it as an area without enough interest from the Lunars to have a presence.

Frank
 

g33k

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honestly, I find most of the adventures that are published never actually stated when they took place...
But given the Lunar dominance in Sartar and Prax in the RQ2/RQ3 eras, and the LACK thereof in RQG, there's a substantive shift in background/context.

Adaptations can be made, but the issue does exist, to be adapted-to! Many folk dislike the whole notion of RPG metaplots, for reasons such as this.
 

ffilz

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But given the Lunar dominance in Sartar and Prax in the RQ2/RQ3 eras, and the LACK thereof in RQG, there's a substantive shift in background/context.

Adaptations can be made, but the issue does exist, to be adapted-to! Many folk dislike the whole notion of RPG metaplots, for reasons such as this.
Yea, I'm fine with a Lunar occupation, but setting in a different era for a new edition or new products takes it from an initial situation to meta-plot.

For a while I had come to the conclusion that the way I liked my published settings best was when they were no longer being published for. Unfortunately, for every setting that I am remotely interested in, that is actually no longer true... And that has actually been part of the fuel for my return to the first or at least earlier editions of games. I can take the setting as published at that time as my gold standard, and incorporate newer material if it fits an is interesting to me. And it's a philosophy that's easy on the wallet. No more "buy everything to complete the setting" (a philosophy that ironically was inspired by the fact that I had missed some of the later RQ2 Gloranthan products... Thankfully I have now filled in all those holes, most of them filled with a lucky eBay find in 2005 but the last few holes filled in thanks to the Classic RuneQuest Kickstarter). I've sold most of my Hero Wars/Hero Quest era material.

Frank
 

videopete

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Here is the thing about Glorantha and the fuzzy time line. There are events that are already mentioned that have not happened yet in the game, but will, as they have already happened as they were spelled out in the Saga of Argrath as mentioned in the Prince of Sartar. Argrath, after Kellyrn Starbrow attempts the light bringers quest she dies on the hero plane. Then when argath returns to relight the fires of Boldhome and goes on his light bringers quest and resurrects Shen Seleris (very bad idea) who murders the Emperor, and turns the lunar empire into the Empire of Monsters, before Argrath tears teh moon from the sky. As Runequest is a game of mythology none of the events are acutally fixed as they are in fact a retelling and attempt of reconstruction centureis later after the publication of the Zin Letters. Runequest and Glorantha is funny as the more you learn the less certain of facts you become, which is a feature of the setting not a flaw.
 

Bren at RPG Net

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Runequest and Glorantha is funny as the more you learn the less certain of facts you become, which is a feature of the setting not a flaw.
It's an intended aspect of the setting. Whether that intentional uncertainty should be considered beneficial or a flaw in an RPG setting is as subjective as is all of Gloranthan history and mythology.
 

GreenTongue

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Play King of Dragon Pass on PC or IOS. It's not only the most tangible way to see "how Glorantha works", but also comes with dozens of adventures easily portable to the table.
This is true and will give a very good feel for Glorantha.
 

g33k

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Yea, I'm fine with a Lunar occupation, but setting in a different era for a new edition or new products takes it from an initial situation to meta-plot.

For a while I had come to the conclusion that the way I liked my published settings best was when they were no longer being published for. Unfortunately, for every setting that I am remotely interested in, that is actually no longer true... And that has actually been part of the fuel for my return to the first or at least earlier editions of games. I can take the setting as published at that time as my gold standard, and incorporate newer material if it fits an is interesting to me. And it's a philosophy that's easy on the wallet. No more "buy everything to complete the setting" (a philosophy that ironically was inspired by the fact that I had missed some of the later RQ2 Gloranthan products... Thankfully I have now filled in all those holes, most of them filled with a lucky eBay find in 2005 but the last few holes filled in thanks to the Classic RuneQuest Kickstarter). I've sold most of my Hero Wars/Hero Quest era material.

