Worst. Modules. Ever.

Raveled

Hail Tzeentch!
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This is why I always try to find a way to adapt the community rules from Underground! to any sort of modern campaign that has any social concerns at all. It's pretty much the only rule set I've seen that explicitly lays out how a PC group can alter their community.
Fractal Rule, fam. Give a community aspects like Run Down Tenements and Encroaching Urban Blight, skills like Scavenge and Predation, challenge the PCs to change those. Or to lean into them and become lords of the under-city!
 

Gogmagog

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IIRC, this was part of what shaped the rather angry tone of Listen Up, You Primitive Screwheads! People were just not seeing the full range of possibilities in the genre.
That was the one that encouraged GMs to steal the PCs' stuff, run Humvees into their safehouses and mock them if they can't take the heat? "Go back to that game with the elves and gnomes!"
 

BMonroe

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What is it for? Well modules like Sister of Sorrow! It's a module for Trail of Cthulhu that takes place on a U-boat in WW1 and most of it is... being on a U-boat in WW1. There's scenes about fixing batteries while ankle-deep in salt water, Stability tests when there's weird knocking on the hull, tension between the crew when it turns out there's a thief on board, and the like. It does a great job of getting it through your head that working on U-boats sucked big-time. And then Deep Ones invade the sub and kill everyone because they're angry that these machines are going underwater, because that's where they live!

Yeah, the knocking on the hull is from the Deep Ones messing with the crew, but it really feels like a random "And then monsters!" after an entire module that is just setting up tension and atmosphere.
This is one of the great problems with CoC, and why I eventually stopped playing any of the *of Cthulhu type games. There are legions of great adventures for CoC, but then every once in a while there's these lame scenarios about, I dunno, shipping manifests and shit (BtMoM, I'm looking at you). ToC I gather has fewer of them, but there still seems to be this weird tendency for Cthulhu games to degenerate into historical sims first, with the horror bits as an afterthought.

The tendency of the games to devolve into banal historical simulations was tiresome. Even back in the 90s I finally gave up on running games in anything but the modern world as we ended up with too many historical tangents (I remember an entire session of Masks of Nyarlathotep getting side tracked as we tried to figure out how difficult it would be to place a long-distance call in the 1920s, and if pencils were a commonplace thing at the time).

It was actually one of the thoughts behind the Blood Brothers books. To move away from the core of CoC scenarios at the time, and come up with all kinds of crazy stuff. Forget trying to simulate a specific era. Forget trying to be historically accurate. Just make a good horror scenario that can be played in one evening, with some actual horror stuff in it, and have fun with it.
 

Gogmagog

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Blood Brothers. Loved the pulp jungle adventure and the 12 Little Indians scenario. The Dawn of the Dead ones were...too much like movies and set endings.
 

BMonroe

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Blood Brothers. Loved the pulp jungle adventure and the 12 Little Indians scenario. The Dawn of the Dead ones were...too much like movies and set endings.
Fair enough. I wrote themto be just like the zombie movies I loved, but YMMV and different strokes, and all that.
 

Wakshaani

Cheesey Goodness
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I think we're getting seriously off-topic for this thread. I'm all into a thread about "what is cyberpunk and what is a cyberpunk RPG" but this isn't it.
If you want to spin off another thread, let me know! I'm, OBVIOUSLY, all about this discussion. :D
 

Gogmagog

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Fair enough. I wrote themto be just like the zombie movies I loved, but YMMV and different strokes, and all that.
Oh! Well more exactly, having the PCs play through DotD scenarios I found keen with both Night and Dawn style adventures. The endings were rather abrupt with 'Suddenly zombies!" dog piling the characters and sudden equipment failure letting the zombies in, Perhaps the Walking Dead style scenarios where the PCs can in fact make a (somewhat) more secure area and begin to rebuild wasn't something that was really tapped into back then
 

Kremlin KOA

Sarcastic Cripple
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Thread drift? On RPG.net?!?
Your winnings.

This is one of my most despised tropes in modules. Even if everything else is golden, the idea "even if the PC's fails, NPCs/Fate will intervene to solve the problem." Nothing ruins a game faster, for me, than having ones failures mean nothing. It's one thing to have your SUCCESSES mean nothing--that's a solid if grim take on the world. But FAILURE should mean something.
Well, in a defense of the module. If you succeed you have a chance of rescuing the remorseful scientist.
If you fail he dies destroying the bioweapon.
 

BMonroe

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Oh! Well more exactly, having the PCs play through DotD scenarios I found keen with both Night and Dawn style adventures. The endings were rather abrupt with 'Suddenly zombies!" dog piling the characters and sudden equipment failure letting the zombies in, Perhaps the Walking Dead style scenarios where the PCs can in fact make a (somewhat) more secure area and begin to rebuild wasn't something that was really tapped into back then
Right. Back when those were written, nobody (to my knowledge, please correct me if I'm wrong) had done any sort of long-term stories with zombies.

I was basing them on the Romeroverse movies, which showed a progression of the world, if not necessarily the same characters from film to film. But they were very much intentionally written to be: "Hey, this is a weird situation, let's make the best of it and DAMMIT ZOMBIES!"

If I'd written those scenarios today, I would probably have them be a little more nuanced, a little more focused on long-term goals (see my book for AFMBE "One of the Living" for examples). But when I was 20, and the only person I knew who loved zombie movies, I just had fun with them. "Zombies come; everybody dies."
 
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