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Worst. Modules. Ever.

Gogmagog

Registered User
Validated User
D&D never really tried to sell "animating the dead is evil" as a moral principle - they just stated it. By Heroes of Horror, I think they just gave up, admitting that a focused necromancer can be perfectly good otherwise, but their powers are still evil because shut up, and their familiar summoning was still linked to the Lower Planes because they got warlocks and necromancers mixed up again.

Speaking of undead, Crucible of God from the Gehenna book for VTM doesn't even try to be subtle about its denial of player agency.



The game tells the ST to railroad the PCs for maximum fuck-you from start to finish, and forces them into a theological deus ex machina at the end if they don't want Tzimisce to eat the entire world.

That is when the players have their PCs pull off their skin masks and reveal that they have been faithful slaves to Tzimisce all along and will do their part to make it's will be done.
 

Cerulean Lion

Social Justice Christian
Validated User
Re: Crucible of God and the "adventure" described by Raveled--so there are writers who actually think players will enjoy this?o_O
 

Arethusa

Sophipygian
RPGnet Member
Validated User
Re: Crucible of God and the "adventure" described by Raveled--so there are writers who actually think players will enjoy this?o_O
Maybe we’re thinking about this the wrong way.

Who buys modules? GMs. They are, when it comes down to it, the true point of sale customers for the product.

There are probably writers who think those who buy their modules will enjoy this.
 

Rupert

Active member
Validated User
Which always makes me wonder, "why do Rangers begin with TWO hit dice?!" Is that just to emulate Aragorn being tough or skilled or something? Even for the Ranger...it's weird.
It reflects their long experience in the wilderness, and stuff. It also gives them a hit point lead over fighters at low levels that is overtaken as the PCs level up and the fighter's greater ability at getting smacked in the face shines through.

I always found AD&D2's Rangers bland compared to AD&D1's.
 

Rupert

Active member
Validated User
Those are both seminal games, but they didn't really lean hard into genre-enforcement though rules. I remember the biggest complaint people had about Traveller is they wanted Star Wars, but got this gritty game where you played merchants; and Champions similarly was more about power building than really baking the 4 color genre into the rules. Games that went more in that direction include Marvel Super Heroes and Toon (both 1984).
If you wanted to play Star Wars or Lensmen-lite, you played Space Opera, not Traveller. Space Opera had it's flaws (many, many of them), but being low-powered and gritty as a default was not one of them (aside from the healing rules if you had no high-tech medical gear and drugs - unaided healing in Space Opera could be brutal).
 

Cerulean Lion

Social Justice Christian
Validated User
If this is the Space Opera I recall, the rules were so complicated as to be unplayable.

That is to say, unplayable by one Cerulean Lion. YMMV.
 

g026r

I'm a boat
Validated User
Speaking of undead, Crucible of God from the Gehenna book for VTM doesn't even try to be subtle about its denial of player agency.

The game tells the ST to railroad the PCs for maximum fuck-you from start to finish, and forces them into a theological deus ex machina at the end if they don't want Tzimisce to eat the entire world.
That was one of the "Saulot saves the world" scenarios, wasn't it? (I seem to recall there were two of them in there, neither of which was great for player agency as written, but it's been a while since I read that book.)
 

General Fishsticks

Tribune of the Plebs
Validated User
For me the one that stands out in my memory was Under a Blood Red Moon for Vampire/Werewolf. I remember my friend, as an experiment deciding that he would run it for us as a group of werewolves, but try to stick to the scenario as much as possible. We started with sensible, characterful werewolves, Bone Gnawers, with street skills... those died within the first scenario, butchered with uzi's filled with silver bullets (seriously it seemed every ghoul, mook and their dog was tooled up with most of the world's silver deposits. It was a fantastically badly railroaded situation 'but Mr Elder werewolf, we know the vampires are in this building can we not set the place on fire, and smoke them out of there?' 'No you must go into this well defended and prepared building as I want confirmed kills for these random NPC vampires' (I'm convinced the werewolf Elders worked for the insurance companies and didn't want to pay out for fire damage to the property).
I think we gave up after our third batch of characters, each dying in quick succession (I think the third iterations had become pure death machines lacking even the basic pretences of character.)
I always had a low opinion of Werewolf (weakest in concept of all the Storyteller games), a horrible hodge-podge of a game, with all the coherence of ideas and tackiness of a shelf in a new age shop; but this scenario just managed to drag it lower (and took vampire screaming down with it).
 

Ramidel

Registered User
Validated User
That was one of the "Saulot saves the world" scenarios, wasn't it? (I seem to recall there were two of them in there, neither of which was great for player agency as written, but it's been a while since I read that book.)
Yes.
 

DarkMoc

Registered User
Validated User
If this is the Space Opera I recall, the rules were so complicated as to be unplayable.

That is to say, unplayable by one Cerulean Lion. YMMV.
I'll agree with that. I have a copy of FGU Space Opera, and there's some great-looking stuff in it, but it's buried so deep in poorly organized cruft that it's barely salvageable as fluff for another system. I do like the first volume of Seldon's for small craft and merchant ships, but the core rules are migraine-inducing.
 
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