Frank
I just adore Glorantha, frankly. But it kind of is a classic example of the problem with vast & deep game-lore worlds... They can be soooo intimidating and impenetrable. Yes, I /do/ know the "classic" solutions, "start small" & "grow PC info as you grow player info" &c...

But mostly, these days, I prefer a game with a substantially-real-world basis. Modern Urban Fantasy, historical fantasy, near-term sci-fi based on reasonable extrapolations of existing socio/political/economic trends, etc. Even a game like Eclipse Phase -- which arguably fits that "reasonable extrapolations" clause, modulo the TITANS & Exurgent Virus -- suffers from "too rich" a setting.

The problem with those deep/rich/vast/broad settings is getting sufficient player buy-in that the GM doesn't have to go into mind-numbing infodump mode, just to give the player enough awareness to make meaningful, sensible choices in character-creation. Then moving on, role-playing when the players don't grok the setting, and keep being grossly ignorant, through no fault of their own besides not having time to read hundreds of pages of source material... Really, I find those real-world-based settings -- with cultural referents that make sense to most/all of the players -- to be where I am most willing to look into a new game.

But I adore Glorantha, having first played it almost 40 (egad!) years ago... So it's not a "new" game, right? I keep telling myself that... Having a hard time formulating "not a 'new' game" for my players, who've never played it... ☺
 

ffilz

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Here is the thing about Glorantha and the fuzzy time line. There are events that are already mentioned that have not happened yet in the game, but will, as they have already happened as they were spelled out in the Saga of Argrath as mentioned in the Prince of Sartar. Argrath, after Kellyrn Starbrow attempts the light bringers quest she dies on the hero plane. Then when argath returns to relight the fires of Boldhome and goes on his light bringers quest and resurrects Shen Seleris (very bad idea) who murders the Emperor, and turns the lunar empire into the Empire of Monsters, before Argrath tears teh moon from the sky. As Runequest is a game of mythology none of the events are acutally fixed as they are in fact a retelling and attempt of reconstruction centureis later after the publication of the Zin Letters. Runequest and Glorantha is funny as the more you learn the less certain of facts you become, which is a feature of the setting not a flaw.
That may be the Glorantha of many folks, and maybe it's almost a logical conclusion of hero questing, but actually, in my RQ gaming, there has never been any hero questing, the game really works fine without it. So all that kind of fuzzy stuff you just mentioned? None of that is part of MY Glorantha. I've read bits and bobs of it, but honestly, I've really not gotten much into the fiction.

I don't know how much of a problem different GMs conceptions of Glorantha based on the subset of the material they have absorbed is for the players of those games. I've certainly played with folks who had previous Glorantha experience (even with some players who probably had deeper knowledge than me) and it has never been a problem (the players with deeper knowledge may have asked me a few questions about MY Glorantha, and I asked them about some things, and in one session they even called up someone with EVEN MORE knowledge to see if we could get an answer) so maybe it's not something to worry about.

Frank
 

Smiorgan the Bald

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That may be the Glorantha of many folks, and maybe it's almost a logical conclusion of hero questing, [...] So all that kind of fuzzy stuff you just mentioned? None of that is part of MY Glorantha.
Well, heroquesting or not, most of the mythos and history of Glorantha is morally ambiguous. Who was the good guy: Arkat or Nysalor? Who were the main bad guys of the Second Age? God Learners or Wyrm Friends? Or the beinighted traditionalists who opposed both? Are the Trolls evil? Is the Lunar Empire evil? Isn't Argrath just a new Arkat, a destroyer, bringing about the violent end of an age?

All this moral grey is evident from the external perspective, but sure can be ignored if you choose a perspective in play. If you play Orlanthi Joe defending his farmstead and family, then Lunar tax collectors, irate Trolls, roaming Broos, destitute exiles and outlaws from a neighbouring clan are all bad guys. No issues about that.
 
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